Question:

Who is denver broncos kick returner?

Answer:

Born in Florida, Bronco's Travis Shelton was born fast. He is the cousin of the infamous Devin Hester, who holds several NFL records for kick returning.

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NFL
National Football League

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league composed of 32 teams divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The highest level of professional football in the world, the NFL runs a 17-week regular season from the week after Labor Day to the week after Christmas, with each team playing sixteen games and having one bye week. Out of the league's 32 teams, six (four division winners and two wild-card teams) from each conference compete in the NFL playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, played between the champions of the NFC and AFC. The champions of the Super Bowl are awarded the Vince Lombardi Trophy; various other awards exist to recognize individual players and coaches. Most games are played on Sunday afternoons; some games are also played on Mondays and Thursdays during the regular season. There are games on Saturdays during the last few weeks of the regular season and the first two playoff weekends.

The NFL was formed on August 20, 1920, as the American Professional Football Conference; the league changed its name to the American Professional Football Association (APFA) on September 17, 1920, and changed its name to the National Football League on June 24, 1922, after spending the 1920 and 1921 seasons as the APFA. In 1966, the NFL agreed to merge with the rival American Football League (AFL), effective 1970; the first Super Bowl was held at the end of that same season in January 1967. Today, the NFL has the highest average attendance (67,591) of any professional sports league in the world and is the most popular sports league in the United States. The Super Bowl is among the biggest club sporting events in the world and individual Super Bowl games account for many of the most-watched programs in American history. At the corporate level, the NFL is an nonprofit 501(c)(6) association. The NFL's executive officer is the commissioner, who has broad authority in governing the league.


Devin Hester

Devin Hester (born November 4, 1982) is an American football return specialist for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Miami, where he was the first player in the university’s recent history to play in all three phases of American football (offense, defense, special teams).

Hester was drafted in the second round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He quickly made an impact as a kick returner, and later became one of the team's starting wide receivers. Hester holds the NFL record for most all-time return touchdowns (punt and kick combined) and most all-time punt return touchdowns.

Travis Shelton (born April 23, 1985) is an American football wide receiver who is currently a free agent. He was signed by the Denver Broncos as an undrafted free agent in 2009. Shelton also played for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in 2010. He played college football at Temple.

NFL Florida
American football positions

In American football, each team has eleven players on the field at one time. The specific role that a player takes on the field is called their position. Under the modern rules of American football, teams are allowed unlimited substitutions, that is teams may change any number of players after any play. This has resulted in the development of three "platoons" of players, the offense (the team with the ball, who is trying to score), the defense (the team trying to prevent the other team from scoring, and to take the ball from them), and the special teams (who play in kicking situations). Within those platoons, various specific positions exist depending on what the player's main job is.

In American football, the offense is the side which is in possession of the ball. It is their job to advance the ball towards the opponent's end zone to score points. Broadly speaking, the eleven players of the offense are broken into two groups: the five offensive linemen, whose primary job is to block, and the six backs and receivers whose primary job is advance the ball by means of either running with the ball or passing it. The backs and receivers are also commonly known as skill position players or as eligible ball carriers (offensive linemen are not normally eligible to advance the ball during each play).

Travis Shelton (born April 23, 1985) is an American football wide receiver who is currently a free agent. He was signed by the Denver Broncos as an undrafted free agent in 2009. Shelton also played for the Winnipeg Blue Bombers in 2010. He played college football at Temple.


Devin Hester

Devin Hester (born November 4, 1982) is an American football return specialist for the Chicago Bears of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football for the University of Miami, where he was the first player in the university’s recent history to play in all three phases of American football (offense, defense, special teams).

Hester was drafted in the second round of the 2006 NFL Draft. He quickly made an impact as a kick returner, and later became one of the team's starting wide receivers. Hester holds the NFL record for most all-time return touchdowns (punt and kick combined) and most all-time punt return touchdowns.

In American and Canadian football, a kick returner (KR) is the player on special teams who is primarily responsible to catch kickoffs and attempts to return them in the opposite direction. If the ball is kicked into his own endzone, he must assess the situation on the field while the ball is in the air and determine if it would be beneficial to his team for a return. If he decides that it is not, he can make a touchback by kneeling down in the end zone after catching the ball, which gives his team the ball at their own 20-yard line to start the drive.

He is usually one of the faster players on the team, often a wide receiver, defensive back, or running back. While starters on offense or defense sometimes assume this role, it is usually given to backup in order to prevent them from spending more time on the field and taking extra hits.

Todd Scott Sauerbrun (/ˈsaʊərbrən/; born January 4, 1973) is a former American college and professional football player who was a punter in the National Football League (NFL) for thirteen seasons. He played college football for West Virginia University, and was recognized as an All-American. He was originally drafted by the Chicago Bears in the second round of the 1995 NFL Draft, and also played for the Kansas City Chiefs, Carolina Panthers, Denver Broncos and New England Patriots of the NFL, and the Florida Tuskers of the United Football League (UFL).


Return specialist

A Return Specialist is a player on American football or Canadian football special teams who specializes in returning punts and kickoff returns. There are few players who are exclusively return specialists; most play other positions as well. The special teams counterpart of a return specialist is a kicking specialist.

According to 2012 College Football All-America Team selection Venric Mark: "Returning punts is harder," Mark said. "You have to judge the ball more, you have to know when to fair catch and when not to. You can't be a superhero and try to catch everything. With kick returns, you catch the ball and — boom — you're going."


Human Interest

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.


National Football League

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league composed of 32 teams divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The highest level of professional football in the world, the NFL runs a 17-week regular season from the week after Labor Day to the week after Christmas, with each team playing sixteen games and having one bye week. Out of the league's 32 teams, six (four division winners and two wild-card teams) from each conference compete in the NFL playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, played between the champions of the NFC and AFC. The champions of the Super Bowl are awarded the Vince Lombardi Trophy; various other awards exist to recognize individual players and coaches. Most games are played on Sunday afternoons; some games are also played on Mondays and Thursdays during the regular season. There are games on Saturdays during the last few weeks of the regular season and the first two playoff weekends.

The NFL was formed on August 20, 1920, as the American Professional Football Conference; the league changed its name to the American Professional Football Association (APFA) on September 17, 1920, and changed its name to the National Football League on June 24, 1922, after spending the 1920 and 1921 seasons as the APFA. In 1966, the NFL agreed to merge with the rival American Football League (AFL), effective 1970; the first Super Bowl was held at the end of that same season in January 1967. Today, the NFL has the highest average attendance (67,591) of any professional sports league in the world and is the most popular sports league in the United States. The Super Bowl is among the biggest club sporting events in the world and individual Super Bowl games account for many of the most-watched programs in American history. At the corporate level, the NFL is an nonprofit 501(c)(6) association. The NFL's executive officer is the commissioner, who has broad authority in governing the league.

Football
American football

American football (known as football in the United States and gridiron in some other countries) is a sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field 120 yards long by 53.33 yards wide with goalposts at each end. The offense attempts to advance an oval ball (the football) down the field by running with or passing it. They must advance it at least ten yards in four downs to receive a new set of four downs and continue the drive; if not, they turn over the football to the opposing team. Points are scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown, kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal or by the defense tackling the ball carrier in the offense's end zone for a safety. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

American football evolved in the United States, originating from the sport of rugby football. The first game of American football was played on November 6, 1869 between two college teams, Rutgers and Princeton, under rules resembling rugby and soccer. A set of rule changes drawn up from 1880 onward by Walter Camp, the "Father of American Football", established the snap, eleven-player teams and the concept of downs, and later rule changes legalized the forward pass, created the neutral zone and specified the size and shape of the football.

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