Question:

Which stadium is older Wrigley field or Fenway park and when did they open?

Answer:

Fenway Park is the oldest stadium in baseball. It was opened on April 20, 1912, while Wrigley opened on April 23, 1914. AnswerParty!

More Info:

Which stadium
Fenway park

Boston Red Sox (MLB) (1912–present)
Boston Braves (MLB) (1914–1915)
Boston Bulldogs (AFL) (1926)
Boston Redskins (NFL) (1933–1936)
Boston Shamrocks (AFL) (1936–1937)
Boston Yanks (NFL) (1944–1948)
Boston Patriots (AFL) (1963–1968)
Boston Beacons (NASL) (1968)

Fenway Park is a baseball park near Kenmore Square in Boston, Massachusetts. Located at 4 Yawkey Way, it has served as the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox baseball team since it opened in 1912 and is the oldest Major League Baseball stadium in use.


Wrigley field

Wrigley Field /ˈrɪɡli/ is a baseball venue located in Chicago, Illinois, United States that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. It was built in 1914 as Weeghman Park for the Chicago Federal League baseball team, the Chicago Whales. It was called Cubs Park between 1920 and 1926 before being renamed for then Cubs team owner and chewing gum magnate, William Wrigley, Jr.. Between 1921 and 1970, it was also the home of the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. It hosted the second annual National Hockey League Winter Classic on January 1, 2009.

Located in the community area of Lakeview, Wrigley Field sits on an irregular block bounded by Clark (west) and Addison (south) Streets and Waveland (north) and Sheffield (east) Avenues. The area surrounding the ballpark contains residential streets, in addition to bars, restaurants and other establishments and is called Wrigleyville. The ballpark's mailing address is 1060 W. Addison Street.


Wrigley Company

The William Wrigley Jr. Company is a company headquartered in the GIC (Global Innovation Center) in Goose Island, Chicago, Illinois. The company was founded on April 1, 1891, originally selling products such as soap and baking powder. In 1892, William Wrigley, Jr., the company's founder, began packaging chewing gum with each can of baking powder. The chewing gum eventually became more popular than the baking powder itself and Wrigley's reoriented the company to produce the popular chewing gum.

The company currently sells its products in more than 180 countries and districts and maintains 140 factories in various countries and districts, including the United States, Mexico, Australia, the United Kingdom, Canada, Spain, New Zealand, the Philippines, Czech Republic, Germany, South Africa, Argentina, Tanzania, Tunisia, Somalia, North Korea (the only US enterprise there]citation needed[) France, Kenya, China (including Taiwan), India, Poland, and Russia.

         

The DePaul Blue Demons are the intercollegiate athletic teams of DePaul University, located in Chicago, in the U.S. state of Illinois. The Blue Demons participate in NCAA Division I and are a member of the Big East Conference. They were not affiliated with any circuit until it helped establish the Great Midwest Conference in 1991. It subsequently became a charter member of Conference USA from 1995 until its move to the Big East. On December 15, 2012, DePaul and the other seven Catholic, non-FBS schools announced that they were departing the Big East for a new conference.


Wrigley Field

Wrigley Field /ˈrɪɡli/ is a baseball venue located in Chicago, Illinois, United States that has served as the home ballpark of the Chicago Cubs since 1916. It was built in 1914 as Weeghman Park for the Chicago Federal League baseball team, the Chicago Whales. It was called Cubs Park between 1920 and 1926 before being renamed for then Cubs team owner and chewing gum magnate, William Wrigley, Jr.. Between 1921 and 1970, it was also the home of the Chicago Bears of the National Football League. It hosted the second annual National Hockey League Winter Classic on January 1, 2009.

Located in the community area of Lakeview, Wrigley Field sits on an irregular block bounded by Clark (west) and Addison (south) Streets and Waveland (north) and Sheffield (east) Avenues. The area surrounding the ballpark contains residential streets, in addition to bars, restaurants and other establishments and is called Wrigleyville. The ballpark's mailing address is 1060 W. Addison Street.


Fenway Park

Boston Red Sox (MLB) (1912–present)
Boston Braves (MLB) (1914–1915)
Boston Bulldogs (AFL) (1926)
Boston Redskins (NFL) (1933–1936)
Boston Shamrocks (AFL) (1936–1937)
Boston Yanks (NFL) (1944–1948)
Boston Patriots (AFL) (1963–1968)
Boston Beacons (NASL) (1968)

Fenway Park is a baseball park near Kenmore Square in Boston, Massachusetts. Located at 4 Yawkey Way, it has served as the home ballpark of the Boston Red Sox baseball team since it opened in 1912 and is the oldest Major League Baseball stadium in use.

Fenway Wrigley Dugout Boston Red Sox season
Major League Baseball

Major League Baseball (MLB) is a North American professional baseball league consisting of teams that play in the American League and National League. The two leagues, dating to 1901 and 1876 respectively as separate legal entities, merged in 2000 into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball.

MLB constitutes one of the four major professional sports leagues of North America. It is composed of thirty teams: twenty-nine in the United States and one in Canada. Teams in MLB play 162 games each season over six months (April through September). Five teams in each league advance to a four-round postseason tournament that culminates in the World Series, a best-of-seven-games championship series between the two league champions that dates to 1903.


Sports in the United States

Sports are an important part of the culture of the United States. Four of the nation's five most popular team sports were developed in North America: American football, basketball, baseball and ice hockey, whereas soccer was developed in England. The four Major leagues in the United States are the National Basketball Association (NBA), National Football League (NFL), Major League Baseball (MLB), the National Hockey League (NHL); all enjoy massive media exposure and are considered the preeminent competitions in their respective sports in the world. Three of those leagues have teams that represent Canadian cities, and all four are among the most lucrative sports leagues in the world. The top professional soccer league in the United States, Major League Soccer, has not yet reached the popularity levels of the top four sports leagues, although average attendance has been increasing and in fact has matched or surpassed those of the NBA and the NHL.

Professional teams in all major sports operate as franchises within a league. All major sports leagues use the same type of schedule with a playoff tournament after the regular season ends. In addition to the major league-level organizations, several sports also have professional minor leagues, active in smaller cities across the country.


American football in the United States

There is no single national governing body for American football in the United States or a continental governing body for North America. There is an international governing body, the International Federation of American Football, or IFAF, but it does not have much influence in American football in the United States. American football is the most popular sport in the United States, but does not get as much recognition around the world.

Befitting its status as a popular sport, football is played in leagues of different size, age and quality, in all regions of the country. Organized football is played almost exclusively by men and boys, although a few amateur and semi-professional women's leagues have begun play in recent years. A team / academy may be referred to as a 'football program' - not to be confused with football program.

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