Question:

Who is winning the nascar race at Bristol?

Answer:

As of Lap 210 the standings are: 1 Kyle Busch 2 David Reutimann 3 Jimmie Johnson 4 Carl Edwards 5 Juan Pablo Montoya 6 Jeff Gordon 7 Ryan Newman 8 Matt Kenseth 9 Kurt Busch 10 Dale Earnhardt Jr.

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Ralph Dale Earnhardt, Jr. (born October 10, 1974) is an American stock car racing driver and team owner. He is the son of NASCAR Hall of Famer Dale Earnhardt, Sr. He is also the grandson of both NASCAR driver Ralph Earnhardt and stock car fabricator Robert Gee, the half-brother of former driver Kerry Earnhardt, the uncle of driver Jeffrey Earnhardt, the stepson of Earnhardt Ganassi Racing team co-owner Teresa Earnhardt and the older half-brother of Taylor Earnhardt-Putnam. Earnhardt, Jr. has won the Most Popular Driver Award ten times (consecutively from 2003-2012). He has an estimated net worth of $300 million.

He currently drives the No. 88 Chevrolet SS in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series for Hendrick Motorsports and drives the No. 88 Chevrolet Camaro for his own team, JR Motorsports, in selected events in the NASCAR Nationwide Series.

The Chase for the Sprint Cup, originally known as "The Chase for the Championship" during its creation, and then "The Chase for the Nextel Cup" (from 2004 to 2007) is the championship system used in NASCAR's top division, the Sprint Cup Series, akin to the postseason in American professional sports leagues. The Chase was announced on January 21, 2004, and first used during the 2004 Nextel Cup season. The format used from 2004 to 2006 was modified slightly starting with the 2007 season. Beginning with the 2008 Sprint Cup Series, the Chase became known by its new name as a result of the merger of Nextel Communications with Sprint Corporation. A major change to the qualifying criteria was instituted in 2011, along with a major change to the points system. As of 2011, the 10-race Chase pits the 10 drivers with the highest "regular season" points, plus the two drivers ranked between 11th and 20th in regular season points who have the most race wins, against each other, while racing in the standard field of 43 cars. The driver with the most points after the final 10 races is declared the champion.

The current version of the Chase was announced by NASCAR chairman and CEO Brian France on January 26, 2011. The current format marks a major change from the previous format announced January 22, 2007, which in turn modified the original Chase format announced on January 21, 2004. The 2011 change marks the 13th time since 1949 that the point system has been changed.

The Coca-Cola 600 is an annual 600-mile (965.606 km) NASCAR Sprint Cup Series points race held at the Charlotte Motor Speedway in Concord, North Carolina during Memorial Day weekend. The event, when first held in 1960, became the first race to be held at the Charlotte Motor Speedway. Run since 1960, it is the longest race sanctioned by NASCAR at 600 miles (956.606 km). It is also a race where it crosses between daylight, dusk and night time.

In the spring of 1959, Curtis Turner returned to Charlotte, North Carolina after viewing Bill France, Sr.'s Daytona International Speedway and had an idea of building a race track in the surrounding area. Turner thought he could borrow enough money to build a $750,000 track with 45,000 permanent seats on his property in Cabarrus County, North Carolina. Afterward, he learned that a group led by Bruton Smith had a similar idea to build a track near Pineville.

NASCAR

Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Great Britain, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately 0.25 to 2.66 miles (0.4 to 4.3 kilometers). NASCAR is the world's largest governing body for stock car racing, and its Sprint Cup Series is the de facto premier series of stock car racing. Top level races are 200 to 600 miles (322 to 966 km) in length.

Average speeds in the top classes are usually 70–80% of comparable levels of open wheel racing at the same tracks. Some stock cars may reach speeds in excess of 200 mph (322 km/h) at tracks such as Daytona International Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway. These tracks have come to be known as "restrictor plate tracks", a name that is derived from the "restrictor plate" device that was designed to limit top speeds to approximately 192 mph (309 km/h) on such tracks.

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