Question:

Why did the Alpha Tau Omega Gamma Rho chapter get kicked off campus?

Answer:

Which campus were they kicked off of?

More Info:

Alpha Tau Omega (ΑΤΩ, its members colloquially known as ATO's, Taus, or Alpha Taus) is an American leadership and social fraternity founded at the Virginia Military Institute in 1865.

The Fraternity has more than 250 active and inactive chapters, more than 204,000 initiates, and over 7,000 active undergraduate members. The 200,000th member was initiated in early 2009. While the oldest active chapter is the Delta Chapter located at the University of Virginia, they temporarily lost their charter in 1984, making the Xi chapter at Duke University the oldest continuously operating chapter. Alpha Tau Omega is also one-third of the Lexington Triad, along with Kappa Alpha Order and Sigma Nu. The Fraternity does not have chapters or affiliated organizations in any other location outside of the United States.

Columbia /kəˈlʌmbiə/ is the fifth-largest city in Missouri, and the largest city in Mid-Missouri.</ref name="City and Town Totals: Vintage 2011"/> With a population of 113,225 as of the 2012 estimate according to the United States Census, it is the principal municipality of the Columbia Metropolitan Area, a region of 175,831 residents. The city serves as the county seat of Boone County and as the location of the University of Missouri. The college town has a reputation as politically liberal and is known by the nicknames "The Athens of Missouri," and "CoMO." Over half of Columbians possess a bachelor's degree and over a quarter hold graduate degrees, making it the thirteenth most highly educated municipality in the United States. The city is currently in the midst of a construction boom, with numerous high-rise apartments, hotels, and condos going up downtown. As downtown grows upward, the city continues to expand outward, with new subdivision construction in the north, south and west sides of town.

The area that became Columbia was once inhabited by successive mound-building cultures of Native Americans. In 1818, a group of settlers incorporated under the Smithton Land Company purchased over 2,000 acres (8.1 km2) and established the village of Smithton near present-day downtown Columbia. In 1821, the settlers moved and renamed the settlement Columbia—a poetic name for the United States. The founding of the University of Missouri in 1839 established the city as a center of education and research. Two other institutions of higher education, Stephens College in 1833 and Columbia College in 1851, were also established within the city.

Greek Life at the University of Missouri

The University of Missouri (Mizzou, MU, University of Missouri–Columbia or simply Missouri) is a public research university located in the state of Missouri. In 1839 the university was founded in Columbia, Missouri, as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. The largest university in Missouri, MU enrolls 34,616 students in 20 academic colleges in the 2013–14 year. The university is the flagship of the University of Missouri System which maintains campuses in Rolla, Kansas City and St. Louis. MU is one of the nation's top-tier R1 institutions, and one of 34 public universities to be members of the Association of American Universities and the only one in Missouri. There are more than 270,000 MU alumni living worldwide, with almost one half continuing to reside in Missouri. The University of Missouri was ranked 97th in the 2014 U.S. News & World Report among the national universities, steady from the previous year.

The campus of the University of Missouri is 1,262 acres (511 ha) just south of Downtown Columbia and is maintained as a botanical garden. The historical campus is centered on Francis Quadrangle, a historic district that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and a number of buildings on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1908, the world's first school of journalism was founded by Walter Williams as the Missouri School of Journalism.

Rutgers University is home to chapters of many Greek organizations, however, only a small percentage of the undergraduate student body is active in Greek life. Several fraternities and sororities maintain houses for their chapters in the area of Union Street (known as "Frat Row") in New Brunswick within blocks of Rutgers' College Avenue Campus.

In 1845, Delta Phi became the first fraternity to organize on the campus. Zeta Psi was the second fraternity and was organized in 1845 as well. Delta Upsilon was the third fraternity to establish itself on the campus in 1858; the first non-secret fraternity in New Brunswick. The Alpha Rho chapter of Chi Psi Fraternity, founded at Rutgers College in 1879, was the first fraternity at Rutgers to own a fraternity house, or "Lodge", purchased in 1887. The fraternity today still owns and occupies the same property at 114 College Avenue. Presently, there are over fifty fraternities and sororities on the New Brunswick-Piscataway campus, ranging from traditional to historically African-American, Hispanic, Multicultural and Asian-interest organizations. Greek organizations are governed by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs. Twelve organizations currently maintain chapters in New Brunswick without sanction by the University's administration.

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