Question:

Why do mother birds reject their young?

Answer:

Birds don't abandon their young in response to human touch as we have always heard, but they will abandon [their offspring and their nest] in response to disturbance," explains biologist Thomas E. Martin. If a nest is disturbed they fear a predator.

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Thomas Ellsworth Martin (January 18, 1893 – June 27, 1971) was a United States Representative and Senator from Iowa. Martin, a Republican, served in Congress for 22 consecutive years, from January 1939 to January 1961.

Born in Melrose, Iowa, he attended the public schools and graduated from the State University of Iowa (in 1916) and from its College of Law (in 1927). He received his LL.M. from Columbia Law School in 1928 and was a sales analyst and accountant for a rubber company in Akron, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, in 1916 and 1917. During the First World War he served as a first lieutenant with the Thirty-fifth Infantry, United States Army, from 1917 to 1919. After the war, he continued work in the rubber industry, then became an assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Iowa from 1921 to 1923. He was admitted to the Iowa bar in 1927 and commenced practice in Iowa City, of which he served as city solicitor from 1933 to 1935 and mayor from 1935 to 1937.

Thomas Ellsworth Martin (January 18, 1893 – June 27, 1971) was a United States Representative and Senator from Iowa. Martin, a Republican, served in Congress for 22 consecutive years, from January 1939 to January 1961.

Born in Melrose, Iowa, he attended the public schools and graduated from the State University of Iowa (in 1916) and from its College of Law (in 1927). He received his LL.M. from Columbia Law School in 1928 and was a sales analyst and accountant for a rubber company in Akron, Ohio, and Dallas, Texas, in 1916 and 1917. During the First World War he served as a first lieutenant with the Thirty-fifth Infantry, United States Army, from 1917 to 1919. After the war, he continued work in the rubber industry, then became an assistant professor of military science and tactics at the University of Iowa from 1921 to 1923. He was admitted to the Iowa bar in 1927 and commenced practice in Iowa City, of which he served as city solicitor from 1933 to 1935 and mayor from 1935 to 1937.

Iowa's 1st congressional district is a congressional district in the U.S. state of Iowa that covers the northeastern part of the state. The district includes Dubuque, Cedar Rapids, and Waterloo.

The district is currently represented by Democrat Bruce Braley.

Jane H. Oberlin
Four grandchildren

University of Iowa College of Law

Jack Richard Miller (June 6, 1916 – August 29, 1994) was a Republican United States Senator from Iowa who served two terms from 1961 to 1973, and then a federal appellate judge.

Miller was born in Chicago, Illinois. He first moved to Sioux City, Iowa in 1932 as a teen. He attended The Oratory School in England, then received a bachelor's degree from Creighton University in Omaha in 1938 and a master's degree from the Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. in 1939.

Guy Mark Gillette (February 3, 1879 – March 3, 1973) was a Democratic U.S. Representative and Senator from Iowa. In the U.S. Senate, Gillette was elected, re-elected, defeated, elected again, and defeated again.

Born in Cherokee, Iowa, he attended public school and graduated from Drake University Law School in Des Moines in 1900. He was admitted to the bar in 1900 and commenced practice in Cherokee. During the Spanish-American War, he served as a sergeant in the Fifty-second Iowa Regiment in the United States Army, but never saw combat. He volunteered to fight against the British in Africa in the Boer War, but was turned down.

Frederick Delbert "Fred" Schwengel (May 28, 1906 – April 1, 1993) was a Republican U.S. Representative from southeastern Iowa.

Born on a farm near Sheffield, Iowa, Schwengel attended the rural schools in West Fork Township and high schools in Chapin and Sheffield. He graduated from Northeast Missouri Teachers College at Kirksville, Missouri in 1930, and attended graduate school at the University of Iowa in Iowa City from 1933 to 1935.

Edward C. Eicher (December 16, 1878 - November 29, 1944) was a three-term congressman, federal securities regulator, and U.S. District Court judge during the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt. He was considered a consummate New Deal liberal.

Eicher was born near the unincorporated town of Noble, Iowa in Washington County, Iowa. His father Benjamin Eicher was a Mennonite bishop. His older brother, H.M. Eicher, was an assistant district attorney during the administration of President Grover Cleveland.

Black and Gold

The University of Iowa College of Law is one of the eleven professional graduate schools at the University of Iowa, located in Iowa City, Iowa. Founded in 1865, it is the oldest law school in continuous operation west of the Mississippi River. The law school is currently ranked as the 26th best law school in the United States according to the U.S. News and World Report Best Law School rankings. It is the 8th best public law school in the country, and 3rd most affordable among the top 30.

Peter Edmund (Ed) Martin (born in 1882, in Wallaceburg, Ontario –died in 1944, in Detroit, Michigan) was a leading early production executive of the Ford Motor Company.

Ed Martin was hired by close Henry Ford associate C. Harold Wills on December 15, 1903, and at that time was the company's fifth employee.

Wendell Lewis Willkie (/ˈwɛndəl ˈlɨs ˈwɪlki/; February 18, 1892 – October 8, 1944) was a corporate lawyer in the United States and a dark horse who became the Republican Party nominee for president in 1940. A member of the liberal wing of the party, he crusaded against those domestic policies of the New Deal that he thought were inefficient and anti-business. Willkie, an internationalist, needed the votes of the large isolationist element, so he waffled on the bitterly debated issue of America's role in World War II, losing support from both sides. His opponent Franklin D. Roosevelt won the 1940 election with 55% of the popular vote and 85% of the electoral vote.

Afterward, Roosevelt found Willkie to be compatible politically with his plans and brought him aboard as an informal ambassador-at-large. Willkie criss-crossed the globe on the former army bomber The Gulliver, bringing home a vision of "One World" freed from imperialism and colonialism. Following his journeys, Willkie wrote One World; a bestselling account of his travels and meetings with the Allied heads of state, as well as ordinary citizens and soldiers in regions such as Russia and Iran. His liberalism lost him supporters in the GOP and he dropped out of the 1944 race, then several months later died of a heart attack. He never held political office.

Zoology Biology Ornithology

A bird nest is the spot in which a bird lays and incubates its eggs and raises its young. Although the term popularly refers to a specific structure made by the bird itself—such as the grassy cup nest of the American Robin or Eurasian Blackbird, or the elaborately woven hanging nest of the Montezuma Oropendola or the Village Weaver—that is too restrictive a definition. For some species, a nest is simply a shallow depression made in sand; for others, it is the knot-hole left by a broken branch, a burrow dug into the ground, a chamber drilled into a tree, an enormous rotting pile of vegetation and earth, a shelf made of dried saliva or a mud dome with an entrance tunnel. The smallest bird nests are those of some hummingbirds, tiny cups which can be a mere 2 cm (0.79 in) across and 2–3 cm (0.79–1.2 in) high. At the other extreme, some nest mounds built by the Dusky Scrubfowl measure more than 11 m (36 ft) in diameter and stand nearly 5 m (16 ft) tall.

Not all bird species build nests. Some species lay their eggs directly on the ground or rocky ledges, while brood parasites lay theirs in the nests of other birds, letting unwitting "foster parents" do all the work of rearing the young. Although nests are primarily used for breeding, they may also be reused in the non-breeding season for roosting and some species build special dormitory nests or roost nests (or winter-nest) that are used only for roosting. Most birds build a new nest each year, though some refurbish their old nests. The large eyries (or aeries) of some eagles are platform nests that have been used and refurbished for several years.

Predation Nest Environment biologist
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