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Where was the blowjob invented?

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I am unsure who was the first person to perform a blow job. Can AnswerParty answer anything else for you? Tahnks!

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About this sound Tisha B'Av  (lit. "the ninth of Av") (Hebrew: תשעה באב‎ or ט׳ באב), is an annual fast day in Judaism which commemorates the destruction of the First and Second Temples in Jerusalem and the subsequent exile of the Jews from the Land of Israel. The day also commemorates other tragedies which occurred on the same day, including the Roman massacre of over 100,000 Jews at Betar in 132 CE. Instituted by the rabbis of 2nd-century Palestine, Tisha B'Av is regarded as the saddest day in the Jewish calendar and a day which is destined for tragedy.

In addition to the basic five prohibitions, all pleasurable activity is forbidden. The Book of Lamentations which mourns the destruction of Jerusalem is read in the synagogue, followed by the kinnot, a series of liturgical dirges which lament the loss of the Temple and Jerusalem. As the day has become associated with remembrance of other major calamities which have befallen the Jewish people, some kinnot recall events such as the murder of the Ten Martyrs, the decimation of numerous medieval Jewish communities during the Crusades and the destruction of European Jewry in the Holocaust.

Bible

The Book of Job (/ˈb/; Hebrew: אִיוֹב Iyob), commonly referred to simply as Job, is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. It relates the story of Job, his trials at the hands of a character referred to as "the satan", in Hebrew, or in English, "the accuser", his discussions with friends on the origins and nature of his suffering, his challenge to God, and finally a response from God. The book is a didactic poem set in a prose frame. An oft-asked question in the book of Job is, "Why do the righteous suffer?". However, Maimonides suggests that the person of Elihu saw Job as a shallow, "unexamining" and "unwise", perhaps even foolish, man who was merely grateful on a superficial level for what he had, thereby creating an opening for trouble to enter into his life.

The book of Job has been included in lists of the greatest books in world literature.

Job

Ketuvim]pronunciation?[ or Kəṯûḇîm (in Biblical Hebrew: כְּתוּבִים "writings") is the third and final section of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), after Torah (instruction) and Nevi'im (prophets). In English translations of the Hebrew Bible, this section is usually entitled "Writings" or "Hagiographa".

The Ketuvim are believed to have been written under the Ruach HaKodesh, but with one level less authority than that of prophecy.

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