Question:

Who will win the Notre dame vs Purdue football game today?

Answer:

Talent wise, Purdue is the better football team. I think coaching wise the Notre Dame is the better team. The biggest key is that Notre Dame is at home... I'm going to go with ND with the slight upset.

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Shillelagh Trophy
Shillelagh Trophy can refer to:

Megaphone Trophy
The Michigan State–Notre Dame football rivalry is an American college football rivalry between the Michigan State Spartans football team of Michigan State University and Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame. The Megaphone Trophy is awarded to the winner of the game. Michigan State and Notre Dame started competing against each other in football in 1897. The overall win-loss record between the two teams is 46–28–1, while the Megaphone Trophy series record is 32–26–1, both favoring the Fighting Irish. The Notre Dame side of the trophy is blue, while the Michigan State side is green. The rivalry includes several notable games, such as the 1966 game, arguably one of the greatest college football games ever played. Notre Dame currently leads the series. Games played prior to 1949 also appear on the trophy to commemorate the entire series. Notre Dame is the current holder of the trophy, with a 20–3 victory on September 14, 2012. After an 8–0 series run by Notre Dame from 1987 to 1994, tying the series win streak set by Michigan State from 1955 to 1963 (they didn't meet in 1958), Michigan State won five games in a row. Michigan State won 44–41 in double overtime at Notre Dame in 2005. Notre Dame pulled out a thrilling come from behind 40–37 victory in East Lansing in 2006. The trend continued in 2007 for Michigan State under new head coach Mark Dantonio who defeated the Fighting Irish 31–14, recording MSU's sixth straight victory at Notre Dame. On September 20, 2008, MSU defeated Notre Dame 23–7 in East Lansing, ending the series "jinx" of home teams always losing since 2001. Notre Dame returned the favor the following year by defeating MSU at Notre Dame. The 2010 meeting had one of the most exciting finishes to the start of the college football season. A back and forth battle the entire game, Notre Dame took the lead in overtime off of a field goal. After Spartans quarterback Kirk Cousins was sacked on third down, Michigan State lined up for a field goal to tie the game at 31. They faked it, and Aaron Bates, the holder, tossed a game-winning touchdown pass to Charlie Gantt to win it 34–31 for the Spartans. In 2011, the Irish reclaimed the trophy with a 31–13 victory in which they led all the way.

Holy War (Boston College vs. Notre Dame)
The Holy War is an American college football rivalry between the Boston College Eagles football team of Boston College and Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame. The series derives its name from the fact that the Eagles and the Fighting Irish represent the only two Catholic universities in the United States which still compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the highest level of competition in American college football. Although football at both universities dates to the 19th century, the series itself is relatively young. Boston College and Notre Dame first met on the gridiron on September 15, 1975, in a game held at Foxboro Stadium in Massachusetts. Since then, the two schools have met a total of 20 times, including a match-up in the 1983 Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tennessee. An annual series was held from 1992–2004 and after a two-season hiatus the rivalry has resumed for the 2007–12 seasons and it will continue for the 2015–16 and 2018–19 seasons. Notre Dame leads the overall series 13-9. The future of the series had been in question for several years after Boston College left the Big East for the ACC and the Big East asked Notre Dame to add at least three Big East schools each year to its football schedule, but on June, 8, 2010, it was announced that the series would continue. While the "Holy War" moniker dates to the first contest between the two schools in 1975 and has become popularized in the sports media, the rivalry has also acquired a number of other nicknames over the years. These include the "Vatican Bowl", the "Frank Leahy Memorial Bowl", and the "Jesuit Invitational". Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, a Notre Dame alumna, referenced the rivalry using the "Holy War" moniker during a 2006 commencement address at BC's Alumni Stadium. BC goes 2-0 against top 5 ranked Irish teams Since their first meeting in 1975, the Fighting Irish and the Eagles have generated some memorable moments in only 32 years. The teams played each season from 1992 until 2004. Over the course of 18 games, here are some of the more memorable ones: The Frank Leahy Memorial Bowl is a trophy, in the form of a large cut-crystal bowl, given to the winner of the Boston College-Notre Dame football game. It is named after the legendary Frank Leahy, who was the head coach at both schools. The award is presented to the winning team at the conclusion of the game by members of the Notre Dame Club of Boston. The Ireland Trophy, created by the Notre Dame student government in 1994, is presented annually "as a token of goodwill, camaraderie and friendly rivalry" to the winner of the game. On November 2, 2005, Notre Dame announced that because it had agreed to a request from the Big East to play teams from that conference each season, it would suspend the Boston College series following the 2010 season. Big East Commissioner Mike Tranghese said the conference made the request after Boston College, Miami, and Virginia Tech withdrew from the Big East to join the Atlantic Coast Conference. However, on February 6, 2007, BC Director of Athletics Gene DeFilippo stated “The Notre Dame contract calls for two games at Notre Dame, in 2007 and 2009, and two games in Boston, in 2008 and 2010. We have been in discussions with Notre Dame concerning additional games and I am very hopeful that we will be able to announce something in the near future.” ESPN commentators during the 2008 game suggested that the two universities were trying to find a way to renew the rivalry after 2010. On June 8, 2010, the Boston Herald quoted Boston College Athletic Director Gene DeFilippo stating "“Jack Swarbrick and I agreed that since Boston College and Notre Dame are the only Catholic institutions that play Division 1-A football, we should continue to play each other over a period of years." Boston College is scheduled to host the Fighting Irish at Alumni Stadium in 2012, 2015 and 2019. The Eagles will travel to South Bend, Indiana, to play Notre Dame in 2016 and 2018.

1971 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team
The 1971 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1971 college football season.


Frank Leahy Memorial Bowl
The Holy War is an American college football rivalry between the Boston College Eagles football team of Boston College and Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team of the University of Notre Dame. The series derives its name from the fact that the Eagles and the Fighting Irish represent the only two Catholic universities in the United States which still compete in the Football Bowl Subdivision of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, the highest level of competition in American college football. Although football at both universities dates to the 19th century, the series itself is relatively young. Boston College and Notre Dame first met on the gridiron on September 15, 1975, in a game held at Foxboro Stadium in Massachusetts. Since then, the two schools have met a total of 20 times, including a match-up in the 1983 Liberty Bowl in Memphis, Tennessee. An annual series was held from 1992–2004 and after a two-season hiatus the rivalry has resumed for the 2007–12 seasons and it will continue for the 2015–16 and 2018–19 seasons. Notre Dame leads the overall series 13-9. The future of the series had been in question for several years after Boston College left the Big East for the ACC and the Big East asked Notre Dame to add at least three Big East schools each year to its football schedule, but on June, 8, 2010, it was announced that the series would continue. While the "Holy War" moniker dates to the first contest between the two schools in 1975 and has become popularized in the sports media, the rivalry has also acquired a number of other nicknames over the years. These include the "Vatican Bowl", the "Frank Leahy Memorial Bowl", and the "Jesuit Invitational". Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, a Notre Dame alumna, referenced the rivalry using the "Holy War" moniker during a 2006 commencement address at BC's Alumni Stadium. BC goes 2-0 against top 5 ranked Irish teams Since their first meeting in 1975, the Fighting Irish and the Eagles have generated some memorable moments in only 32 years. The teams played each season from 1992 until 2004. Over the course of 18 games, here are some of the more memorable ones: The Frank Leahy Memorial Bowl is a trophy, in the form of a large cut-crystal bowl, given to the winner of the Boston College-Notre Dame football game. It is named after the legendary Frank Leahy, who was the head coach at both schools. The award is presented to the winning team at the conclusion of the game by members of the Notre Dame Club of Boston. The Ireland Trophy, created by the Notre Dame student government in 1994, is presented annually "as a token of goodwill, camaraderie and friendly rivalry" to the winner of the game. On November 2, 2005, Notre Dame announced that because it had agreed to a request from the Big East to play teams from that conference each season, it would suspend the Boston College series following the 2010 season. Big East Commissioner Mike Tranghese said the conference made the request after Boston College, Miami, and Virginia Tech withdrew from the Big East to join the Atlantic Coast Conference. However, on February 6, 2007, BC Director of Athletics Gene DeFilippo stated “The Notre Dame contract calls for two games at Notre Dame, in 2007 and 2009, and two games in Boston, in 2008 and 2010. We have been in discussions with Notre Dame concerning additional games and I am very hopeful that we will be able to announce something in the near future.” ESPN commentators during the 2008 game suggested that the two universities were trying to find a way to renew the rivalry after 2010. On June 8, 2010, the Boston Herald quoted Boston College Athletic Director Gene DeFilippo stating "“Jack Swarbrick and I agreed that since Boston College and Notre Dame are the only Catholic institutions that play Division 1-A football, we should continue to play each other over a period of years." Boston College is scheduled to host the Fighting Irish at Alumni Stadium in 2012, 2015 and 2019. The Eagles will travel to South Bend, Indiana, to play Notre Dame in 2016 and 2018.

Notre Dame, Our Mother
"Notre Dame, Our Mother" is the alma mater (official song of devotion) of the University of Notre Dame, a private, Catholic research university in northern Indiana. The song is addressed to 'Notre Dame', a reference to both the university and its patroness and namesake, the Blessed Virgin Mary. Joseph Casasanta, a 1923 Notre Dame graduate, composed the song for the Oct. 11, 1930, dedication of Notre Dame Stadium. Rev. Charles O'Donnell, C.S.C., president of the university at the time of composition, wrote the song's lyrics in honor of the university's patroness, Mary, the Mother of Jesus. Besides the usual role an alma mater plays for the school, it is part of the postgame show of the Band of the Fighting Irish and is the traditional conclusion to Notre Dame pep rallies, football games, other sporting events, and major religious services, often sung before the last hymn at Mass. When singing the alma mater, students often put their arms over each other's shoulders and sway as they sing. This is especially common at the end of home football games. Video Reference from University of Notre Dame website. Notre Dame, our Mother
Tender, strong and true
Proudly in the heavens
Gleams thy gold and blue
Glory’s mantle cloaks thee
Golden is thy fame
And our hearts forever
Praise thee Notre Dame
And our hearts forever
Love thee Notre Dame!

1972 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team
The 1972 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team represented the University of Notre Dame during the 1972 college football season.


North Dakota

North Dakota Listeni/ˌnɔrθ dəˈktə/ is the 39th state of the United States, having been admitted thereto on November 2, 1889. It is located in the Upper Midwestern region of the United States, with its northern border running along the borders with the provinces of Saskatchewan and Manitoba of Canada, and with the states of Minnesota to the east, South Dakota to the south and Montana to the west. The state capitol is located in Bismarck and the largest city is Fargo. Currently, North Dakota is the 19th most extensive but the 3rd least populous and the 4th least densely populated of the 50 United States.

The primary public universities are located in Grand Forks and Fargo. The U.S. Air Force operates air bases near Minot and Grand Forks.

Notre Dame Fighting Irish football rivalries refers to rivalries of the University of Notre Dame in the sport of college football. Notre Dame has rivalries with several universities. Because the Fighting Irish are independent of a football conference, they play a more national schedule, and have thus developed both intense rivalries as well as frequently scheduled series with many schools. Because of Notre Dame's independent scheduling, often times fan bases of Notre Dame's opponents as well as national media confuse the term rival with that of a frequently scheduled team.

Notre Dame has long running historic rivalries with University of Southern California, Navy, Purdue, and Michigan State University and an intermittent historic rivalry with the University of Michigan. With the recent commitment by Notre Dame to join the ACC full time in all sports except football and play a minimum of five games per year in football, the future of many of these rivalries are uncertain. Notre Dame's stated scheduling priorities are USC, Stanford, Navy and the five game alliance with the ACC.

Shillelagh Trophy
College football

College football is American football played by teams of student athletes fielded by American universities, colleges, and military academies, or Canadian football played by teams of student athletes fielded by Canadian universities. It was through college football play that American football rules first gained popularity in the United States.


Notre Dame Fighting Irish football

Gold and Navy Blue

The Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the intercollegiate football team of the University of Notre Dame. The team is currently coached by Brian Kelly and play home games at the campus' Notre Dame Stadium, with a capacity of 80,795. Notre Dame competes as an Independent at the NCAA Football Bowl Subdivision level, and is a founding member of the Bowl Championship Series coalition (BCS). The Fighting Irish have 13 national championships recognized by the NCAA, tied for first out of all FBS schools in the post-1900 era. A record seven Notre Dame players have won the Heisman trophy and the program has produced an NCAA record 96 consensus All-Americans and 32 unanimous All-Americans, more than any other university. As of the 2013 NFL Draft, Notre Dame has produced and have had drafted the most NFL players of all-time.


National Collegiate Athletic Association

The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (pronounced "N-C-Double-A") is a nonprofit association of 1,281 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States and Canada. It is headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana.

In August 1973, the current three-division setup of Division I, Division II, and Division III was adopted by the NCAA membership in a special convention. Under NCAA rules, Division I and Division II schools can offer scholarships to athletes for playing a sport. Division III schools may not offer any athletic scholarships. Generally, larger schools compete in Division I and smaller schools in II and III. Division I football was further divided into I-A and I-AA in 1978. Subsequently the term "Division I-AAA" was briefly added to delineate Division I schools which do not field a football program at all, but that term is no longer officially used by the NCAA. In 2006, Divisions I-A and I-AA were respectively renamed the Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS) and Football Championship Subdivision (FCS).

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