Question:

Who sings that country song called Cinderella?

Answer:

The song you are thinking of is "Stealing Cinderella" by Chuck Wicks. The lyrics are: "I came to see her daddy for sit down man to man It wasn't any secret i'd be asking for her hand I guess that's why he left me waiting in the living room by myself with at least a dozen pictures of her sitting on a shelf - Chorus - She was playing Cinderella She was riding her first bike Bouncing on the bed and looking for a pillow fight Running through the sprinkler with a big popsicle grin Dancing with her dad, looking up at him In her eyes i'm Prince Charming But to him i'm just some fella riding in and stealing Cinderella I leaned in towards those pictures to get a better look at one When I heard a voice behind me say "Now, ain't she something, son?" I said "Yes, she quite a woman" and he just stared at me Then I realized that in his eyes she would always be - Chorus - Playing Cinderella Riding her first bike Bouncing on the bed and looking for a pillow fight Running." MORE

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Cinderella Cinderella

Cinderella is a 1950 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by RKO Radio Pictures. Based on the fairy tale "Cendrillon" by Charles Perrault. Twelfth in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film released on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. Directing credits go to Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske and Wilfred Jackson. Songs were written by Mack David, Jerry Livingston, and Al Hoffman. Songs in the film include "A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes", "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo", "So This Is Love", "Sing Sweet Nightingale", "The Work Song", and "Cinderella".

Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical written for television, with music by Richard Rodgers and a book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Vair, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother and self-centered stepsisters, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into a Princess and finds her Prince.

Cinderella is the only Rodgers and Hammerstein musical written for television. It was originally broadcast live on CBS on March 31, 1957 as a vehicle for Julie Andrews, who played the title role. The broadcast was viewed by more than 100 million people. It was subsequently remade for television twice, in 1965 and 1997. The 1965 version starred Lesley Ann Warren, and the 1997 one starred Brandy Norwood in the title role. Both remakes add songs from other Richard Rodgers musicals.

In American and Canadian sports, a Cinderella or "Cinderella Story" refers to a team or player who advances much further in a tournament or career than originally anticipated.]citation needed[ Cinderellas tend to gain much media and fan attention as they move closer to the championship game at the end of the tournament.]citation needed[ The term comes from the fairy tale Cinderella, in which the protagonist is the honored guest at a party to the surprise of everyone. The term has been used at least since 1939, but came into widespread usage in 1950, in reference to City College of New York, the unexpected winners of the NCAA Men's Basketball championship that year. The term was used by Bill Murray in the 1980 hit movie Caddyshack where he pretends as the announcer to his own golf fantasy: "Cinderella story. Outta nowhere. A former greenskeeper, now, about to become the Masters champion."

Referring somewhat inaccurately to the plot details of the classic Cinderella story, the media will debate whether the given "Cinderella" team or player will "turn into a pumpkin," i.e. fail to win the prize and then return to its former obscurity. In the fairy tale, it was the carriage that turned into a pumpkin at midnight, not Cinderella herself. Another popular term is "strike midnight," when a Cinderella team does finally get beaten.

Cinderella is an American glam metal band from Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania. They emerged in the mid-1980s with a series of multi-platinum albums and hit singles whose music videos received heavy MTV rotation. They were famous for being a glam metal band, but then shifted over towards a more hard rock/blues-rock sound. By the mid-1990s, the band's popularity declined severely due to personal setbacks, break-ups, and changes in the music industry. Nonetheless, after a hiatus the band reunited and is still active at present. The band has sold 15 million albums worldwide, according to Tom Keifer's official website.

Cinderella was formed in Clifton Heights in 1983 by singer-songwriter, keyboardist, and guitarist Tom Keifer and bassist Eric Brittingham. The initial lineup also included guitarist Michael Smerick and drummer Tony Destra. In 1985, Smerick and Destra left to form Britny Fox, another Philadelphia-based glam metal band that later relocated to Los Angeles. Cinderella got their big break when Jon Bon Jovi saw them perform at the Empire Rock Club in Philadelphia and recommended that his A&R rep Derek Shulman who knew of the band, see them as well. In 1985, with a recording contract with Mercury/Polygram Records in the works, guitarist Jeff LaBar and drummer Jim Drnec joined the band.

Cinderella is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 12th animated feature film Cinderella (1950). The character subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video sequels Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (2002) and Cinderella III: A Twist in Time (2007). In the original film, Cinderella is voiced by American singer and actress Ilene Woods. For the sequels and subsequent film and television appearances, Woods was replaced by American actresses Jennifer Hale and Tami Tappan, who provide the character's speaking and singing voices respectively.

Based on the heroine of the French fairy tale by Charles Perrault.

Cinderella (Russian: Золушка, Zolushka) is a ballet, Op. 87, composed by Sergei Prokofiev to a scenario by Nikolai Volkov. It is one of his most popular and melodious compositions, and has inspired a great many choreographers since its inception. The piece was composed between 1940 and 1944. Part way through writing it he broke off to write his opera War and Peace. The premiere of Cinderella was conducted by Yuri Fayer on November 21, 1945, at the Bolshoi Theatre with choreography by Rostislav Zakharov. Galina Ulanova danced the title role. Cinderella (or Cendrillon) is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery, and for the comic double-roles of the stepsisters (which can be performed in travesty), more mad than bad in this treatment.

Act 1

Debra Martin Chase
Robyn Crawford

Cinderella is a 1997 American romantic musical telefilm produced by Walt Disney Television. The film stars Brandy, Whitney Houston, Paolo Montalban, Bernadette Peters, Whoopi Goldberg, Victor Garber and Jason Alexander. It is a re-make of the Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella television movie musical, and the only one of the three versions to be shot on film. It was adapted by Robert L. Freedman and directed by Robert Iscove, with choreography by Rob Marshall, and was produced by Whitney Houston and Debra Martin Chase for Walt Disney Productions. It was part of a revival of The Wonderful World of Disney series, on Disney-owned ABC, and aired on November 2, 1997.

La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo (Cinderella, or Goodness Triumphant) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto was written by Jacopo Ferretti, based on the fairy tale Cendrillon by Charles Perrault. The opera was first performed in Rome's Teatro Valle on 25 January 1817.

Rossini composed La Cenerentola when he was 25 years old, following the success of The Barber of Seville the year before. La Cenerentola, which he completed in a period of three weeks, is considered to have some of his finest writing for solo voice and ensembles. Rossini saved some time by reusing an overture from La gazzetta and part of an aria from The Barber of Seville and by enlisting a collaborator, Luca Agolini, who wrote the secco recitatives and three numbers (Alidoro's "Vasto teatro è il mondo", Clorinda's "Sventurata!" and the chorus "Ah, della bella incognita.") The facsimile edition of the autograph has a different aria for Alidoro, "Fa' silenzio, odo un rumore"; this seems to have been added by an anonymous hand for a 1818 production. For a 1820 revival in Rome, Rossini wrote a bravura replacement, "La, del ciel nell'arcano profondo". The light, energetic overture has been in the standard repertoire since its premiere as La Cenerentola.

Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical in two acts with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and a book by Douglas Carter Beane based partly on Hammerstein's 1957 book. The story is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Verre, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into an elegant young lady and is able to attend the ball to meet her Prince, but, in this version, she must open the Prince's eyes to the injustice in his kingdom.

The 2013 adaptation is the musical's first Broadway production. The new book by Beane introduces several new characters, and the score features several new songs. The production stars Laura Osnes in the title role and Santino Fontana as The Prince. Rodgers and Hammerstein originally wrote the musical for a 1957 television broadcast starring Julie Andrews, and the show was subsequently remade twice for television. It was adapted for the stage in a number of versions prior to the Broadway production.

"Stealing Cinderella" is a debut song recorded by American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released in September 2007 as the first single from the album Starting Now. The song was co-written by Wicks along with songwriters George Teren and Rivers Rutherford. The single produced the biggest debut for any new country artist in all of 2007, with fifty-two Billboard-monitored stations in the United States adding the song in its first official week of airplay. Overall, the song peaked at #5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs charts.

On August 25, 2007, Wicks performed the song at his Grand Ole Opry debut. In October 2007, Wicks was invited by University of Tennessee football coach Phillip Fulmer to perform "Stealing Cinderella" at the wedding of Fulmer's daughter Courtney.

"Stealing Cinderella" is a debut song recorded by American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released in September 2007 as the first single from the album Starting Now. The song was co-written by Wicks along with songwriters George Teren and Rivers Rutherford. The single produced the biggest debut for any new country artist in all of 2007, with fifty-two Billboard-monitored stations in the United States adding the song in its first official week of airplay. Overall, the song peaked at #5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs charts.

On August 25, 2007, Wicks performed the song at his Grand Ole Opry debut. In October 2007, Wicks was invited by University of Tennessee football coach Phillip Fulmer to perform "Stealing Cinderella" at the wedding of Fulmer's daughter Courtney.

Starting Now is the debut album of American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released on January 22, 2008. The album debuted at number 24 on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart, selling about 20,000 copies in its first week. Wicks co-wrote all but one of the songs.

"Stealing Cinderella", which was released as the album's lead-off single on in September 2007, was a Top 5 hit on the Hot Country Songs charts. The album produced two more Top 40 hits with "All I Ever Wanted" and "Man of the House".

"All I Ever Wanted" is a song recorded by American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released in April 2008 as the second single from his debut album Starting Now. Wicks co-wrote the song with Anna Wilson and Monty Powell.

The music video was directed by Kristin Barlowe and premiered in July 2008.

Melvern Rivers Rutherford II is an American country music songwriter. Active since the mid-1990s as a songwriter, he has written several number one country hits, including "Ain't Nothing 'bout You" by Brooks & Dunn, which was the Number One country song of 2001 according to Billboard. Among the other Number Ones that he has composed are "If You Ever Stop Loving Me" by Montgomery Gentry, "When I Get Where I'm Going" by Brad Paisley and Dolly Parton, "Real Good Man" by Tim McGraw, "Living in Fast Forward" by Kenny Chesney, "Ladies Love Country Boys" by Trace Adkins, and "These Are My People" by Rodney Atkins. He has also released a solo CD called Just Another Coaster.

Top 40 country singles co-written by Rivers Rutherford:

Charles Elliott "Chuck" Wicks (born June 20, 1979) is an American country music artist. He was one of the participants on the American reality series Nashville, which aired on Fox for two episodes before its cancellation in mid-2007. In late 2007, he signed to RCA Records Nashville as a recording artist, with his debut single "Stealing Cinderella" being released in September of that year. It served as the lead-off to his debut album Starting Now, which was released in January 2008. "All I Ever Wanted" and "Man of the House" were released as the album's second and third singles, respectively, and both have charted in the Top 40 as well.

Chuck Wicks was born in the community of Smyrna, Delaware, where he was raised on a potato farm. In January 2009, his charity concert in his hometown of Smyrna raised $25,000 for the Smyrna-Clayton Boys and Girls Club.

WYAY is a 77,000 watt Atlanta FM radio station that broadcasts an all-news format. Its city of license is Gainesville, Georgia, northeast of Atlanta, but the station moved in toward the metro area in early 1985.

WYAY is a class C FM radio station; the FCC allows class C FM's to broadcast with a maximum ERP of 100,000 watts and an antenna height of 600 meters above average terrain (HAAT).

Cinderella

Cinderella is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 12th animated feature film Cinderella (1950). The character subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video sequels Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (2002) and Cinderella III: A Twist in Time (2007). In the original film, Cinderella is voiced by American singer and actress Ilene Woods. For the sequels and subsequent film and television appearances, Woods was replaced by American actresses Jennifer Hale and Tami Tappan, who provide the character's speaking and singing voices respectively.

Based on the heroine of the French fairy tale by Charles Perrault.

The following are fictional characters from Disney's 1950 film Cinderella and its sequels.

Jaq (real name Jacques) and Gus (real name Octavius) are two mice who serve as Cinderella's sidekicks. Gus has a penchant for cheese and fine wine.

This article is a list of fictional characters in the Vertigo comic book series Fables, Jack of Fables, Cinderella: From Fabletown with Love, Cinderella: Fables Are Forever and Fairest, published by DC Comics.

Having reformed from his violent ways, Bigby (aka the Big Bad Wolf, Gaffer Wolf) became the cigarette-smoking, trench coat-clad sheriff of Fabletown. He is extremely cunning and resourceful, in addition to being an excellent detective. Due to Snow White's possession of a lycanthropy-stained knife, he is now a werewolf and can change between wolf form, human form and an intermediate "wolfman" stage at will (in "The Great Fables Crossover", it is revealed that Bigby's nature as one of the North Wind's sons allows him to change forms at will - even without Snow White's magic knife - though he favors wolf, man and wolfman forms). He is the son of the North Wind, and, as such, has some control over the lower-tier winds, plus the "huff and puff" of legend. Despite his reformation, he can still be vicious if he believes the situation calls for it. He developed feelings for Snow White and the two have a litter of seven children together. He quit his position as the Sheriff some time ago (due to the election of Prince Charming as Mayor, whom he despises), and left Fabletown altogether. He has since returned and married Snow and now lives with her and their cubs on a specially set-aside area of land up at the Farm. In "The Destiny Game", Bigby forces The Lady Of The Lake to change his fate. Though he does not know the specific details (nor does he bother to inquire about them), this is his new fate : he will never grow old, but he will continue to grow in strength and power, fall in love with Snow White (a woman strong in wild magic, who will eventually confess her love for him), father seven children ("sons" and "daughters" - which implies Ghost is either male or female, not gender-neutral) - gods and monsters (in fact, part-gods, due to their North Wind grandfather and monsters, due to their wolf nature) who will lay waste to worlds (implying all of his cubs will do terrible things, eventually - though this is contradicted by Dare's suicide, for a noble cause, before he had committed any monstrous deed of any kind at all). Also, once he has died seven times, he will outlive all of his cubs (though this may only be metaphorical, as the exact nature of these words is unknown). So far, it is unknown how often Bigby has already died (if at all) - nor is it known if being shot by Goldilocks and gravely wounded, along with Little Boy Blue, during the war count as deaths. However, since one of his cubs is in a relationship with the enchantress who altered his previous fate, even this current fate may or may not be changed later (though this is, at this time, pure speculation).

Charles Elliott "Chuck" Wicks (born June 20, 1979) is an American country music artist. He was one of the participants on the American reality series Nashville, which aired on Fox for two episodes before its cancellation in mid-2007. In late 2007, he signed to RCA Records Nashville as a recording artist, with his debut single "Stealing Cinderella" being released in September of that year. It served as the lead-off to his debut album Starting Now, which was released in January 2008. "All I Ever Wanted" and "Man of the House" were released as the album's second and third singles, respectively, and both have charted in the Top 40 as well.

Chuck Wicks was born in the community of Smyrna, Delaware, where he was raised on a potato farm. In January 2009, his charity concert in his hometown of Smyrna raised $25,000 for the Smyrna-Clayton Boys and Girls Club.

Charles Elliott "Chuck" Wicks (born June 20, 1979) is an American country music artist. He was one of the participants on the American reality series Nashville, which aired on Fox for two episodes before its cancellation in mid-2007. In late 2007, he signed to RCA Records Nashville as a recording artist, with his debut single "Stealing Cinderella" being released in September of that year. It served as the lead-off to his debut album Starting Now, which was released in January 2008. "All I Ever Wanted" and "Man of the House" were released as the album's second and third singles, respectively, and both have charted in the Top 40 as well.

Chuck Wicks was born in the community of Smyrna, Delaware, where he was raised on a potato farm. In January 2009, his charity concert in his hometown of Smyrna raised $25,000 for the Smyrna-Clayton Boys and Girls Club.

"All I Ever Wanted" is a song recorded by American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released in April 2008 as the second single from his debut album Starting Now. Wicks co-wrote the song with Anna Wilson and Monty Powell.

The music video was directed by Kristin Barlowe and premiered in July 2008.

Julianne Alexandra Hough (/ˈhʌf/; born July 20, 1988) is an American professional ballroom dancer, country music singer, and actress. She is a two-time professional champion of ABC's Dancing with the Stars. She was nominated for Creative Arts Primetime Emmy in 2007 for outstanding choreography. Hough was signed to Mercury Nashville Records in December 2007. Her self-titled debut album was released May 20, 2008, debuting at No. 1 on the Billboard Country Album chart and No. 3 on the Billboard 200. It sold 67,000 copies its first week, and has sold over 320,000 total copies. On October 12, 2008, she released a holiday album, Sounds of the Season: The Julianne Hough Holiday Collection, which as of January 5, 2009, had sold 157,000 copies. Her first leading role was in the 2011 film remake of Footloose. She also starred in the 2013 romantic drama film Safe Haven.

"Stealing Cinderella" is a debut song recorded by American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released in September 2007 as the first single from the album Starting Now. The song was co-written by Wicks along with songwriters George Teren and Rivers Rutherford. The single produced the biggest debut for any new country artist in all of 2007, with fifty-two Billboard-monitored stations in the United States adding the song in its first official week of airplay. Overall, the song peaked at #5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot Country Songs charts.

On August 25, 2007, Wicks performed the song at his Grand Ole Opry debut. In October 2007, Wicks was invited by University of Tennessee football coach Phillip Fulmer to perform "Stealing Cinderella" at the wedding of Fulmer's daughter Courtney.

Starting Now is the debut album of American country music artist Chuck Wicks. It was released on January 22, 2008. The album debuted at number 24 on the U.S. Billboard 200 chart, selling about 20,000 copies in its first week. Wicks co-wrote all but one of the songs.

"Stealing Cinderella", which was released as the album's lead-off single on in September 2007, was a Top 5 hit on the Hot Country Songs charts. The album produced two more Top 40 hits with "All I Ever Wanted" and "Man of the House".

Melvern Rivers Rutherford II is an American country music songwriter. Active since the mid-1990s as a songwriter, he has written several number one country hits, including "Ain't Nothing 'bout You" by Brooks & Dunn, which was the Number One country song of 2001 according to Billboard. Among the other Number Ones that he has composed are "If You Ever Stop Loving Me" by Montgomery Gentry, "When I Get Where I'm Going" by Brad Paisley and Dolly Parton, "Real Good Man" by Tim McGraw, "Living in Fast Forward" by Kenny Chesney, "Ladies Love Country Boys" by Trace Adkins, and "These Are My People" by Rodney Atkins. He has also released a solo CD called Just Another Coaster.

Top 40 country singles co-written by Rivers Rutherford:

Marcel Francois Chagnon (born February 9, 1975) is an American country music singer and songwriter known by the singular name Marcel. Signed to Mercury Nashville Records in 2003, he released his debut album You, Me, and the Windshield that year and charted on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts with the single "Country Rock Star". Five years later, he signed to Lyric Street Records and released the single "I Love This Song", which has also charted. In addition, he has written two singles for Josh Gracin and two for his wife, Jessica Andrews.

Born in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, Marcel was a professional hockey player until signing with Mercury Nashville Records in 2002. For four years prior to this, while waiting for an opportunity, he sang at clubs, bars, and waited tables for extra money.

This is a list of notable events in country music that took place in the year 2008.

The following songs placed within the Top 20 on the Hot Country Songs charts in 2008:

All I Ever Wanted

Below is a list of notable country performers alphabetically by period, with each listing followed by a description of the artists' work.

Cinderella Cinderella

Cinderella is a 1950 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by RKO Radio Pictures. Based on the fairy tale "Cendrillon" by Charles Perrault. Twelfth in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film released on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. Directing credits go to Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske and Wilfred Jackson. Songs were written by Mack David, Jerry Livingston, and Al Hoffman. Songs in the film include "A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes", "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo", "So This Is Love", "Sing Sweet Nightingale", "The Work Song", and "Cinderella".

Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical written for television, with music by Richard Rodgers and a book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Vair, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother and self-centered stepsisters, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into a Princess and finds her Prince.

Cinderella is the only Rodgers and Hammerstein musical written for television. It was originally broadcast live on CBS on March 31, 1957 as a vehicle for Julie Andrews, who played the title role. The broadcast was viewed by more than 100 million people. It was subsequently remade for television twice, in 1965 and 1997. The 1965 version starred Lesley Ann Warren, and the 1997 one starred Brandy Norwood in the title role. Both remakes add songs from other Richard Rodgers musicals.

In American and Canadian sports, a Cinderella or "Cinderella Story" refers to a team or player who advances much further in a tournament or career than originally anticipated.]citation needed[ Cinderellas tend to gain much media and fan attention as they move closer to the championship game at the end of the tournament.]citation needed[ The term comes from the fairy tale Cinderella, in which the protagonist is the honored guest at a party to the surprise of everyone. The term has been used at least since 1939, but came into widespread usage in 1950, in reference to City College of New York, the unexpected winners of the NCAA Men's Basketball championship that year. The term was used by Bill Murray in the 1980 hit movie Caddyshack where he pretends as the announcer to his own golf fantasy: "Cinderella story. Outta nowhere. A former greenskeeper, now, about to become the Masters champion."

Referring somewhat inaccurately to the plot details of the classic Cinderella story, the media will debate whether the given "Cinderella" team or player will "turn into a pumpkin," i.e. fail to win the prize and then return to its former obscurity. In the fairy tale, it was the carriage that turned into a pumpkin at midnight, not Cinderella herself. Another popular term is "strike midnight," when a Cinderella team does finally get beaten.

Cinderella is an American glam metal band from Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania. They emerged in the mid-1980s with a series of multi-platinum albums and hit singles whose music videos received heavy MTV rotation. They were famous for being a glam metal band, but then shifted over towards a more hard rock/blues-rock sound. By the mid-1990s, the band's popularity declined severely due to personal setbacks, break-ups, and changes in the music industry. Nonetheless, after a hiatus the band reunited and is still active at present. The band has sold 15 million albums worldwide, according to Tom Keifer's official website.

Cinderella was formed in Clifton Heights in 1983 by singer-songwriter, keyboardist, and guitarist Tom Keifer and bassist Eric Brittingham. The initial lineup also included guitarist Michael Smerick and drummer Tony Destra. In 1985, Smerick and Destra left to form Britny Fox, another Philadelphia-based glam metal band that later relocated to Los Angeles. Cinderella got their big break when Jon Bon Jovi saw them perform at the Empire Rock Club in Philadelphia and recommended that his A&R rep Derek Shulman who knew of the band, see them as well. In 1985, with a recording contract with Mercury/Polygram Records in the works, guitarist Jeff LaBar and drummer Jim Drnec joined the band.

Cinderella is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 12th animated feature film Cinderella (1950). The character subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video sequels Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (2002) and Cinderella III: A Twist in Time (2007). In the original film, Cinderella is voiced by American singer and actress Ilene Woods. For the sequels and subsequent film and television appearances, Woods was replaced by American actresses Jennifer Hale and Tami Tappan, who provide the character's speaking and singing voices respectively.

Based on the heroine of the French fairy tale by Charles Perrault.

Cinderella (Russian: Золушка, Zolushka) is a ballet, Op. 87, composed by Sergei Prokofiev to a scenario by Nikolai Volkov. It is one of his most popular and melodious compositions, and has inspired a great many choreographers since its inception. The piece was composed between 1940 and 1944. Part way through writing it he broke off to write his opera War and Peace. The premiere of Cinderella was conducted by Yuri Fayer on November 21, 1945, at the Bolshoi Theatre with choreography by Rostislav Zakharov. Galina Ulanova danced the title role. Cinderella (or Cendrillon) is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery, and for the comic double-roles of the stepsisters (which can be performed in travesty), more mad than bad in this treatment.

Act 1

Debra Martin Chase
Robyn Crawford

Cinderella is a 1997 American romantic musical telefilm produced by Walt Disney Television. The film stars Brandy, Whitney Houston, Paolo Montalban, Bernadette Peters, Whoopi Goldberg, Victor Garber and Jason Alexander. It is a re-make of the Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella television movie musical, and the only one of the three versions to be shot on film. It was adapted by Robert L. Freedman and directed by Robert Iscove, with choreography by Rob Marshall, and was produced by Whitney Houston and Debra Martin Chase for Walt Disney Productions. It was part of a revival of The Wonderful World of Disney series, on Disney-owned ABC, and aired on November 2, 1997.

La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo (Cinderella, or Goodness Triumphant) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto was written by Jacopo Ferretti, based on the fairy tale Cendrillon by Charles Perrault. The opera was first performed in Rome's Teatro Valle on 25 January 1817.

Rossini composed La Cenerentola when he was 25 years old, following the success of The Barber of Seville the year before. La Cenerentola, which he completed in a period of three weeks, is considered to have some of his finest writing for solo voice and ensembles. Rossini saved some time by reusing an overture from La gazzetta and part of an aria from The Barber of Seville and by enlisting a collaborator, Luca Agolini, who wrote the secco recitatives and three numbers (Alidoro's "Vasto teatro è il mondo", Clorinda's "Sventurata!" and the chorus "Ah, della bella incognita.") The facsimile edition of the autograph has a different aria for Alidoro, "Fa' silenzio, odo un rumore"; this seems to have been added by an anonymous hand for a 1818 production. For a 1820 revival in Rome, Rossini wrote a bravura replacement, "La, del ciel nell'arcano profondo". The light, energetic overture has been in the standard repertoire since its premiere as La Cenerentola.

Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical in two acts with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and a book by Douglas Carter Beane based partly on Hammerstein's 1957 book. The story is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Verre, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into an elegant young lady and is able to attend the ball to meet her Prince, but, in this version, she must open the Prince's eyes to the injustice in his kingdom.

The 2013 adaptation is the musical's first Broadway production. The new book by Beane introduces several new characters, and the score features several new songs. The production stars Laura Osnes in the title role and Santino Fontana as The Prince. Rodgers and Hammerstein originally wrote the musical for a 1957 television broadcast starring Julie Andrews, and the show was subsequently remade twice for television. It was adapted for the stage in a number of versions prior to the Broadway production.

A pillow fight is a common game mostly played by young children (but also by teens and adults) in which they engage in mock physical conflict, using pillows as weapons.

Many times pillow fights occur during children's sleepovers. Since pillows are often soft, injuries rarely occur. The heft of a pillow can still knock a young person off balance, especially on a soft surface such as a bed, which is a common venue. A useful technique in a pillow fight is to bundle the nibs.]clarification needed[ In earlier eras, pillows would often break, shedding feathers throughout a room. Modern pillows tend to be stronger and are often filled with a solid block of artificial filling, so breakage occurs far less frequently.

A pillow fight is a common game mostly played by young children (but also by teens and adults) in which they engage in mock physical conflict, using pillows as weapons.

Many times pillow fights occur during children's sleepovers. Since pillows are often soft, injuries rarely occur. The heft of a pillow can still knock a young person off balance, especially on a soft surface such as a bed, which is a common venue. A useful technique in a pillow fight is to bundle the nibs.]clarification needed[ In earlier eras, pillows would often break, shedding feathers throughout a room. Modern pillows tend to be stronger and are often filled with a solid block of artificial filling, so breakage occurs far less frequently.

Many types of wrestling matches, sometimes called "concept" or "gimmick matches" in the jargon of the business, are performed in professional wrestling. Some of them occur relatively frequently, while others are developed so as to advance an angle, and such match types are used rarely. Because professional wrestling's long history over decades, many things have been recycled (many match types often being variations of previous match types). These match types can be organized into several loose groups. The following is a list of common or otherwise notable match types.

A pillow fight flash mob is a social phenomenon of flash mobbing and shares many characteristics of a culture jam.

The flash mob version of massive pillow fights is distinguished by the fact that nearly all of the promotion is Internet-based. These events occur around the world, some taking the name Pillow Fight Club, a reference to Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk in which anyone could join and fight as long as they fought by the rules. Both the London and Vancouver Pillow Fight Club's rules reflect that described in the book and feature film.

New Pillow Fight

The Pillow Fight League (PFL) is a Toronto-based semi-professional sports league centered around public pillow fights. The tongue in cheek women's sport is hosted in a fighting arena, much like a boxing or wrestling match. The League was founded by PFL Commissioner Stacey P. Case, and Honorary PFL Commissioner Craig Daniels in February 2004. The formal league launched at a Canadian goth bar called The Vatikan in downtown Toronto. Events since then have been hosted in both Montreal, Quebec and New York City, but the primary seat of the League remains in Toronto, Ontario. Fighter Abbie Roadkill, originally of British descent, recently speculated about a similar event in the United Kingdom.

Fights within the League now feature either two or three girls, the latter referred to as a damage à trois, and a codified set of rules. Fighters frequently incur cuts, scrapes and bruises. There have also been more serious injuries, including concussions, black eyes, lost teeth, split lips, torn muscles, and bruised kidneys.

A flash mob (or flashmob) is a group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and seemingly pointless act for a brief time, then quickly disperse, often for the purposes of entertainment, satire, and artistic expression. Flash mobs are organized via telecommunications, social media, or viral emails.

The term, coined in 2003, is generally not applied to events and performances organized for the purposes of politics (such as protests), commercial advertisement, publicity stunts that involve public relation firms, or paid professionals. In these cases of a planned purpose for the social activity in question, the term smart mobs is often applied instead.



Pillow

Guy Gilchrist (born January 30, 1957) is an American cartoonist. He has worked on Nancy, Your Angels Speak, Night Lights & Pillow Fights, Screams, The Poetry Guy, The Muppets and The Rock Channel. As of 2013, he writes and draws Nancy and Today's Dogg.

Gilchrist started his comics career in the late 1970s with Superkernel Comics, a monthly comic book published by Weekly Reader Books in Middletown, Connecticut. He also created the comic strip Mudpie [1].

Diva is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), an American professional wrestling promotion, to refer to its female talent. The term is applied to women who appear as wrestlers, managers or valets, backstage interviewers, or ring announcers.

After winning the NWA Women's Title in 1956 from Judy Grable, the Fabulous Moolah defected to the WWF in 1983. Moolah, who was the NWA Women's Champion and legal owner of the title, joined the WWF including selling them the rights to the title after they would disaffiliate from the NWA and recognized her as the first WWF Women's Champion. Additionally, the WWF also recognized Moolah's reign at the time as a continuation of her first NWA World Women's Championship reign, which occurred in 1956, resulting in the promotion not recognizing other reigns that occurred during the title's existence in the NWA. Thus, The Fabulous Moolah's reign was considered to have lasted 27 years by the promotion. This time period during the early 1980s saw the introduction of many female wrestlers who competed with the promotion. WWF also introduced the WWF Women's Tag Team Championship with Velvet McIntyre and Princess Victoria recognized as the first champions after also defecting from the NWA. The following year, music artist Cyndi Lauper began a verbal feud with manager "Captain" Lou Albano, who long had a reputation of being a villain; this brought professional wrestling into mainstream culture in a storyline that became known as the "Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection". When it was finally time for Lauper and Albano to settle their differences in the ring, a match-up was scheduled with Albano representing Moolah against the challenge of Lauper's protégé, Wendi Richter. This led to Moolah losing the title at The Brawl to End It All, broadcast live on MTV. Richter would then lose the title to Leilani Kai the following year but would win it back at Wrestlemania 1 (March 31, 1985).

Prince Charming is a stock character who appears in a number of fairy tales. He is the prince who comes to the rescue of the damsel in distress, and stereotypically, must engage in a quest to liberate her from an evil spell. This classification suits most heroes of a number of traditional folk tales, including Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, even if in the original story they were given another name, or no name at all.

These characters are often handsome and romantic, a foil to the heroine, and are seldom deeply characterized, or even distinguishable from other such men who marry the heroine.

Prince Charming is a stock character who appears in a number of fairy tales. He is the prince who comes to the rescue of the damsel in distress, and stereotypically, must engage in a quest to liberate her from an evil spell. This classification suits most heroes of a number of traditional folk tales, including Snow White, Sleeping Beauty and Cinderella, even if in the original story they were given another name, or no name at all.

These characters are often handsome and romantic, a foil to the heroine, and are seldom deeply characterized, or even distinguishable from other such men who marry the heroine.


This is a list of characters that appear in the Shrek franchise.

Prince Charming was a UK number one single for four weeks in September 1981 for Adam and the Ants, featured on the album of the same name. Written by Marco Pirroni and Adam Ant, it was their second number one single. Fellow band member and producer Merrick (Chris Hughes), normally on drums, played a stirring riff on an open-tuned acoustic guitar throughout the song; lead guitarist Pirroni mimed to this part on both an orchestral harp and a miniature version of the instrument in the promotional video, which was based on the pantomime Cinderella.

The video was also notable for its extravagant production. It featured a swashbuckling Adam Ant, in flamboyant Regency clothes, performing a much imitated arm-crossing dance. Diana Dors, in one of her last on-screen performances, appeared in the video as a Fairy Godmother.

This article is a list of fictional characters in the Vertigo comic book series Fables, Jack of Fables, Cinderella: From Fabletown with Love, Cinderella: Fables Are Forever and Fairest, published by DC Comics.

Having reformed from his violent ways, Bigby (aka the Big Bad Wolf, Gaffer Wolf) became the cigarette-smoking, trench coat-clad sheriff of Fabletown. He is extremely cunning and resourceful, in addition to being an excellent detective. Due to Snow White's possession of a lycanthropy-stained knife, he is now a werewolf and can change between wolf form, human form and an intermediate "wolfman" stage at will (in "The Great Fables Crossover", it is revealed that Bigby's nature as one of the North Wind's sons allows him to change forms at will - even without Snow White's magic knife - though he favors wolf, man and wolfman forms). He is the son of the North Wind, and, as such, has some control over the lower-tier winds, plus the "huff and puff" of legend. Despite his reformation, he can still be vicious if he believes the situation calls for it. He developed feelings for Snow White and the two have a litter of seven children together. He quit his position as the Sheriff some time ago (due to the election of Prince Charming as Mayor, whom he despises), and left Fabletown altogether. He has since returned and married Snow and now lives with her and their cubs on a specially set-aside area of land up at the Farm. In "The Destiny Game", Bigby forces The Lady Of The Lake to change his fate. Though he does not know the specific details (nor does he bother to inquire about them), this is his new fate : he will never grow old, but he will continue to grow in strength and power, fall in love with Snow White (a woman strong in wild magic, who will eventually confess her love for him), father seven children ("sons" and "daughters" - which implies Ghost is either male or female, not gender-neutral) - gods and monsters (in fact, part-gods, due to their North Wind grandfather and monsters, due to their wolf nature) who will lay waste to worlds (implying all of his cubs will do terrible things, eventually - though this is contradicted by Dare's suicide, for a noble cause, before he had committed any monstrous deed of any kind at all). Also, once he has died seven times, he will outlive all of his cubs (though this may only be metaphorical, as the exact nature of these words is unknown). So far, it is unknown how often Bigby has already died (if at all) - nor is it known if being shot by Goldilocks and gravely wounded, along with Little Boy Blue, during the war count as deaths. However, since one of his cubs is in a relationship with the enchantress who altered his previous fate, even this current fate may or may not be changed later (though this is, at this time, pure speculation).

The following are fictional characters from Disney's 1950 film Cinderella and its sequels.

Jaq (real name Jacques) and Gus (real name Octavius) are two mice who serve as Cinderella's sidekicks. Gus has a penchant for cheese and fine wine.

Prince Charming is the third and final album by Adam and the Ants, released in 1981 (see 1981 in music). Unlike Kings of the Wild Frontier, Prince Charming showed the Ants moving away from their earlier Burundi drum style. This album features former Roxy Music bass player Gary Tibbs in place of Kevin Mooney, the bassist from Kings of the Wild Frontier. The album spawned the two number-one singles "Stand and Deliver" and "Prince Charming" plus a remixed version of the Top-Ten single "Ant Rap". The album was remastered and reissued in 2004 with several demo tracks.

The song "Prince Charming" has musical similarities to Rolf Harris' 1965 song "War Canoe", and in March 2010 Harris claimed on BBC Radio 5live's Danny Baker Show that an out-of-court settlement had been reached and a large sum of royalties received after a musicologist had found the two songs to be musically identical.

Prince Charming is a 2001 made-for-television film. It is a comical fairy tale, relating the story of a Prince who is cursed and transported to present-day New York City. The movie stars Martin Short as a wizard squire of modest talents trying to keep his prince (Sean Maguire) from harm, with Christina Applegate as a young woman skeptical of the prince's story, who nevertheless wins his love, and Bernadette Peters as an actress who inadvertently lifts a 500-year curse.

On his wedding day, Prince John commits a romantic indiscretion and is cursed by being turned into a frog forever, unless a woman kisses him and marries him within a week. For good measure, his squire Rodney is similarly "frogged".

Prince Charming is the stock character of fairy tales.

Prince Charming may also refer to:

Prince Charming Regal Carrousel (formerly Cinderella's Golden Carrousel) is an authentic carousel ride at Magic Kingdom at Walt Disney World Resort. Similar attractions under varying names can be found at two other Disney Parks including Tokyo Disneyland and Hong Kong Disneyland. This 90-horse carousel plays organ-based Disney classics during the two-minute ride period. Hand painted scenes from Disney's Cinderella can be seen on the ride.

Prince Charming (プリンスチャーミング Purinsuchāmingu?) is a Japanese manga written and illustrated by Akemi Takaido. It is licensed in North America by Digital Manga Publishing, which released the first volume through its imprint June, on 24 October 2007, the second volume on 15 January 2008, and the last volume on 22 April 2008.

Leroy Douresseaux recommends the first volume to "readers who enjoy fiction set in the modern hook-up culture". Holly Ellingwood enjoyed Yuasa's "unkempt" character design. Briana Lawrence enjoyed the complexities of the story, despite not enjoying the art and not looking forward to a story featuring a student/teacher relationship. Writing about the second volume, she said "I cannot stress enough how great these characters are. Each one is believable and I’m in love with every single one of them. The plot is so… real!" For Leroy Douresseaux, the second volume "never really comes together", feeling more like "a collection of scenes" than a sustained narrative. Holly Ellingwood felt the second volume was "a great change of pace from the regular yaoi manga with its unexpected turns and unique comedic take on the situation of these four men". Briana Lawrence found some aspects of the ending disappointing, especially characters conveniently disappearing. Leroy Douressaux feels the final volume "has more talking than it does coupling" and compares it to Friends. Rachel Bentham felt Asahina was entertaining in the final volume because of his "backwards way of saying 'I love you'".

Cinderella Cinderella

Cinderella is a 1950 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by RKO Radio Pictures. Based on the fairy tale "Cendrillon" by Charles Perrault. Twelfth in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film released on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. Directing credits go to Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske and Wilfred Jackson. Songs were written by Mack David, Jerry Livingston, and Al Hoffman. Songs in the film include "A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes", "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo", "So This Is Love", "Sing Sweet Nightingale", "The Work Song", and "Cinderella".

Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical written for television, with music by Richard Rodgers and a book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Vair, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother and self-centered stepsisters, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into a Princess and finds her Prince.

Cinderella is the only Rodgers and Hammerstein musical written for television. It was originally broadcast live on CBS on March 31, 1957 as a vehicle for Julie Andrews, who played the title role. The broadcast was viewed by more than 100 million people. It was subsequently remade for television twice, in 1965 and 1997. The 1965 version starred Lesley Ann Warren, and the 1997 one starred Brandy Norwood in the title role. Both remakes add songs from other Richard Rodgers musicals.

In American and Canadian sports, a Cinderella or "Cinderella Story" refers to a team or player who advances much further in a tournament or career than originally anticipated.]citation needed[ Cinderellas tend to gain much media and fan attention as they move closer to the championship game at the end of the tournament.]citation needed[ The term comes from the fairy tale Cinderella, in which the protagonist is the honored guest at a party to the surprise of everyone. The term has been used at least since 1939, but came into widespread usage in 1950, in reference to City College of New York, the unexpected winners of the NCAA Men's Basketball championship that year. The term was used by Bill Murray in the 1980 hit movie Caddyshack where he pretends as the announcer to his own golf fantasy: "Cinderella story. Outta nowhere. A former greenskeeper, now, about to become the Masters champion."

Referring somewhat inaccurately to the plot details of the classic Cinderella story, the media will debate whether the given "Cinderella" team or player will "turn into a pumpkin," i.e. fail to win the prize and then return to its former obscurity. In the fairy tale, it was the carriage that turned into a pumpkin at midnight, not Cinderella herself. Another popular term is "strike midnight," when a Cinderella team does finally get beaten.

Cinderella is an American glam metal band from Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania. They emerged in the mid-1980s with a series of multi-platinum albums and hit singles whose music videos received heavy MTV rotation. They were famous for being a glam metal band, but then shifted over towards a more hard rock/blues-rock sound. By the mid-1990s, the band's popularity declined severely due to personal setbacks, break-ups, and changes in the music industry. Nonetheless, after a hiatus the band reunited and is still active at present. The band has sold 15 million albums worldwide, according to Tom Keifer's official website.

Cinderella was formed in Clifton Heights in 1983 by singer-songwriter, keyboardist, and guitarist Tom Keifer and bassist Eric Brittingham. The initial lineup also included guitarist Michael Smerick and drummer Tony Destra. In 1985, Smerick and Destra left to form Britny Fox, another Philadelphia-based glam metal band that later relocated to Los Angeles. Cinderella got their big break when Jon Bon Jovi saw them perform at the Empire Rock Club in Philadelphia and recommended that his A&R rep Derek Shulman who knew of the band, see them as well. In 1985, with a recording contract with Mercury/Polygram Records in the works, guitarist Jeff LaBar and drummer Jim Drnec joined the band.

Cinderella is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 12th animated feature film Cinderella (1950). The character subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video sequels Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (2002) and Cinderella III: A Twist in Time (2007). In the original film, Cinderella is voiced by American singer and actress Ilene Woods. For the sequels and subsequent film and television appearances, Woods was replaced by American actresses Jennifer Hale and Tami Tappan, who provide the character's speaking and singing voices respectively.

Based on the heroine of the French fairy tale by Charles Perrault.

Cinderella (Russian: Золушка, Zolushka) is a ballet, Op. 87, composed by Sergei Prokofiev to a scenario by Nikolai Volkov. It is one of his most popular and melodious compositions, and has inspired a great many choreographers since its inception. The piece was composed between 1940 and 1944. Part way through writing it he broke off to write his opera War and Peace. The premiere of Cinderella was conducted by Yuri Fayer on November 21, 1945, at the Bolshoi Theatre with choreography by Rostislav Zakharov. Galina Ulanova danced the title role. Cinderella (or Cendrillon) is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery, and for the comic double-roles of the stepsisters (which can be performed in travesty), more mad than bad in this treatment.

Act 1

Debra Martin Chase
Robyn Crawford

Cinderella is a 1997 American romantic musical telefilm produced by Walt Disney Television. The film stars Brandy, Whitney Houston, Paolo Montalban, Bernadette Peters, Whoopi Goldberg, Victor Garber and Jason Alexander. It is a re-make of the Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella television movie musical, and the only one of the three versions to be shot on film. It was adapted by Robert L. Freedman and directed by Robert Iscove, with choreography by Rob Marshall, and was produced by Whitney Houston and Debra Martin Chase for Walt Disney Productions. It was part of a revival of The Wonderful World of Disney series, on Disney-owned ABC, and aired on November 2, 1997.

La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo (Cinderella, or Goodness Triumphant) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto was written by Jacopo Ferretti, based on the fairy tale Cendrillon by Charles Perrault. The opera was first performed in Rome's Teatro Valle on 25 January 1817.

Rossini composed La Cenerentola when he was 25 years old, following the success of The Barber of Seville the year before. La Cenerentola, which he completed in a period of three weeks, is considered to have some of his finest writing for solo voice and ensembles. Rossini saved some time by reusing an overture from La gazzetta and part of an aria from The Barber of Seville and by enlisting a collaborator, Luca Agolini, who wrote the secco recitatives and three numbers (Alidoro's "Vasto teatro è il mondo", Clorinda's "Sventurata!" and the chorus "Ah, della bella incognita.") The facsimile edition of the autograph has a different aria for Alidoro, "Fa' silenzio, odo un rumore"; this seems to have been added by an anonymous hand for a 1818 production. For a 1820 revival in Rome, Rossini wrote a bravura replacement, "La, del ciel nell'arcano profondo". The light, energetic overture has been in the standard repertoire since its premiere as La Cenerentola.

Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical in two acts with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and a book by Douglas Carter Beane based partly on Hammerstein's 1957 book. The story is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Verre, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into an elegant young lady and is able to attend the ball to meet her Prince, but, in this version, she must open the Prince's eyes to the injustice in his kingdom.

The 2013 adaptation is the musical's first Broadway production. The new book by Beane introduces several new characters, and the score features several new songs. The production stars Laura Osnes in the title role and Santino Fontana as The Prince. Rodgers and Hammerstein originally wrote the musical for a 1957 television broadcast starring Julie Andrews, and the show was subsequently remade twice for television. It was adapted for the stage in a number of versions prior to the Broadway production.

Cinderella Cinderella

Cinderella is a 1950 American animated musical fantasy film produced by Walt Disney Animation Studios and released by RKO Radio Pictures. Based on the fairy tale "Cendrillon" by Charles Perrault. Twelfth in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series, the film released on February 15, 1950 by RKO Radio Pictures. Directing credits go to Clyde Geronimi, Hamilton Luske and Wilfred Jackson. Songs were written by Mack David, Jerry Livingston, and Al Hoffman. Songs in the film include "A Dream Is a Wish Your Heart Makes", "Bibbidi-Bobbidi-Boo", "So This Is Love", "Sing Sweet Nightingale", "The Work Song", and "Cinderella".

Rodgers and Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical written for television, with music by Richard Rodgers and a book and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II. It is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Vair, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother and self-centered stepsisters, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into a Princess and finds her Prince.

Cinderella is the only Rodgers and Hammerstein musical written for television. It was originally broadcast live on CBS on March 31, 1957 as a vehicle for Julie Andrews, who played the title role. The broadcast was viewed by more than 100 million people. It was subsequently remade for television twice, in 1965 and 1997. The 1965 version starred Lesley Ann Warren, and the 1997 one starred Brandy Norwood in the title role. Both remakes add songs from other Richard Rodgers musicals.

In American and Canadian sports, a Cinderella or "Cinderella Story" refers to a team or player who advances much further in a tournament or career than originally anticipated.]citation needed[ Cinderellas tend to gain much media and fan attention as they move closer to the championship game at the end of the tournament.]citation needed[ The term comes from the fairy tale Cinderella, in which the protagonist is the honored guest at a party to the surprise of everyone. The term has been used at least since 1939, but came into widespread usage in 1950, in reference to City College of New York, the unexpected winners of the NCAA Men's Basketball championship that year. The term was used by Bill Murray in the 1980 hit movie Caddyshack where he pretends as the announcer to his own golf fantasy: "Cinderella story. Outta nowhere. A former greenskeeper, now, about to become the Masters champion."

Referring somewhat inaccurately to the plot details of the classic Cinderella story, the media will debate whether the given "Cinderella" team or player will "turn into a pumpkin," i.e. fail to win the prize and then return to its former obscurity. In the fairy tale, it was the carriage that turned into a pumpkin at midnight, not Cinderella herself. Another popular term is "strike midnight," when a Cinderella team does finally get beaten.

Cinderella is an American glam metal band from Clifton Heights, Pennsylvania. They emerged in the mid-1980s with a series of multi-platinum albums and hit singles whose music videos received heavy MTV rotation. They were famous for being a glam metal band, but then shifted over towards a more hard rock/blues-rock sound. By the mid-1990s, the band's popularity declined severely due to personal setbacks, break-ups, and changes in the music industry. Nonetheless, after a hiatus the band reunited and is still active at present. The band has sold 15 million albums worldwide, according to Tom Keifer's official website.

Cinderella was formed in Clifton Heights in 1983 by singer-songwriter, keyboardist, and guitarist Tom Keifer and bassist Eric Brittingham. The initial lineup also included guitarist Michael Smerick and drummer Tony Destra. In 1985, Smerick and Destra left to form Britny Fox, another Philadelphia-based glam metal band that later relocated to Los Angeles. Cinderella got their big break when Jon Bon Jovi saw them perform at the Empire Rock Club in Philadelphia and recommended that his A&R rep Derek Shulman who knew of the band, see them as well. In 1985, with a recording contract with Mercury/Polygram Records in the works, guitarist Jeff LaBar and drummer Jim Drnec joined the band.

Cinderella is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 12th animated feature film Cinderella (1950). The character subsequently appears in the film's two direct-to-video sequels Cinderella II: Dreams Come True (2002) and Cinderella III: A Twist in Time (2007). In the original film, Cinderella is voiced by American singer and actress Ilene Woods. For the sequels and subsequent film and television appearances, Woods was replaced by American actresses Jennifer Hale and Tami Tappan, who provide the character's speaking and singing voices respectively.

Based on the heroine of the French fairy tale by Charles Perrault.

Cinderella (Russian: Золушка, Zolushka) is a ballet, Op. 87, composed by Sergei Prokofiev to a scenario by Nikolai Volkov. It is one of his most popular and melodious compositions, and has inspired a great many choreographers since its inception. The piece was composed between 1940 and 1944. Part way through writing it he broke off to write his opera War and Peace. The premiere of Cinderella was conducted by Yuri Fayer on November 21, 1945, at the Bolshoi Theatre with choreography by Rostislav Zakharov. Galina Ulanova danced the title role. Cinderella (or Cendrillon) is notable for its jubilant music, lush scenery, and for the comic double-roles of the stepsisters (which can be performed in travesty), more mad than bad in this treatment.

Act 1

Debra Martin Chase
Robyn Crawford

Cinderella is a 1997 American romantic musical telefilm produced by Walt Disney Television. The film stars Brandy, Whitney Houston, Paolo Montalban, Bernadette Peters, Whoopi Goldberg, Victor Garber and Jason Alexander. It is a re-make of the Rodgers & Hammerstein's Cinderella television movie musical, and the only one of the three versions to be shot on film. It was adapted by Robert L. Freedman and directed by Robert Iscove, with choreography by Rob Marshall, and was produced by Whitney Houston and Debra Martin Chase for Walt Disney Productions. It was part of a revival of The Wonderful World of Disney series, on Disney-owned ABC, and aired on November 2, 1997.

La Cenerentola, ossia La bontà in trionfo (Cinderella, or Goodness Triumphant) is an operatic dramma giocoso in two acts by Gioachino Rossini. The libretto was written by Jacopo Ferretti, based on the fairy tale Cendrillon by Charles Perrault. The opera was first performed in Rome's Teatro Valle on 25 January 1817.

Rossini composed La Cenerentola when he was 25 years old, following the success of The Barber of Seville the year before. La Cenerentola, which he completed in a period of three weeks, is considered to have some of his finest writing for solo voice and ensembles. Rossini saved some time by reusing an overture from La gazzetta and part of an aria from The Barber of Seville and by enlisting a collaborator, Luca Agolini, who wrote the secco recitatives and three numbers (Alidoro's "Vasto teatro è il mondo", Clorinda's "Sventurata!" and the chorus "Ah, della bella incognita.") The facsimile edition of the autograph has a different aria for Alidoro, "Fa' silenzio, odo un rumore"; this seems to have been added by an anonymous hand for a 1818 production. For a 1820 revival in Rome, Rossini wrote a bravura replacement, "La, del ciel nell'arcano profondo". The light, energetic overture has been in the standard repertoire since its premiere as La Cenerentola.

Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella is a musical in two acts with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II and a book by Douglas Carter Beane based partly on Hammerstein's 1957 book. The story is based upon the fairy tale Cinderella, particularly the French version Cendrillon, ou la Petite Pantoufle de Verre, by Charles Perrault. The story concerns a young woman forced into a life of servitude by her cruel stepmother, who dreams of a better life. With the help of her Fairy Godmother, Cinderella is transformed into an elegant young lady and is able to attend the ball to meet her Prince, but, in this version, she must open the Prince's eyes to the injustice in his kingdom.

The 2013 adaptation is the musical's first Broadway production. The new book by Beane introduces several new characters, and the score features several new songs. The production stars Laura Osnes in the title role and Santino Fontana as The Prince. Rodgers and Hammerstein originally wrote the musical for a 1957 television broadcast starring Julie Andrews, and the show was subsequently remade twice for television. It was adapted for the stage in a number of versions prior to the Broadway production.

A pillow fight is a common game mostly played by young children (but also by teens and adults) in which they engage in mock physical conflict, using pillows as weapons.

Many times pillow fights occur during children's sleepovers. Since pillows are often soft, injuries rarely occur. The heft of a pillow can still knock a young person off balance, especially on a soft surface such as a bed, which is a common venue. A useful technique in a pillow fight is to bundle the nibs.]clarification needed[ In earlier eras, pillows would often break, shedding feathers throughout a room. Modern pillows tend to be stronger and are often filled with a solid block of artificial filling, so breakage occurs far less frequently.

A pillow fight is a common game mostly played by young children (but also by teens and adults) in which they engage in mock physical conflict, using pillows as weapons.

Many times pillow fights occur during children's sleepovers. Since pillows are often soft, injuries rarely occur. The heft of a pillow can still knock a young person off balance, especially on a soft surface such as a bed, which is a common venue. A useful technique in a pillow fight is to bundle the nibs.]clarification needed[ In earlier eras, pillows would often break, shedding feathers throughout a room. Modern pillows tend to be stronger and are often filled with a solid block of artificial filling, so breakage occurs far less frequently.

Many types of wrestling matches, sometimes called "concept" or "gimmick matches" in the jargon of the business, are performed in professional wrestling. Some of them occur relatively frequently, while others are developed so as to advance an angle, and such match types are used rarely. Because professional wrestling's long history over decades, many things have been recycled (many match types often being variations of previous match types). These match types can be organized into several loose groups. The following is a list of common or otherwise notable match types.

A pillow fight flash mob is a social phenomenon of flash mobbing and shares many characteristics of a culture jam.

The flash mob version of massive pillow fights is distinguished by the fact that nearly all of the promotion is Internet-based. These events occur around the world, some taking the name Pillow Fight Club, a reference to Fight Club by Chuck Palahniuk in which anyone could join and fight as long as they fought by the rules. Both the London and Vancouver Pillow Fight Club's rules reflect that described in the book and feature film.

New Pillow Fight

The Pillow Fight League (PFL) is a Toronto-based semi-professional sports league centered around public pillow fights. The tongue in cheek women's sport is hosted in a fighting arena, much like a boxing or wrestling match. The League was founded by PFL Commissioner Stacey P. Case, and Honorary PFL Commissioner Craig Daniels in February 2004. The formal league launched at a Canadian goth bar called The Vatikan in downtown Toronto. Events since then have been hosted in both Montreal, Quebec and New York City, but the primary seat of the League remains in Toronto, Ontario. Fighter Abbie Roadkill, originally of British descent, recently speculated about a similar event in the United Kingdom.

Fights within the League now feature either two or three girls, the latter referred to as a damage à trois, and a codified set of rules. Fighters frequently incur cuts, scrapes and bruises. There have also been more serious injuries, including concussions, black eyes, lost teeth, split lips, torn muscles, and bruised kidneys.

A flash mob (or flashmob) is a group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and seemingly pointless act for a brief time, then quickly disperse, often for the purposes of entertainment, satire, and artistic expression. Flash mobs are organized via telecommunications, social media, or viral emails.

The term, coined in 2003, is generally not applied to events and performances organized for the purposes of politics (such as protests), commercial advertisement, publicity stunts that involve public relation firms, or paid professionals. In these cases of a planned purpose for the social activity in question, the term smart mobs is often applied instead.



Pillow

Guy Gilchrist (born January 30, 1957) is an American cartoonist. He has worked on Nancy, Your Angels Speak, Night Lights & Pillow Fights, Screams, The Poetry Guy, The Muppets and The Rock Channel. As of 2013, he writes and draws Nancy and Today's Dogg.

Gilchrist started his comics career in the late 1970s with Superkernel Comics, a monthly comic book published by Weekly Reader Books in Middletown, Connecticut. He also created the comic strip Mudpie [1].

Diva is a term used by World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE), an American professional wrestling promotion, to refer to its female talent. The term is applied to women who appear as wrestlers, managers or valets, backstage interviewers, or ring announcers.

After winning the NWA Women's Title in 1956 from Judy Grable, the Fabulous Moolah defected to the WWF in 1983. Moolah, who was the NWA Women's Champion and legal owner of the title, joined the WWF including selling them the rights to the title after they would disaffiliate from the NWA and recognized her as the first WWF Women's Champion. Additionally, the WWF also recognized Moolah's reign at the time as a continuation of her first NWA World Women's Championship reign, which occurred in 1956, resulting in the promotion not recognizing other reigns that occurred during the title's existence in the NWA. Thus, The Fabulous Moolah's reign was considered to have lasted 27 years by the promotion. This time period during the early 1980s saw the introduction of many female wrestlers who competed with the promotion. WWF also introduced the WWF Women's Tag Team Championship with Velvet McIntyre and Princess Victoria recognized as the first champions after also defecting from the NWA. The following year, music artist Cyndi Lauper began a verbal feud with manager "Captain" Lou Albano, who long had a reputation of being a villain; this brought professional wrestling into mainstream culture in a storyline that became known as the "Rock 'n' Wrestling Connection". When it was finally time for Lauper and Albano to settle their differences in the ring, a match-up was scheduled with Albano representing Moolah against the challenge of Lauper's protégé, Wendi Richter. This led to Moolah losing the title at The Brawl to End It All, broadcast live on MTV. Richter would then lose the title to Leilani Kai the following year but would win it back at Wrestlemania 1 (March 31, 1985).

Literature Arts

The Brothers Grimm or Die Gebrüder Grimm), Jacob (1785–1863) and Wilhelm Grimm (1786–1859), were German academics, linguists, cultural researchers, lexicographers and authors who together collected and published folklore. They are among the most well-known storytellers of folk tales, popularizing stories such as "Cinderella" (Aschenputtel), "The Frog Prince" (Der Froschkönig), "Hansel and Gretel" (Hänsel und Gretel), "Rapunzel", "Rumpelstiltskin" (Rumpelstilzchen) and "Snow White" (Schneewittchen). Their first collection of folk tales, Children's and Household Tales (Kinder- und Hausmärchen), was published in 1812.

The brothers spent their formative years first in the German town of Hanau. Their father's death in 1796, (when Jacob was eleven and Wilhelm ten), caused great poverty for the family and affected the brothers for many years. They both attended the University of Marburg and at the same time developed a curiosity for folklore, which grew into a lifelong dedication to collecting German folk tales.

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