Question:

Which animal has the longest gestation period?

Answer:

The longest gestation period for a mammal is that of the African elephant with an average of 660 days, and a maximum of 760 days.

More Info:

Biology

Gestation is the carrying of an embryo or fetus inside female viviparous animals, including mammals, as well as some non-mammalian species. Mammals during pregnancy can have one or more gestations at the same time (multiple gestations).

The time interval of a gestation is called the gestation period. In human obstetrics, gestational age refers to the embryonic or fetal age plus two weeks. This is approximately the duration since the woman's last menstrual period (LMP) began.

Reproduction Elephant

Rhynchocyon
Petrodromus
Macroscelides
Elephantulus

Elephant shrews, or jumping shrews, are small insectivorous mammals native to Africa, belonging to the family Macroscelididae, in the order Macroscelidea, whose traditional common English name comes from a fancied resemblance between their long noses and the trunk of an elephant, and an assumed relationship with the shrews (family Soricidae) in the order Insectivora. It has become plain that the elephant shrews are not to be classified with the superficially similar true shrews, but ironically are rather more closely related to elephants and their kin within the newly recognized Afrotheria; the biologist Jonathan Kingdon has proposed they instead be called sengis, a term derived from the Bantu languages of Africa.

The Jamaican coney (Geocapromys brownii), also known as the Jamaican hutia, is a terrestrial land mammal found in the rocky, forested areas of Jamaica. It is endemic to the Island.

It is related to the hutias and more distantly to guinea pigs. It is the only extant native land mammal on Jamaica besides bats.

Row 1: common vampire bat, Virginia opossum, eastern grey kangaroo.
Row 2: southern marsupial mole, humans, northern elephant seals.
Row 3: fox squirrel, tree pangolin, African elephants.
Row 4: platypus, Philippine flying lemur, reindeer.
Row 5: humpback whale, star-nosed mole, giant panda.
Row 6: giant armadillo, plains zebras, black and rufous elephant shrew.

Mammals (class Mammalia /məˈmli.ə/) are a clade of endothermic amniotes. Among the features that distinguish them from the other amniotes, the reptiles and the birds, are hair, three middle ear bones, mammary glands in females, and a neocortex (a region of the brain). The mammalian brain regulates body temperature and the circulatory system, including the four-chambered heart. The mammals include the largest animals on the planet, the rorqual whales, as well as some of the most intelligent, such as elephants, some primates and some cetaceans. The basic body type is a four-legged land-borne animal, but some mammals are adapted for life at sea, in the air, in the trees, or on two legs. The largest group of mammals, the placentals, have a placenta which feeds the offspring during pregnancy. Mammals range in size from the 30–40 mm (1.2–1.6 in) bumblebee bat to the 33-meter (108 ft) blue whale.

Zoology

Fauna of Africa, in its broader sense, is all the animals living on the African continent and its surrounding seas and islands. The more characteristic African fauna is found in the Afrotropical ecoregion - formerly called Ethiopian (the Sub-Saharan Africa). Lying almost entirely within the tropics, and equally to north and south of the equator creates favourable conditions for rich wildlife.

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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