Question:

Who was credited with the first periodic table?

Answer:

Around 1870, Russian chemist Dmitry Mendeleyev constructed the original periodic table.

More Info:

The periodic table is a tabular arrangement of the chemical elements, organized on the basis of their atomic numbers, electron configurations, and recurring chemical properties. Elements are presented in order of increasing atomic number (the number of protons in the nucleus). The standard form of the table consists of a grid of elements laid out in 18 columns and 7 rows, with a double row of elements below that. The table can also be deconstructed into four rectangular blocks: the s-block to the left, the p-block to the right, the d-block in the middle, and the f-block below that.

The rows of the table are called periods; the columns are called groups, with some of these having names such as halogens or noble gases. Since, by definition, a periodic table incorporates recurring trends, any such table can be used to derive relationships between the properties of the elements and predict the properties of new, yet to be discovered or synthesized, elements. As a result, a periodic table—whether in the standard form or some other variant—provides a useful framework for analyzing chemical behavior, and such tables are widely used in chemistry and other sciences.

Science and technology in Russia developed rapidly since the Age of Enlightenment, when Peter the Great founded the Russian Academy of Sciences and Saint Petersburg State University and polymath Mikhail Lomonosov founded the Moscow State University, establishing a strong native tradition in learning and innovation.

In the 19th and 20th centuries the country produced a large number of notable scientists, making important contributions into physics, astronomy, mathematics, computing, chemistry, biology, geology and geography. Russian inventors and engineers excelled in such areas as electrical engineering, shipbuilding, aerospace, weaponry, communications, IT, nuclear technology and space technology.

Science Chemistry

Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev (Russian: Дми́трий Ива́нович Менделе́ев, IPA: [ˈdmʲitrʲɪj ɪˈvanəvʲɪt͡ɕ mʲɪndʲɪˈlʲejɪf] ( listen); 8 February 1834 – 2 February 1907 O.S. 27 January 1834 – 20 January 1907) was a Russian chemist and inventor. He formulated the Periodic Law, created his own version of the periodic table of elements, and used it to correct the properties of some already discovered elements and also to predict the properties of elements yet to be discovered.

Mendeleyev Dmitry

Mendeleyev Glacier (71.917°S 14.550°E / -71.917; 14.550 / 71°55′S 14°33′ECoordinates: 71.917°S 14.550°E / -71.917; 14.550 / 71°55′S 14°33′E) is a glacier, 10 nautical miles (19 km) long, draining northeast through the northern outcrops of the Payer Mountains, in Queen Maud Land, Antarctica. It was mapped from air photos and surveys by the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, 1960–61, and named after Russian chemist Dmitri Mendeleev, whose surname may also be transliterated as "Mendeleyev".

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document "Mendeleyev Glacier" (content from the Geographic Names Information System).

John Alexander Reina Newlands (26 November 1837 – 29 July 1898) was an English chemist who worked on the development of the periodic table.

Newlands was born in London and was the son of a Scottish Presbyterian minister and his Italian wife. He was homeschooled by his father and went on to study at the Royal College of Chemistry. He was interested in social reform and in 1860 served as a volunteer with Giuseppe Garibaldi in his campaign to unify Italy. Returning to London, Newlands set up in practice as an analytical chemist in 1864, and in 1868 he became chief chemist in James Duncan's London sugar refinery, where he introduced a number of improvements in processing. Later he left the refinery and again set up as an analyst with his brother, Benjamin.

Dmitri Ivanovich Mendeleev (Russian: Дми́трий Ива́нович Менделе́ев, IPA: [ˈdmʲitrʲɪj ɪˈvanəvʲɪt͡ɕ mʲɪndʲɪˈlʲejɪf] ( listen); 8 February 1834 – 2 February 1907 O.S. 27 January 1834 – 20 January 1907) was a Russian chemist and inventor. He formulated the Periodic Law, created his own version of the periodic table of elements, and used it to correct the properties of some already discovered elements and also to predict the properties of elements yet to be discovered.

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