Question:

Who won the Nascar race at Darlington tonight?

Answer:

Mark Martin laid low until it was time to go, winning for the second time there and for the second time in the past four races.

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Nascar

Auto racing (also known as car racing, motor racing or automobile racing) is a sport involving the racing of automobiles for competition. There are numerous different categories of auto racing.

Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Great Britain, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately 0.25 to 2.66 miles (0.4 to 4.3 kilometers). NASCAR is the world's largest governing body for stock car racing, and its Sprint Cup Series is the de facto premier series of stock car racing. Top level races are 200 to 600 miles (322 to 966 km) in length.

Average speeds in the top classes are usually 70–80% of comparable levels of open wheel racing at the same tracks. Some stock cars may reach speeds in excess of 200 mph (322 km/h) at tracks such as Daytona International Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway. These tracks have come to be known as "restrictor plate tracks", a name that is derived from the "restrictor plate" device that was designed to limit top speeds to approximately 192 mph (309 km/h) on such tracks.

Mark Anthony Martin (born January 9, 1959) is an American stock car racing driver. He currently drives the No. 14 Chevrolet SS in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series, acting as a substitute driver for the injured Tony Stewart. He has the second most wins in the Nationwide Series with 49. He has finished second in the Sprint Cup Series standings five times and has been described by ESPN as "The best driver to never win a championship."

Mountain Dew (stylized as Mtn Dew in the United States) is a carbonated soft drink brand produced and owned by PepsiCo. The original formula was invented in 1940 by Tennessee beverage bottlers Barney and Ally Hartman and was first marketed in Marion, Virginia; Knoxville, Tennessee and Johnson City, Tennessee with the slogan "Ya-Hoo! Mountain Dew. It'll tickle yore innards." A revised formula was created by Bill Bridgforth in 1958. The Mountain Dew brand and production rights were acquired by the Pepsi-Cola company in 1964, at which point distribution expanded more widely across the United States and Canada.

Between the 1940s and 1980s, there was just one variety of Mountain Dew, which was citrus-flavored and caffeinated. Diet Mountain Dew was introduced in 1988, followed by Mountain Dew Red, which was introduced and subsequently discontinued in 1988. While Mountain Dew Red was short-lived, it represented the beginning of a long-term trend of Mountain Dew being produced in different flavor variations. In 2001, a cherry flavor called Code Red debuted. This product line extension trend has continued, with expansion into specialty, limited time production, region-specific, and retailer-specific (Taco Bell, 7-Eleven) variations of Mountain Dew.

Darrell Lee Waltrip, (born February 5, 1947), is an American motorsports analyst, author, national television broadcaster, former racing car driver, a 3-time NASCAR Cup Series champion, (1981, 1982, 1985), a 3-time NASCAR Cup Series runner-up, (1979, 1983, 1986), winner of the 1989 Daytona 500, and the first 5-time winner of the Coca-Cola 600 (formerly the World 600), the Series' longest race (1978, 1979, 1985, 1988, 1989), (a first for any driver, all time). Posting a modern NASCAR series record of 22 top five finishes in 1983, 21 top five finishes, (both in 1981, and 1986), Waltrip is the winner of 84 NASCAR Cup Series races, including 12 wins at Bristol Motor Speedway, seven of which were consecutive wins beginning in 1981, and ending April 1, 1984, (a track and Series' record for any driver, all time). Waltrip's 84 wins places him second only to Jeff Gordon, for the most wins in the modern era of NASCAR, tying him with driver Bobby Allison, for fourth on the all-time list of NASCAR Cup series winners. Waltrip won 59 NASCAR Cup Series pole positions, (second all-time), including 35 on short tracks, and 8 on road courses, (both all-time highs for any driver, all time). He has 271 top-five finishes, (33% of all NASCAR Cup series races started), and 390 top-ten finishes, (48% of all NASCAR Cup series races started), ran 237,773 laps, 280,788 miles, led 23,134 laps, (10% of all laps raced), won $19,886,666.00, in posted earnings, competing in 809 NASCAR Cup series races, spanning 29 years, and four different decades, (1972–2000), and still holds many NASCAR records, more than a decade after his retirement as an active driver.

In addition to NASCAR's premier racing series, Waltrip won 13 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series races, 7 American Speed Association (ASA) races, 3 IROC races, 2 Automobile Racing Club of America (ARCA) races, 2 NASCAR All-American Challenge Series events, 2 All Pro Racing Association races, a USAC race, and competed in the 24 Hours of Daytona, a 24-hour sports car endurance race. Waltrip also holds the all-time track record with 67 wins at the Music City Motorplex, formerly Fairgrounds Speedway, in Nashville, Tennessee, including NASCAR, USAC, ASA, and local Late Model Sportsman NASCAR sanctioned series races.

The NASCAR Sprint Cup Series (often shortened to Sprint Cup or the Cup Series) is the top racing series of the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR). The series is named for its current sponsor, the Sprint Corporation, and has been known by other names in the past. It was originally known as the Strictly Stock Series (1949) and shortly became the Grand National Series (1950–1970). While leasing its naming rights to R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, it was known as the Winston Cup Series (1971–2003). A similar deal was made with NEXTEL in 2003, becoming the NEXTEL Cup Series (2004–2007) and it became the Sprint Cup after Sprint acquired NEXTEL in 2005. The name "Sprint" refers specifically to the subsidiary of Japanese telecommunications company SoftBank which is the entitlement sponsor; sprint car racing is a separate racing discipline.

The drivers' champion is determined by a point system where points are given according to finishing placement and laps led. The season is divided into two segments. After the first 26 races, the 10 highest ranked drivers, plus the two drivers with the most race wins of those ranked from 11th through 20th in points, are seeded based on their total number of wins and compete in the last 10 races with the difference in points greatly minimized. This is called the Chase for the Championship.

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