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Why does leg hair grow faster than thigh hair?

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An individual person’s hair can grow at different rates at various places on his/her head -- and body! It's all personal. AnswerParty!

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Leg hair is hair that grows on the legs of humans, generally appearing at the onset of adulthood. Male legs are most often hairier than female ones. The amount of hair on an individuals legs can depend on their ethnic background. People of Middle Eastern, South Asian, Eastern European, or general Mediterranean descent typically have more, however this may only appear to be true due to members of these ethnic groups having darker hair. People of East Asian, African and Northern European descent can have very little hair on their legs with some having virtually none.

For hygienic, aesthetics reasons and for some sports, women and men shave, wax, or use hair removal creams to remove the hair from their legs: see leg shaving.

Leg hair is hair that grows on the legs of humans, generally appearing at the onset of adulthood. Male legs are most often hairier than female ones. The amount of hair on an individuals legs can depend on their ethnic background. People of Middle Eastern, South Asian, Eastern European, or general Mediterranean descent typically have more, however this may only appear to be true due to members of these ethnic groups having darker hair. People of East Asian, African and Northern European descent can have very little hair on their legs with some having virtually none.

For hygienic, aesthetics reasons and for some sports, women and men shave, wax, or use hair removal creams to remove the hair from their legs: see leg shaving.

Leg shaving is the practice of removing leg hair by shaving the hair off using a razor or electric shaver. In addition, some people remove leg hair using waxing, sugaring, depilatories, depilation devices, or lasers, but shaving remains the least expensive method.

It is a very common practice among women in Western countries, and is also done by some men, especially bodybuilders, cyclists, swimmers and some runners.

Facial hair is a secondary sex characteristic of human males. Men typically start developing facial hair in the later years of puberty or adolescence, between seventeen and twenty years of age, and most do not finish developing a fully adult beard until their early twenties or later. This varies, as boys may first develop facial hair between fourteen and sixteen years of age, and boys as young as eleven have been known to develop facial hair. In addition, the patches of hair can vary between bushy and bristly. Women are also capable of developing facial hair, especially after menopause, though typically significantly less than men.

Male pogonotrophy (the growing of facial hair; i.e., beardedness) is often culturally associated with wisdom and virility. Men may style their facial hair into beards, moustaches, goatees or sideburns; others completely shave their facial hair. The term "whiskers," when used to refer to human facial hair, indicates the hair on the chin and cheeks.

Hair Shaving

Androgenic hair, colloquially body hair, is the terminal hair that develops on the human body during and after puberty. It is differentiated from the head hair and less visible vellus hair, which are much finer and lighter in color. The growth of androgenic hair is related to the level of androgens (male hormones) in the individual. Due to a normally higher level of androgen, men tend to have more androgenic hair than women.

From childhood onward, regardless of biological sex, vellus hair covers almost the entire area of the human body. Exceptions include the lips, the backs of the ears, the palms of hands, the soles of the feet, certain external genital areas, the navel and scar tissue. The density of hair – the number of hair follicles per area of skin – varies from person to person. In many cases, areas on the human body that contain vellus hair will begin to produce darker, thicker body hair. An example of this is the growth of an adolescent's beard on a once smooth chin.

The term scopa is used to refer to any of a number of different modifications on the body of a non-parasitic bee that form a pollen-carrying apparatus. In most bees, the scopa is simply a particularly dense mass of elongated, often branched, hairs (or setae) on the hind leg. When present on the hind legs, the modified hairs are, at a minimum, on the tibia, but some bees also have modified hairs on the femur and/or trochanter. A few bees have, in addition to the leg hairs, many modified hairs on the ventral surface of the abdomen which are also used in pollen transport; there is one family of bees, Megachilidae, in which the modified leg hairs are absent, and the scopa is limited to the abdominal hairs (see photo). In the familiar honey bees and bumblebees, the scopa is replaced by a structure known as the corbicula.

There are other various types of modified hairs on bees that are used to remove pollen, floral oils, or other chemicals from plants, and these can be on the face, mouthparts, or the front or middle legs, but these are not classified as a scopa; the term is explicitly restricted to hairs used to transport pollen. There are some bees which transport pollen internally in the crop, and these lack a scopa, as do cleptoparasitic bees, which do not gather their own pollen.

Hair removal, also known as epilation or depilation, is the removal of body hair, and describes the methods used to achieve that result.

Hair typically grows all over the human body. Hair can become more visible during and after puberty and men tend to have thicker, more visible body hair than women. Both men and women have visible hair on the head, eyebrows, eyelashes, armpits, pubic region, arms, and legs; and men also have thicker hair on their face, abdomen, back and chest. Hair does not generally grow on the underside of the hands, the lips, certain areas of the genital structure, or the underside of the feet.

Feathering (horse)

The universe of the anime and manga series Bobobo-bo Bo-bobo is a home to a wide array of fictional characters.

Voiced by: Takehito Koyasu (Japanese), Richard Epcar (English)

Anatomy

The human body is the entire structure of a human organism and comprises a head, neck, torso, two arms and two legs. By the time the human reaches adulthood, the body consists of close to 100 trillion cells, the basic unit of life. These cells are organised biologically to eventually form the whole body.

Fashion

Secondary sex characteristics are features that appear during puberty, especially those that distinguish the two sexes of a species, but that are not directly part of the reproductive system. They are believed to be the product of sexual selection for traits which give an individual an advantage over its rivals in courtship and aggressive interactions.]citation needed[ They are distinguished from the primary sex characteristics — the sex organs — which are directly necessary for reproduction to occur.

Well-known secondary sex characteristics include manes of male lions and long feathers of male peacocks. Other dramatic examples include the tusks of male narwhals, enlarged proboscises in male elephant seals and proboscis monkeys, the bright facial and rump coloration of male mandrills, and horns in many goats and antelopes. Male birds and fish of many species have brighter coloration or other external ornaments. Differences in size between sexes are also considered secondary sexual characteristics.

Long hair is a hairstyle where the hair is allowed to grow to considerable length. Exactly what constitutes long hair can change from culture to culture, or even within cultures. For example, a woman with chin-length hair in some cultures may be said to have short hair, while a man with the same length of hair in some of the same cultures would be said to have long hair.

Humans (and horses) are among the few species that may grow their head hair very long. Humans are believed to have lost their fur 2.5-3 million years ago when transiting from a forest habitat to the open savanna, as an effect of natural selection, since this development made it possible to run fast and hunt animals close to the equator without getting overheated. An exception was however head hair, which was kept to provide thermal insulation of the scalp from the sun, to protect against ultra-violet radiation exposure, and also to provide cooling (when sweat evaporates from soaked hair). The ability to grow long straight hair, has been observed among homo sapiens sub-groups in less sunny regions further away from the equator. Relative to curly Afro-textured hair, straight hair allows more UV light to pass to the scalp (which is essential for the production of vitamin D, that is important for bone development). Scientists also view the ability to grow very long hair as a result of sexual selection, since long and healthy hair is a sign of fertility and youth.]need quotation to verify[ Long lustrous female hair is rated attractive by both men and women across cultures. An evolutionary psychology explanation for this attraction is that hair length and quality can act as a cue to youth and health, signifying a woman's reproductive potential. As hair grows slowly, long hair may reveal 2–3 years of a person's health status, nutrition, age and reproductive fitness. Malnutrition and deficiencies in minerals and vitamins due to starvation causes loss of hair or changes in hair color (dark hair turns reddish). The prevalence of trichophilia (hair partialism or fetishism) is 7% in the population, and very long hair is a common subject of devotion in this group. Among the Masaai and other cultures, short or bald hair on women is considered attractive,]citation needed[ so the degree to which attraction to long hair in women is cultural remains to be studied.

Hair care is an overall term for parts of hygiene and cosmetology involving the hair on the human head. Hair care will differ according to one's hair type and according to various processes that can be applied to hair. All hair is not the same; indeed, hair is a manifestation of human diversity.

In this article, 'Hair care' is taken to mean care of hair on the human head, but mention should be made of process and services which impact hair on other parts of the body. This includes men‘s and women’s facial, pubic, and other body hair, which may be colored, trimmed, shaved, plucked, or otherwise removed with treatments such as waxing, sugaring, and threading. These services are offered in salons, barbershops, and day spas, and products are available commercially for home use. Laser hair removal and electrolysis are also available, though these are provided (in the US) by licensed professionals in medical offices or speciality spas.

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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