Question:

Why did Grissom leave the show CSI: Las Vegas?

Answer:

William Petersen left CSI to go back into theater, and to flex his artistic muscle. He was becoming too comfortable in the role.

More Info:

CSI Television Series

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (referred to as CSI, also known as CSI: Las Vegas) is an American crime drama television series, that premiered on CBS on October 6, 2000. The show was created by Anthony E. Zuiker and produced by Jerry Bruckheimer. It is filmed primarily at Universal Studios in Universal City, California.

The series follows Las Vegas criminalists (identified as "Crime Scene Investigators") working for the Las Vegas Police Department (LVPD) (instead of the actual title of "Crime Scene Analysts" and " Police DepartmentMetropolitanLas Vegas " (LVMPD)) as they use physical evidence to solve grisly murders in this unusually graphic drama, which has inspired a host of other cop-show "procedurals". The series mixes deduction, gritty subject matter and character-driven drama. The network later added spin-offs CSI: Miami and CSI: NY, which have both been cancelled after ten and nine seasons respectively.

William Louis Petersen (born February 21, 1953) is an American actor and producer, best known for playing Dr. Gilbert "Gil" Grissom on the hit CBS series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, Richard Chance in the film To Live and Die in L.A., and Will Graham in the film Manhunter.

Dr. Gilbert Arthur "Gil" Grissom, Ph.D., is a fictional character on the CBS crime drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, portrayed by William Petersen. Grissom was a forensic entomologist and the night shift supervisor of the Clark County, Nevada CSI (forensics) team, investigating crimes in and around the city of Las Vegas. He was the show's protagonist from seasons one to nine, when Petersen left the show as a regular, and was replaced by Laurence Fishburne as Dr. Raymond Langston, M.D. He appeared in 190 episodes.

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation producer and writer Carol Mendelsohn considers Grissom the center of the show, and in the first seven years of the show he appeared in every episode, with the exception of "Hollywood Brass", from season five, "Gum Drops" and "The Unusual Suspect" from season six, and "Sweet Jane" and "Redrum" from season seven. In late season six, it is revealed that he has become romantically involved with subordinate CSI Sara Sidle.

Sara Sidle is a fictional character on the CBS crime drama CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, portrayed by actress Jorja Fox. Sidle is a forensic scientist and one of the core characters of the show, which revolves around a crime scene investigation team from Clark County, Nevada that investigates cases in and around the city of Las Vegas. In the first seven years of the show, Sidle appears in every episode except in the pilot, "Random Acts of Violence" from season three, "Jackpot" from season four, "Formalities", "Hollywood Brass" from season five and "Spellbound" from season six.

Sidle then recurred during seasons 9 and 10, returning to the main cast in Season 11. Following her return she has been absent from: "Sqweegel", "Cold Blooded", "Fracked", "Man Up", "A Kiss Before Frying", "The List", and "Father of the Bride" from season eleven, "Maid Man", "Genetic Disorder", "Trends with Benefits" and "Altered Stakes" from season twelve, "Play Dead", "CSI on Fire", "Dead of the Class", and "Skin in the Game" from season thirteen, "Torch Song" from season fourteen.

Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention. Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens. The process has been accelerated in modern times by an entertainment industry which records and sells entertainment products. Entertainment evolves and can be adapted to suit any scale, ranging from an individual who chooses a private entertainment from a now enormous array of pre-recorded products; to a banquet adapted for two; to any size or type of party, with appropriate music and dance; to performances intended for thousands; and even for a global audience.

The experience of being entertained has come to be strongly associated with amusement, so that one common understanding of the idea is fun and laughter, although many entertainments have a serious purpose. This may be the case in the various forms of ceremony, celebration, religious festival, or satire for example. Hence, there is the possibility that what appears as entertainment may also be a means of achieving insight or intellectual growth.

Las Vegas /lɑːs ˈvɡəs/ is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Nevada and the county seat of Clark County. Las Vegas is an internationally renowned major resort city known primarily for gambling, shopping, fine dining, and nightlife and is the leading financial and cultural center for Southern Nevada. The city bills itself as The Entertainment Capital of the World, and is famous for its consolidated casino–hotels and associated entertainment. A growing retirement and family city, Las Vegas is the 31st-most populous city in the United States, with a population at the 2010 census of 583,756. The 2010 population of the Las Vegas metropolitan area was 1,951,269. The city is one of the top three leading destinations in the United States for conventions, business, and meetings. Today, Las Vegas is one of the top tourist destinations in the world.

Established in 1905, Las Vegas was incorporated as a city in 1911. At the close of the 20th century, Las Vegas was the most populous American city founded in that century (a distinction held by Chicago in the 19th century). The city's tolerance for various forms of adult entertainment earned it the title of Sin City, and this image has made Las Vegas a popular setting for films and television programs. There are numerous outdoor lighting displays on Fremont Street, as well as elsewhere in the city.

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