Question:

Who is the little green one eyed monster in Monsters Inc?

Answer:

The little one eyed, green monster from the movie, 'Monsters Inc' is, Mike Wazowski and is played by Billy Crystal. Thanks.

More Info:

This is a list of characters from the Pixar media franchise Monsters, Inc. consisting of the 2001 film Monsters, Inc. and the 2013 film Monsters University.

Monsters, Inc. is a 2001 American computer-animated comedy film directed by Pete Docter, produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Co-directed by Lee Unkrich and David Silverman, the film centers around two monsters employed at the titular Monsters, Inc.: top scarer James P. "Sulley" Sullivan (John Goodman), and his one-eyed assistant and best friend, Mike Wazowski (Billy Crystal). Monsters, Inc. employees generate their city's power by targeting and scaring children, but they are themselves afraid that the children may contaminate them; when one child enters Monstropolis, Mike and Sulley must return her.

Docter began developing the film in 1996 and wrote the story with Jill Culton, Jeff Pidgeon, and Ralph Eggleston. Fellow Pixar director Andrew Stanton wrote the screenplay with screenwriter Daniel Gerson. The characters went through many incarnations over the film's five-year production process. The technical team and animators found new ways to render fur and cloth realistically for the film. Randy Newman, who composed the music for Pixar's three prior films, returned to compose its fourth.

Films

An extraterrestrial or alien is any extraterrestrial lifeform; a lifeform that did not originate on Earth. The word extraterrestrial means "outside Earth". The first published use of extraterrestrial as a noun occurred in 1956, during the Golden Age of Science Fiction.

William Edward "Billy" Crystal (born March 14, 1948) is an American actor, voice actor, writer, film producer, comedian, television host, and film director. He gained prominence in the 1970s for playing Jodie Dallas on the ABC sitcom Soap and became a Hollywood film star during the late 1980s and 1990s, appearing in the critical and box office successes When Harry Met Sally... (1989), City Slickers (1991), and Analyze This (1999) and providing the voice of Mike in the Monsters, Inc. franchise. He has hosted the Academy Awards nine times from 1990 through the 84th Academy Awards in 2012.

Culture Monster Literature Entertainment

Monsters, Inc. Laugh Floor is an attraction within the Magic Kingdom, a theme park at Walt Disney World Resort. It opened on April 2, 2007 within the park's Tomorrowland section, where it replaced the Circle-Vision attraction The Timekeeper.

The main theater is equipped with 400 seats and utilizes digital puppetry technology similar to Epcot's voice-directed Turtle Talk with Crush. Live actors perform voices behind a large digital screen, while computer-rendered monsters appear with the actors' voices.

Yūji Tanaka (田中 裕二 Tanaka Yūji?, born January 10, 1965 in Nakano, Tokyo, Japan) is a Japanese comedian. He is best known as half of the owarai duo Bakushō Mondai along with Hikari Ōta. He also played Mike in the Japanese dub of the Pixar movie Monsters, Inc. and Br'er Fox in the Japanese dub of the Disney movie Song of the South (special edition). Tanaka was diagnised with testicular cancer in 2010 but was successfully treated following surgery.


Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention. Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens. The process has been accelerated in modern times by an entertainment industry which records and sells entertainment products. Entertainment evolves and can be adapted to suit any scale, ranging from an individual who chooses a private entertainment from a now enormous array of pre-recorded products; to a banquet adapted for two; to any size or type of party, with appropriate music and dance; to performances intended for thousands; and even for a global audience.

The experience of being entertained has come to be strongly associated with amusement, so that one common understanding of the idea is fun and laughter, although many entertainments have a serious purpose. This may be the case in the various forms of ceremony, celebration, religious festival, or satire for example. Hence, there is the possibility that what appears as entertainment may also be a means of achieving insight or intellectual growth.

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

Monsters, Inc. is a 2001 American computer-animated comedy film directed by Pete Docter, produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Co-directed by Lee Unkrich and David Silverman, the film centers around two monsters employed at the titular Monsters, Inc.: top scarer James P. "Sulley" Sullivan (John Goodman), and his one-eyed assistant and best friend, Mike Wazowski (Billy Crystal). Monsters, Inc. employees generate their city's power by targeting and scaring children, but they are themselves afraid that the children may contaminate them; when one child enters Monstropolis, Mike and Sulley must return her.

Docter began developing the film in 1996 and wrote the story with Jill Culton, Jeff Pidgeon, and Ralph Eggleston. Fellow Pixar director Andrew Stanton wrote the screenplay with screenwriter Daniel Gerson. The characters went through many incarnations over the film's five-year production process. The technical team and animators found new ways to render fur and cloth realistically for the film. Randy Newman, who composed the music for Pixar's three prior films, returned to compose its fourth.

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