Question:

Who is the actor that played in the TV series Get Smart?

Answer:

Don Adams played Maxwell Smart on the hit TV Series Get Smart produced 1965-1970, and again in 1995. Thanks for AnswerPartying!

More Info:

Don Adams (April 13, 1923 – September 25, 2005) was an American actor, comedian and director. In his five decades on television, he was best known as Maxwell Smart (Agent 86) in the television situation comedy Get Smart (1965–1970, 1995), which he also sometimes directed and wrote. Adams won three consecutive Emmy Awards for his portrayal of Smart (1967–1969). He provided the voices for the animated series Tennessee Tuxedo and His Tales (1963–1966) and Inspector Gadget (1983–1986) as their title characters. He voiced Sid Pickles in all episodes of Spike & Mike (1993–1999), and two follow up films, Spike & Mike Movie and Spike and Mike: Got Hostaged.

actor

Get Smart is an American comedy television series that satirizes the secret agent genre. Created by Mel Brooks with Buck Henry, the show stars Don Adams (as Maxwell Smart, Agent 86), Barbara Feldon (as Agent 99), and Edward Platt (as Chief). Henry said they created the show by request of Daniel Melnick, who was a partner, along with Leonard Stern and David Susskind, of the show's production company, Talent Associates, to capitalize on "the two biggest things in the entertainment world today"—James Bond and Inspector Clouseau. Brooks said: "It's an insane combination of James Bond and Mel Brooks comedy." This is the only Mel Brooks production to feature a laugh track.

The success of the show (which ran from September 18, 1965, to May 15, 1970) eventually spawned the follow-up films The Nude Bomb (a theatrical release not directly based on the show) and Get Smart, Again! (a made-for-TV sequel to the series), as well as a 1995 revival series and a 2008 film remake. In 2010, TV Guide ranked Get Smart's opening title sequence at No. 2 on its list of TV's Top 10 Credits Sequences, as selected by readers.

Get Smart is an American comedy television series that satirizes the secret agent genre. Created by Mel Brooks with Buck Henry, the show stars Don Adams (as Maxwell Smart, Agent 86), Barbara Feldon (as Agent 99), and Edward Platt (as Chief). Henry said they created the show by request of Daniel Melnick, who was a partner, along with Leonard Stern and David Susskind, of the show's production company, Talent Associates, to capitalize on "the two biggest things in the entertainment world today"—James Bond and Inspector Clouseau. Brooks said: "It's an insane combination of James Bond and Mel Brooks comedy." This is the only Mel Brooks production to feature a laugh track.

The success of the show (which ran from September 18, 1965, to May 15, 1970) eventually spawned the follow-up films The Nude Bomb (a theatrical release not directly based on the show) and Get Smart, Again! (a made-for-TV sequel to the series), as well as a 1995 revival series and a 2008 film remake. In 2010, TV Guide ranked Get Smart's opening title sequence at No. 2 on its list of TV's Top 10 Credits Sequences, as selected by readers.

Get Smart is an American comedy television series that satirizes the secret agent genre. Created by Mel Brooks with Buck Henry, the show stars Don Adams (as Maxwell Smart, Agent 86), Barbara Feldon (as Agent 99), and Edward Platt (as Chief). Henry said they created the show by request of Daniel Melnick, who was a partner, along with Leonard Stern and David Susskind, of the show's production company, Talent Associates, to capitalize on "the two biggest things in the entertainment world today"—James Bond and Inspector Clouseau. Brooks said: "It's an insane combination of James Bond and Mel Brooks comedy." This is the only Mel Brooks production to feature a laugh track.

The success of the show (which ran from September 18, 1965, to May 15, 1970) eventually spawned the follow-up films The Nude Bomb (a theatrical release not directly based on the show) and Get Smart, Again! (a made-for-TV sequel to the series), as well as a 1995 revival series and a 2008 film remake. In 2010, TV Guide ranked Get Smart's opening title sequence at No. 2 on its list of TV's Top 10 Credits Sequences, as selected by readers.

The United States Marine Corps (USMC) is a branch of the United States Armed Forces responsible for providing power projection from the sea, using the mobility of the United States Navy to rapidly deliver combined-arms task forces. It is one of seven uniformed services of the United States. Created in 1775, the Marine Corps has been a component of the United States Department of the Navy since 1834, often working closely with naval forces for training, transportation, and logistics.

Captain Samuel Nicholas formed two battalions of Continental Marines on 10 November 1775, in Philadelphia as naval infantry. Since then, the mission of the Marine Corps has evolved with changing military doctrine and American foreign policy. The Marine Corps has served in every American armed conflict and attained prominence in the 20th century when its theories and practices of amphibious warfare proved prescient and ultimately formed the cornerstone of the Pacific campaign of World War II. By the mid-20th century, the Marine Corps had become a major theorist and practitioner of amphibious warfare. Its ability to rapidly respond on short notice to expeditionary crises gives it a strong role in the implementation and execution of American foreign policy.

Don Adams (April 13, 1923 – September 25, 2005) was an American actor, comedian and director. In his five decades on television, he was best known as Maxwell Smart (Agent 86) in the television situation comedy Get Smart (1965–1970, 1995), which he also sometimes directed and wrote. Adams won three consecutive Emmy Awards for his portrayal of Smart (1967–1969). He provided the voices for the animated series Tennessee Tuxedo and His Tales (1963–1966) and Inspector Gadget (1983–1986) as their title characters. He voiced Sid Pickles in all episodes of Spike & Mike (1993–1999), and two follow up films, Spike & Mike Movie and Spike and Mike: Got Hostaged.

Get Smart, Again! is a made-for-TV movie based on the 1965-1970 NBC/CBS television series, Get Smart!, which originally aired February 26, 1989 on ABC (the network that rejected the original pilot for the Get Smart! TV series). It has subsequently been released twice on DVD by different publishers. In the video release of the movie, the laugh track is absent.

The film is not as well known as the earlier theatrical release, 1980's The Nude Bomb, but was better received by fans of the original program. The Nude Bomb featured only four characters from the original TV show: Smart, Larrabee (played by Don Adams' cousin, Robert Karvelas), The Chief (with Dana Elcar replacing deceased Edward Platt) and Agent 13 (Joey Forman, replacing Dave Ketchum; Forman had played Harry Hoo in the series); meanwhile, Get Smart, Again! featured all of the surviving original cast reprising their roles. The tone and feel of Get Smart, Again! were also closer to that of the 1960s TV series, especially as it was written and produced by Leonard Stern, co-producer of the original Get Smart. It also ignored completely the continuity established in The Nude Bomb, such as the renaming of CONTROL as PITS (Provisional Intelligence Tactical Service). (Although as CONTROL is said to have disbanded in the 1970s, it's not impossible for both CONTROL and PITS to co-exist in the Get Smart universe.) The twins (boy and girl) that 99 gave birth to in the late 60s were ignored in the film, but mentioned briefly in the TV-movie.

The Nude Bomb (also known as The Return of Maxwell Smart or Maxwell Smart and the Nude Bomb) is a 1980 comedy film based on the television series Get Smart. It starred Don Adams as Maxwell Smart, Agent 86, and was directed by Clive Donner. It was retitled The Return of Maxwell Smart for television so as to avoid any trouble with the censors.

In the film, Smart is called back into service in order to stop a nefarious KAOS terrorist plan from exploding a bomb that destroys only clothing, so as to leave KAOS as the only supplier of clothes to the entire world. Saint-Sauvage, the KAOS fashion designer, finds everyone else's clothing designs gauche, so he builds a clone machine capable of cloning his favorite seamstress and implements the Nude Bombs. He wears a costume including thimbles over each finger, and his mountain lair is entered via a large zipper.

Film

Television is one of the major mass media of the United States. Household ownership is 96.7% and the majority of households have more than one. Its peak was the 1996-1997 season with 98.4% ownership. [1] As a whole, the television networks of the United States are the largest and most syndicated in the world.

As of August 2013, there are approximately 114,200,000 American households with television.

Television Entertainment Culture

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

Entertainment Culture
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
9