Question:

Who are the top 10 finishers in the Sprint Cup race yesterday at Atlanta?

Answer:

The top ten racers from the 2010 Emory Healthcare 500 were Tony Stewart, Denny Hamlin, Carl Edwards, Kasey Kahne, Martin Truex Jr, Jimmie Johnson, Greg Biffle, Paul Menard, Devin Harvick, and AJ Allmendinger.

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Devin Harvick Atlanta

2002 Busch Series Champion
2000 Craftsman Truck Series Champion

2001 Busch Series Rookie of the Year
1998 Craftsman Truck Series Rookie of the Year

Jimmie Kenneth Johnson (born September 17, 1975) is an American NASCAR race car driver. He currently drives the No. 48 Lowe's Chevrolet SS for Hendrick Motorsports in the Sprint Cup Series.

Johnson was born in El Cajon, California, and began racing motorcycles at the age of four. After graduating from Granite Hills High School he competed in off-road series. He raced in Mickey Thompson Entertainment Group (MTEG), Short-course Off-road Drivers Association (SODA) and SCORE International, winning rookie of the year in each series. In 1998, Johnson and his team began stock car racing. He moved to the national American Speed Association (ASA) series for late model touring cars, and won another rookie of the year title. In 2000, he switched to the NASCAR Busch Series (now Nationwide Series).

Carl Michael Edwards II (born August 15, 1979) is a NASCAR driver. He currently drives the No. 99 Ford Fusion in the Sprint Cup Series for Roush Fenway Racing. He won the 2007 NASCAR Busch Series championship and nearly won the 2011 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series title, but lost by a tiebreaker to Tony Stewart. Edwards is known for stopping his car at the finish line and doing a back flip off of it after winning a race.

Kasey Kenneth Kahne (/ˈkn/; born April 10, 1980) is a NASCAR driver. He drives the No. 5 Farmers Insurance Group/Quaker State Chevrolet SS for Hendrick Motorsports in the Sprint Cup Series.

Off the track, Kahne is active in charitable work and is a member of the President's Council on Service and Civic Participation. He also owns his own race team, Kasey Kahne Racing, that competes in the World of Outlaws series, fielding two cars, one for Daryn Pittman, and the other for Cody Darrah. His team also fields a car in the USAC Sprint Car Series for Brady Bacon, and in USAC midgets for Brad Sweet. Kahne is a two-time Skagit Speedway winner of the Annual Jim Raper memorial Dirt Cup (2002 and 2003), and holds the current record for the fastest lap at Skagit.

2011, 2005, 2002 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Champion
1997 Indy Racing League Champion
1995 USAC Triple Crown Champion
1994 USAC National Midget Series Champion
2006 IROC champion
2005, 2007 Brickyard 400 Winner
2009 Sprint All-Star Race winner
2001, 2002, 2007 Budweiser Shootout Winner

1999 Winston Cup Series Rookie of the Year
1996 Indianapolis 500 Rookie of the Year

the Sprint Cup Sprint

2006 Budweiser Shootout Winner

James Dennis Alan "Denny" Hamlin, Jr. (born November 18, 1980) is an American NASCAR race car driver. He currently drives the No. 11 FedEx Toyota for Joe Gibbs Racing in the Sprint Cup Series.

Martin Lee Truex Jr. (born June 29, 1980) is an American stock car racing driver. He drives the No. 56 Toyota Camry for Michael Waltrip Racing in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. Truex is a two-time Nationwide Series champion; having won the title in 2004 and 2005. His younger brother, Ryan is a champion in the K&N Pro Series East division, while his cousin Curtis raced for JR Motorsports.

Paul Menard (born August 21, 1980) is a NASCAR driver. He currently drives the No. 27 Menard's/NIBCO Chevrolet in the Sprint Cup Series for Richard Childress Racing. He is the son of Menards founder John Menard, Jr., whose company is his sponsor. Menard was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, and he attended the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire.

The Chase for the Sprint Cup, originally known as "The Chase for the Championship" during its creation, and then "The Chase for the Nextel Cup" (from 2004 to 2007) is the championship system used in NASCAR's top division, the Sprint Cup Series, akin to the postseason in American professional sports leagues. The Chase was announced on January 21, 2004, and first used during the 2004 Nextel Cup season. The format used from 2004 to 2006 was modified slightly starting with the 2007 season. Beginning with the 2008 Sprint Cup Series, the Chase became known by its new name as a result of the merger of Nextel Communications with Sprint Corporation. A major change to the qualifying criteria was instituted in 2011, along with a major change to the points system. As of 2011, the 10-race Chase pits the 10 drivers with the highest "regular season" points, plus the two drivers ranked between 11th and 20th in regular season points who have the most race wins, against each other, while racing in the standard field of 43 cars. The driver with the most points after the final 10 races is declared the champion.

The current version of the Chase was announced by NASCAR chairman and CEO Brian France on January 26, 2011. The current format marks a major change from the previous format announced January 22, 2007, which in turn modified the original Chase format announced on January 21, 2004. The 2011 change marks the 13th time since 1949 that the point system has been changed.

The Chase for the Sprint Cup, originally known as "The Chase for the Championship" during its creation, and then "The Chase for the Nextel Cup" (from 2004 to 2007) is the championship system used in NASCAR's top division, the Sprint Cup Series, akin to the postseason in American professional sports leagues. The Chase was announced on January 21, 2004, and first used during the 2004 Nextel Cup season. The format used from 2004 to 2006 was modified slightly starting with the 2007 season. Beginning with the 2008 Sprint Cup Series, the Chase became known by its new name as a result of the merger of Nextel Communications with Sprint Corporation. A major change to the qualifying criteria was instituted in 2011, along with a major change to the points system. As of 2011, the 10-race Chase pits the 10 drivers with the highest "regular season" points, plus the two drivers ranked between 11th and 20th in regular season points who have the most race wins, against each other, while racing in the standard field of 43 cars. The driver with the most points after the final 10 races is declared the champion.

The current version of the Chase was announced by NASCAR chairman and CEO Brian France on January 26, 2011. The current format marks a major change from the previous format announced January 22, 2007, which in turn modified the original Chase format announced on January 21, 2004. The 2011 change marks the 13th time since 1949 that the point system has been changed.

NASCAR

Stock car racing is a form of automobile racing found mainly in the United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia, Great Britain, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina. Traditionally, races are run on oval tracks measuring approximately 0.25 to 2.66 miles (0.4 to 4.3 kilometers). NASCAR is the world's largest governing body for stock car racing, and its Sprint Cup Series is the de facto premier series of stock car racing. Top level races are 200 to 600 miles (322 to 966 km) in length.

Average speeds in the top classes are usually 70–80% of comparable levels of open wheel racing at the same tracks. Some stock cars may reach speeds in excess of 200 mph (322 km/h) at tracks such as Daytona International Speedway and Talladega Superspeedway. These tracks have come to be known as "restrictor plate tracks", a name that is derived from the "restrictor plate" device that was designed to limit top speeds to approximately 192 mph (309 km/h) on such tracks.

Dixie 400 (1961-1966)

Dixie 500 (1967-1979)

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