Question:

Where is the flasher located on a 2000 Ford Ranger?

Answer:

The flasher is located right under your steering column. The part slides off a rail system and its a square blue relay switch with 6 prongs in it. You will need a Flathead screwdriver to carefully separate the piece to pull the relay switch out.

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Ford Ranger

The Ford Ranger is a nameplate that has been used on two distinct model lines of pickup trucks sold by the Ford Motor Company, a version sold in North America and later parts of South America, as well as a separate model sold internationally.

Ford designed and engineered the North American version of the Ranger, which commenced manufacture in January 1982 for the 1983 model year and ended production in December 2011. For the 1995 model year, Ford exported the North American model to select Latin and South American countries; however, as demand increased, Ford began producing the model at its Argentinian plant. During the 1994 through 2010 model years, Mazda badge engineered this model as the North American "B-Series" replacing the "international" version of the Mazda B-Series that had previously been retailed in North America. During its 29-year production run, the Ranger received several updates: notably, the 1989 model year facelift, the introduction of the second-generation model for 1993, a 1998 model year facelift of the same, and several smaller second-generation cosmetic changes in the 2001, 2004, and 2006 model years. The Latin and South American version was re-skinned in 2009 for the 2010 model year, receiving all-new exterior sheet metal while retaining the existing body structure.

Ford
Pickup trucks

A pickup truck, often simply referred to as a pickup or pick-up, is a light motor vehicle with an open-top, rear cargo area (bed).

In North America, the term pickup is used for light trucks with a lighter duty chassis and factory built, integrated bed, as well as for coupé utility vehicles, often based on a personal car chassis, but also often on a special dedicated chassis for such use.


Power engineering

Power engineering, also called Power Systems engineering, is a subfield of electrical engineering that deals with the generation, transmission, distribution and utilization of electric power as well as the electrical devices connected to such systems including generators, motors and transformers. Although much of the field is concerned with the problems of three-phase AC power - the standard for large-scale power transmission and distribution across the modern world - a significant fraction of the field is concerned with the conversion between AC and DC power as well as the development of specialized power systems such as those used in aircraft or for electric railway networks. It was a subfield of electrical engineering before the emergence of energy engineering.

Electricity became a subject of scientific interest in the late 17th century with the work of William Gilbert. Over the next two centuries a number of important discoveries were made including the incandescent lightbulb and the voltaic pile. Probably the greatest discovery with respect to power engineering came from Michael Faraday who in 1831 discovered that a change in magnetic flux induces an electromotive force in a loop of wire—a principle known as electromagnetic induction that helps explain how generators and transformers work.

Relay Transducers
Railroad switch

A railroad switch, turnout or [set of] points is a mechanical installation enabling railway trains to be guided from one track to another, such as at a railway junction or where a spur or siding branches off.

The switch consists of the pair of linked tapering rails, known as points (switch rails or point blades), lying between the diverging outer rails (the stock rails). These points can be moved laterally into one of two positions to direct a train coming from the narrow end toward the straight path or the diverging path. A train moving from the narrow end toward the point blades (i.e. it will be directed to one of the two paths depending on the position of the points) is said to be executing a facing-point movement.

Steering Switch Screwdriver
Ford Ranger

The Ford Ranger is a nameplate that has been used on two distinct model lines of pickup trucks sold by the Ford Motor Company, a version sold in North America and later parts of South America, as well as a separate model sold internationally.

Ford designed and engineered the North American version of the Ranger, which commenced manufacture in January 1982 for the 1983 model year and ended production in December 2011. For the 1995 model year, Ford exported the North American model to select Latin and South American countries; however, as demand increased, Ford began producing the model at its Argentinian plant. During the 1994 through 2010 model years, Mazda badge engineered this model as the North American "B-Series" replacing the "international" version of the Mazda B-Series that had previously been retailed in North America. During its 29-year production run, the Ranger received several updates: notably, the 1989 model year facelift, the introduction of the second-generation model for 1993, a 1998 model year facelift of the same, and several smaller second-generation cosmetic changes in the 2001, 2004, and 2006 model years. The Latin and South American version was re-skinned in 2009 for the 2010 model year, receiving all-new exterior sheet metal while retaining the existing body structure.

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