Question:

Where is DJ Pauly D going to be next weekend?

Answer:

Forever Fridays w/ DJ Pauly D by Beta at Beta Night Club Friday, 17 September 2010 is the earliest event Pauly has scheduled.

More Info:

St. Pauli (Sankt Pauli; German pronunciation: ), located in the Hamburg-Mitte borough, is one of the 105 quarters of the city of Hamburg, Germany. Situated on the right bank of the Elbe river, the Landungsbrücken are a northern part of the port of Hamburg. St. Pauli contains a world famous red light district around the street Reeperbahn. In 2006 the population was 27,612. At the beginning of the 17th century it developed as a suburb called 'Hamburger Berg' (Hamburg mountain) outside the gates of the nearby city of Hamburg and close to the city of Altona. The name comes from a hill in that area that was planed by Hamburg in 1620 for defence reasons (free field of fire for the artillery). Therefore, settlement was initially allowed there, but soon businesses, which were not desired inside Hamburg, e.g. for their smell or noise, were relegated to 'Hamburger Berg'. Also the rope makers (or 'Reeper' in Low German) went here because in the city it was hard to find enough space for their work. The name of St. Pauli's most famous street Reeperbahn, or "Rope Walk," harkens back to its rope making past. When people were officially allowed to live in St. Pauli at the end of the 17th century the city government moved workhouses and (pestilence) hospitals out of the city to 'Hamburger Berg,' which later was named after its church, 'St. Pauli' (Saint Paul). There have been various social fights during the last decades (examples are Hafenstraße, Rote Flora and Bambule). It is situated directly on the north bank of the Elbe river close to the port of Hamburg. It is located south to Eimsbüttel, west of Hamburg-Neustadt and east of Altona. According to the statistical office of Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein, the quarter has total area of 2.6 km2 (1 sq mi). St. Pauli has 27,612 inhabitants in more than 17,000 households. Immigrants were 27.9% of the population. There were 11.9% with children under the age of 18 and 9.3% of the inhabitants were 65 years of age or older. 63.4% of all households were made up of individuals. The Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNI) is located in the Bernhard Nocht Straße 7. It is a research center for tropical and infectious diseases and provides an information center about health risks, vaccinations and medical data about other countries for tourism and travel advice. The former in the Bernhard Nocht Straße located hospital department is now in the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (UKE), Martinistraße 52. BNI website In 2006 there were two elementary schools and a secondary school in St. Pauli. A prominent symbol is its football club, FC St. Pauli and the Millerntor-Stadion. The club played host to the inaugural FIFI Wild Cup in May–June 2006.
In 2010 the FC St. Pauli was one hundred years old. To the jubilee the Fan club 18auf12 had recorded a song: One Hundred Beers (Words and music by Henning Knorr & Christoph Brüx). St. Pauli has a long tradition as a recreation and amusement centre. The big port of Hamburg led many sailors to Hamburg who preferably spent their spare time (as long as their ships were unloaded and loaded again) in this area. Since then there has been prostitution in St. Pauli, and it is still best known as Hamburg's red-light district. The red-light district is an area of a few streets around the street Reeperbahn often referred to as the Kiez. Bars and music clubs have a tradition in the Kiez St. Pauli. The Beatles lived in St. Pauli and played at the Star-Club before becoming famous. Singer and actor Hans Albers is strongly associated with St. Pauli, providing the neighbourhood's unofficial anthem, with "Auf der Reeperbahn Nachts um Halb Eins" ("On the Reeperbahn at half past midnight") from the movie Große Freiheit Nr. 7. The district is referenced in the song "St Pauli" by Art Brut, which also contains the lyrics "Punk rock ist nicht tot" ("punk rock is not dead"). The Swedish post-industrial rock band Sällskapet's song Nordlicht talks about a pub in the area. The song contains detailed instructions supposedly leading to the location of the pub. The Guardian counted St. Pauli to the five best places to live in the world. The Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency Bundesamt für Seeschiffahrt und Hydrographie (BSH) is located in Bernhard Nocht Str. 78. The BSH is a federal authority coming under the jurisdiction of the Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Affairs. Among other things, it provides information of all matters of maritime shipping, to special funding programmes, law of flag, certification of mariners and informations of the coasts and coastal waters of Germany. Official website BSH The rapid transit system services St. Pauli with the city train stations Landungsbrücken and Reeperbahn and the underground railway stations Landungsbrücken, St. Pauli and Feldstrasse. Public transport is also provided by buses and ferries to the other bank of the Elbe river. As of 2006, according to the Department of Motor Vehicles (Kraftfahrt-Bundesamt), 5487 private cars were registered in St. Pauli.
Paul Montgomery "Pauly" Shore (born February 1, 1968) is an American comedian and actor who starred in several comedy films in the 1990s and hosted a video show on MTV in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Shore is still performing stand-up comedy and toured in 2012. Shore was born Paul Montgomery Shore, the son of Mitzi Shore (née Saidel), who founded The Comedy Store, and Sammy Shore, a comedian. Shore was raised Jewish, and grew up in Beverly Hills, California. He graduated from Beverly Hills High School in 1986. Inspired by his parents' work in comedy and show business, a 17-year-old Shore made his stand-up debut at the Alley Cat Bistro in Culver City. "Everyone else in school was filling out their SAT applications, but I just passed mine back. I knew I wasn't going to go to college." Shore was mentored by Sam Kinison and opened several of his sets. While touring the comedy club circuit, Shore cultivated an alter ego persona, "The Weasel". "The Weasel" involved Shore speaking in a Jeff Spicoli-esque surfer parlance, heavily peppered with dudespeak slang such as "edged", "melons" and "grinding" as well as his catchphrase, "Hey, BU-DDY." Shore's big break came as an on-air MTV VJ, a position he held from 1989 to 1994. At the height of his MTV fame, Shore had his own show, Totally Pauly, serving as a host, most memorably on MTV's annual Spring Break parties. He also released a music video, "Lisa, Lisa, The One I Adore". In 1992, Shore starred in Encino Man which was a modest hit. Encino Man's success propelled Shore to star in additional personalized vehicles, albeit less successful: Son in Law (1993), In the Army Now (1994), Jury Duty (1995), and Bio-Dome (1996). (All five films received sharply negative reviews, with the last three each holding a rare 0% rating at Rotten Tomatoes; in addition, each of the movies grossed less at the box office than the one before.) He makes a cameo appearance in the American rock band Limp Bizkit music video "N 2 Gether Now", as a pizza deliveryman, and a briefer appearance in Break Stuff. In 2003, Shore produced, wrote, directed and starred in Pauly Shore Is Dead, a semi-autobiographical mockumentary, and in 2005 starred in the short lived reality television series Minding the Store. In 2010 Shore starred in Adopted, which sees him traveling to Africa to adopt a child. In addition, he has several short subject films and multiple projects in the works such as his MTV pilot called The Shores and various projects with such as Funny or Die. Shore claimed, in 2009, that Sacha Baron Cohen's film, Brüno, was "stolen from his 'mockumentary'", as the film Brüno had started production after the start of production for Adopted and also featured the main character adopting a child from a Third World nation.
Wolfgang Ernst Pauli (25 April 1900 – 15 December 1958) was an Austrian theoretical physicist and one of the pioneers of quantum physics. In 1945, after being nominated by Albert Einstein, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for his "decisive contribution through his discovery of a new law of Nature, the exclusion principle or Pauli principle," involving spin theory, underpinning the structure of matter and the whole of chemistry. Pauli was born in Vienna to a chemist Wolfgang Joseph Pauli ( Wolf Pascheles, 1869–1955) and his wife Bertha Camilla Schütz. His middle name was given in honor of his godfather, physicist Ernst Mach. Pauli's paternal grandparents were from prominent Jewish families of Prague; his great-grandfather was the Jewish publisher Wolf Pascheles. Pauli's father converted from Judaism to Roman Catholicism shortly before his marriage in 1899. Pauli's mother, Bertha Schütz, was raised in her own mother's Roman Catholic religion; her father was Jewish writer Friedrich Schütz. Pauli was raised as a Roman Catholic, although eventually he and his parents left the Church. He is considered to have been a deist and a mystic. Pauli attended the Döblinger-Gymnasium in Vienna, graduating with distinction in 1918. Only two months after graduation, the young prodigy published his first paper, on Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. He attended the Ludwig-Maximilians University in Munich, working under Arnold Sommerfeld, where he received his PhD in July 1921 for his thesis on the quantum theory of ionized molecular hydrogen. Sommerfeld asked Pauli to review the theory of relativity for the Encyklopädie der mathematischen Wissenschaften (Encyclopedia of Mathematical Sciences). Two months after receiving his doctorate, Pauli completed the article, which came to 237 pages. It was praised by Einstein; published as a monograph, it remains a standard reference on the subject to this day. Pauli spent a year at the University of Göttingen as the assistant to Max Born, and the following year at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Copenhagen, which later became the Niels Bohr Institute in 1965. From 1923 to 1928, he was a lecturer at the University of Hamburg. During this period, Pauli was instrumental in the development of the modern theory of quantum mechanics. In particular, he formulated the exclusion principle and the theory of nonrelativistic spin. In 1928, he was appointed Professor of Theoretical Physics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland where he made significant scientific progress. He held visiting professorships at the University of Michigan in 1931, and the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton in 1935. He was awarded the Lorentz Medal in 1931. At the end of 1930, shortly after his postulation of the neutrino and immediately following his divorce in November, Pauli had a severe breakdown. He consulted psychiatrist and psychotherapist Carl Jung who, like Pauli, lived near Zurich. Jung immediately began interpreting Pauli's deeply archetypal dreams, and Pauli became one of the depth psychologist’s best students. He soon began to criticize the epistemology of Jung’s theory scientifically, and this contributed to a certain clarification of the latter’s thoughts, especially about the concept of synchronicity. A great many of these discussions are documented in the Pauli/Jung letters, today published as Atom and Archetype. Jung's elaborate analysis of more than 400 of Pauli's dreams is documented in Psychology and Alchemy. The German annexation of Austria in 1938 made him a German national, which became a difficulty with the outbreak of World War II in 1939. In 1940 he tried, in vain, to obtain Swiss citizenship, which would have allowed him to remain at the ETH. Pauli moved to the United States in 1940, where he was Professor of Theoretical Physics at IAS. After the war, in 1946, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States, before returning to Zurich, where he mostly remained for the rest of his life. In 1949 he finally gained Swiss citizenship as well. In 1958, Pauli was awarded the Max Planck medal. In that same year, he fell ill with pancreatic cancer. When his last assistant, Charles Enz, visited him at the Rotkreuz hospital in Zurich, Pauli asked him: “Did you see the room number?” It was number 137. Throughout his life, Pauli had been preoccupied with the question of why the fine structure constant, a dimensionless fundamental constant, has a value nearly equal to 1/137. Pauli died in that room on 15 December 1958. Pauli made many important contributions in his career as a physicist, primarily in the field of quantum mechanics. He seldom published papers, preferring lengthy correspondences with colleagues such as Niels Bohr and Werner Heisenberg, with whom he had close friendships. Many of his ideas and results were never published and appeared only in his letters, which were often copied and circulated by their recipients. Pauli proposed in 1924 a new quantum degree of freedom (or quantum number) with two possible values, in order to resolve inconsistencies between observed molecular spectra and the developing theory of quantum mechanics. He formulated the Pauli exclusion principle, perhaps his most important work, which stated that no two electrons could exist in the same quantum state, identified by four quantum numbers including his new two-valued degree of freedom. The idea of spin originated with Ralph Kronig. George Uhlenbeck and Samuel Goudsmit one year later identified Pauli's new degree of freedom as electron spin. In 1926, shortly after Heisenberg published the matrix theory of modern quantum mechanics, Pauli used it to derive the observed spectrum of the hydrogen atom. This result was important in securing credibility for Heisenberg's theory. Pauli introduced the 2 × 2 Pauli matrices as a basis of spin operators, thus solving the nonrelativistic theory of spin. This work is sometimes said to have influenced Paul Dirac in his creation of the Dirac equation for the relativistic electron, though Dirac stated that he invented these same matrices himself independently at the time, without Pauli's influence. Dirac invented similar but larger (4x4) spin matrices for use in his relativistic treatment of fermionic spin. In 1930, Pauli considered the problem of beta decay. In a letter of 4 December to Lise Meitner et al., beginning, "Dear radioactive ladies and gentlemen", he proposed the existence of a hitherto unobserved neutral particle with a small mass, no greater than 1% the mass of a proton, in order to explain the continuous spectrum of beta decay. In 1934, Enrico Fermi incorporated the particle, which he called a neutrino, into his theory of beta decay. The neutrino was first confirmed experimentally in 1956 by Frederick Reines and Clyde Cowan, two and a half years before Pauli's death. On receiving the news, he replied by telegram: "Thanks for message. Everything comes to him who knows how to wait. Pauli." In 1940, he proved the spin-statistics theorem, a critical result of quantum field theory which states that particles with half-integer spin are fermions, while particles with integer spin are bosons. In 1949, he published a paper on Pauli–Villars regularization: regularization is the term for techniques which modify infinite mathematical integrals to make them finite during calculations, so that one can identify whether the intrinsically infinite quantities in the theory (mass, charge, wavefunction) form a finite and hence calculable set which can be redefined in terms of their experimental values, which criterion is termed renormalization, and which removes infinities from quantum field theories, but also importantly allows the calculation of higher order corrections in perturbation theory. Pauli made repeated criticisms of the modern synthesis of evolutionary biology, and his contemporary admirers point to modes of epigenetic inheritance as supportive of his arguments. The Pauli effect was named after the anecdotal bizarre ability of his to break experimental equipment simply by being in the vicinity. Pauli was aware of his reputation and was delighted whenever the Pauli effect manifested. These strange occurrences were in line with his investigations into the legitimacy of parapsychology, particularly his collaboration with C. G. Jung on the concept of synchronicity. Regarding physics, Pauli was famously a perfectionist. This extended not just to his own work, but also to the work of his colleagues. As a result, he became known in the physics community as the "conscience of physics," the critic to whom his colleagues were accountable. He could be scathing in his dismissal of any theory he found lacking, often labelling it ganz falsch, utterly wrong. However, this was not his most severe criticism, which he reserved for theories or theses so unclearly presented as to be untestable or unevaluatable and, thus, not properly belonging within the realm of science, even though posing as such. They were worse than wrong because they could not be proven wrong. Famously, he once said of such an unclear paper: It is not even wrong!" His supposed remarks when meeting another leading physicist, Paul Ehrenfest, illustrates this notion of an arrogant Pauli. The two met at a conference for the first time. Ehrenfest was familiar with Pauli's papers and was quite impressed with them. After a few minutes of conversation, Ehrenfest remarked, "I think I like your Encyclopedia article [on relativity theory] better than I like you," to which Pauli shot back, "That's strange. With me, regarding you, it is just the opposite." The two became very good friends from then on. A somewhat warmer picture emerges from this story which appears in the article on Dirac: "Werner Heisenberg [in Physics and Beyond, 1971] recollects a friendly conversation among young participants at the 1927 Solvay Conference, about Einstein and Planck's views on religion. Wolfgang Pauli, Heisenberg, and Dirac took part in it. Dirac's contribution was a poignant and clear criticism of the political manipulation of religion, that was much appreciated for its lucidity by Bohr, when Heisenberg reported it to him later. Among other things, Dirac said: "I cannot understand why we idle discussing religion. If we are honest – and as scientists honesty is our precise duty – we cannot help but admit that any religion is a pack of false statements, deprived of any real foundation. The very idea of God is a product of human imagination. [...] I do not recognize any religious myth, at least because they contradict one another. [...]" Heisenberg's view was tolerant. Pauli had kept silent, after some initial remarks. But when finally he was asked for his opinion, jokingly he said: "Well, I'd say that also our friend Dirac has got a religion and the first commandment of this religion is 'God does not exist and Paul Dirac is his prophet'". Everybody burst into laughter, including Dirac. Many of Pauli's ideas and results were never published and appeared only in his letters, which were often copied and circulated by their recipients. Pauli may have been unconcerned that much of his work thus went uncredited, but when it came to Heisenberg's world-renowned, 1958, Lecture at Göttingen on their joint work on a unified field theory, and the press release calling Pauli a mere "assistant to Professor Heisenberg", Pauli became offended, shooting back several times over the years at CERN and elsewhere by denouncing Heisenberg's physics prowess. The deterioration between them resulted in Heisenberg ignoring Pauli's funeral, and writing in his autobiography that Pauli's criticisms were overwrought. In May 1929, Pauli left the Roman Catholic Church. In December of that year, he married Käthe Margarethe Deppner. The marriage was an unhappy one, ending in divorce in 1930 after less than a year. He married again in 1934 to Franziska Bertram. They had no children.
Paul DelVecchio (born July 5, 1980), publicly known as DJ Pauly D, is an American television personality and disc jockey. He is best known for being a housemate on MTV's reality show Jersey Shore. In August 2011, he announced a pending three-album deal with 50 Cent's G-Unit Records and G-Note Records. This deal was later confirmed by 50 Cent on December 1, 2011. He is also the first of the Jersey Shore cast to get his own spin-off show, The Pauly D Project. DelVecchio was born on July 5, 1980 and raised in the Providence, Rhode Island area, and in Johnston, Rhode Island. He attended Johnston High School. He began his career as a local DJ under the moniker Pauly D. One of his professional idols was DJ AM. DelVecchio was cast in 2009 for Jersey Shore. He has stated that his being chosen for Jersey Shore had nothing to do with his music, but that they instead sent him a Myspace message after liking his look. After he sent them his number, "The casting directors called me from LA and they said they wanted to send down a camera crew to Rhode Island to film a day in my life. They filmed me at the gym, filmed me tanning and filmed me going to the club. Six months later they said I got on the show. I never really auditioned." His appearance in the show resulted in popularity with what TIME dubbed "seriously rabid fans." He won the 2011 Teen Choice Award for Choice Reality Star: Male. He was a contestant in June 2012 on the Fox show called The Choice. DelVecchio is the first housemate from Jersey Shore to receive his own spin-off. It will focus on his DJ career as he goes on a tour around America. Filming commences in 2012. According to TIME, "We're guessing Pauly D got the spot [instead of Nicole Polizzi or Michael Sorrentino] because he genuinely seems fun and easy to get along with. He's not known for diva antics like The Situation and doesn't appear a drunken mess at times, like Nicole and Michael do." The show, originally called DelVecchio was later renamed The Pauly D Project. It premiered on MTV on March 29, 2012. In 2010, DelVecchio released a single, "Beat Dat Beat (It's Time To)". He was also nominated for the "America's Best DJ" competition in 2010 and 2011. After numerous rumours, on August 11, 2011, Pauly D confirmed to XXL that he had signed a three album deal with 50 Cent's labels G-Unit Records & G-Note Records and that he will also be releasing headphones under the label. In 2011, it was announced that DelVecchio would open for Britney Spears on her Femme Fatale Tour in North America on selected cities and dates. In July 2012, DelVecchio tweeted that Big Sean was with him in the studio working on his new album, which will be released in 2013. On the August 13th episode of WWE Raw, it was announced that Pauly D would be the social media ambassador for SummerSlam. Pauly D released his first single of debut album, called "Back to Love", on January 15, 2012, featuring British singer Jay Sean.
Pauly is a surname. Notable people with the surname include:
Christoph Brüx (born 13 December 1965) is a German composer, pianist, keyboardist, arranger and music producer. He composed for interpreters such as No Angels, Matthias Reim, The Underdog Project, Brooklyn Bounce etc., and he also composed film scores. Christoph Brüx was born in Sonsbeck (North Rhine-Westphalia). Until 1985 he went to school (Städtisches Stiftsgymnasium Xanten). Following his talent in music, he early began taking piano lessons and later he graduated at a music conservatoire.
Brüx was composing for several interpreters such as: He wrote music for several films (also industry and corporate videos): Already in the youth his sensitivity showed up in relation to its environment. His large respect for nature particularly to results in his touching underwater video "Niklas' Theme". Today Christoph Brüx is working and living in Hamburg, Germany, where he in his studio besides music even with the visual arts (painting, sculpture) engaged.
Steven Van Zandt (born November 22, 1950) is an American musician, songwriter, arranger, record producer, actor, and radio disc jockey, who frequently goes by the stage names Little Steven or Miami Steve. He is a member of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, in which he plays guitar and mandolin, and has acted in television dramas The Sopranos (1999–2007), in which he played the character Silvio Dante, and Lilyhammer (2012–present), in which he plays the character Frank "The Fixer" Tagliano. Van Zandt also had his own solo band called "Little Steven and The Disciples of Soul" in the 1980s. Van Zandt was born as Steven Lento in Winthrop, Massachusetts, of South Italian descent (his grandfather was from Calabria and his grandmother's parents were Neapolitans. His mother, Mary Lento, remarried when he was young and Steven took the last name of his stepfather, William Van Zandt. The family moved from Massachusetts to Middletown Township, New Jersey when he was seven. Actor/playwright/producer Billy Van Zandt is Steven's half brother. Van Zandt grew up in the Jersey Shore music scene, and was an early friend and pre-E Street bandmate of Bruce Springsteen. In the early seventies, he was a journeyman guitarist (working as a sideman for The Dovells) as well as a founding member of Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes and several of Bruce Springsteen's early bands. In 1975, during the recording sessions for Born to Run, Springsteen - at a loss (according to author Dave Marsh in the Springsteen biography Born To Run) for ideas on how to arrange the horn part for "Tenth Avenue Freeze-Out" - called on Van Zandt and his encyclopedic knowledge of soul music for help with the arrangement. In the Wings for Wheels documentary, Springsteen revealed that Van Zandt was partially responsible for the signature guitar line in "Born to Run"; "Arguably Steve's greatest contribution to my music." Van Zandt then joined the E Street Band in the midst of their Born to Run tours. In those early years, Van Zandt supplied a great deal of the lead guitar work for the band in concert, as can be seen on the 1975 concert DVD within Born to Run 30th Anniversary Edition (later released as the CD Hammersmith Odeon London '75). Van Zandt cites the Dave Clark Five as an early influence. Along with Paul Shaffer of the David Letterman Show he organized a benefit for Mike Smith (the Dave Clark Five's lead singer), who had suffered a paralyzing fall at his home in Spain. Van Zandt subsequently became a songwriter and producer for fellow Jersey shore act Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes in the mid- to late-1970s, penning their signature song "I Don't Wanna Go Home", co-writing other songs for them with Springsteen, and producing their most-acclaimed record, Hearts of Stone. As such, Van Zandt became a key contributor to the Jersey Shore sound. Van Zandt then went on to share production credits on the classic Springsteen albums Darkness on the Edge of Town, The River, and Born in the U.S.A.. In 1989, Jackson Browne covered the 1983 Van Zandt composition "I Am A Patriot" for Browne's World in Motion album. The song has also been covered by other artists including Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam. Van Zandt has produced a number of other records, including an uncredited effort on the Iron City Houserockers' Have A Good Time (But Get Out Alive). Less successful was his work on Lone Justice's second album Shelter, which was a career-ending flop for the Los Angeles cowpunk band. In 1993, Van Zandt wrote and produced "All Alone on Christmas" for the soundtrack of the Chris Columbus film Home Alone, which yielded singer Darlene Love her first hit since "A Fine, Fine Boy" from 1963, thirty-one years earlier. In 1994, Van Zandt produced the eponymous debut album of the punk rock band Demolition 23 which featured ex-Hanoi Rocks members Michael Monroe and Sami Yaffa. Van Zandt also co-wrote six songs for the album with Monroe and Jude Wilder. In 1995, Van Zandt aided Meat Loaf with the song "Amnesty Is Granted" off of his "Welcome to the Neighborhood" album. In 2004, he contributed the song "Baby Please Don't Go" to Nancy Sinatra's self-titled album. Van Zandt officially left the E Street Band in 1984, though he would rejoin it in 1999 (Springsteen's song "Bobby Jean" is said to be inspired by the split, and Bruce asked him to perform his mandolin solo in the "Glory Days" video anyway). Since 1984 he has been involved in numerous solo musical projects and collaborations, ranging from soul music to hard rock to world music. In particular, he released four albums in the 1980s and one in 1999, sometimes fronting an on-and-off group known as Little Steven and the Disciples of Soul. Van Zandt has written that these albums are each elements in a five-part concept cycle. The first of them, 1982's Men Without Women, earned the most critical praise (Jay Cocks of TIME magazine dubbed it one of the ten best albums of the year), while its follow-up, 1984's Voice of America, did the best on the U.S. albums chart, although none of them were much of a commercial success. With Voice of America, his music became explicitly political, with the central theme being opposition to Ronald Reagan-era American foreign policy. Continuing his involvement in issues of the day, in 1985 he created the music-industry activist group Artists United Against Apartheid as an action against the Sun City resort in South Africa. Forty-nine recording artists, including Springsteen, U2, Bob Dylan, Pete Townshend, Joey Ramone, Tom Petty, Afrika Bambaataa and Run DMC, collaborated on a song called "Sun City" in which they pledged they would never perform at the resort. The song was modestly successful, and played a part in the broad international effort to overthrow apartheid. In 1987, he released the album Freedom - No Compromise, which continued the political messaging. Some U.S. appearances in that year as opening act for U2's arena-and-stadium Joshua Tree Tour continued in the same vein – Oliver North was labeled a "criminal motherfucker" – but were not well received by some audiences. Both the record and his concerts were popular in Europe. Little Steven's fourth album, 1989's Revolution, attracted little attention. His next album, entitled Born Again Savage was released in 1999. Since then, Van Zandt has recorded another album, Nobody Loves and Leaves Alive with his garage band the Lost Boys. Although the album remains unreleased, three tracks from it were heard on the Sopranos television show:'Nobody Love and Leaves Alive', 'Affection', and 'Come for Me'. Steven's song Under The Gun was covered by Carla Olson & The Textones on their "Detroit '85 Live & Unreleased" album which was released in 2008. Another of Steven's songs, All I Needed Was You, will appear on the 2012 Carla Olson album "Have Harmony, Will Travel." Van Zandt returned to the E Street Band when it was reformed (briefly in 1995, and on an ongoing basis since 1999) and remains with it. By now, his guitar playing had mostly been reduced to a background rhythm role, due to Nils Lofgren's position in the band and his capability as a lead guitarist. In addition, Springsteen had begun taking many more of the solos during Van Zandt's absence. Notwithstanding this, among E Street Band members he often had the second-most amount of "face time" in concert after Clarence Clemons, frequently mugging and posing for the audience and sometimes delivering his unpolished, nasal backing vocals while sharing a microphone with Springsteen. His playing or singing is most prominently featured on the songs "Glory Days", "Two Hearts", "Long Walk Home" (when featured a Van Zandt outro vocal solo) "Land of Hope and Dreams", "Badlands", "Ramrod", and "Murder Incorporated", among others like the live versions of "Rosalita". He often trades vocals with Springsteen in live versions of "Prove it All Night". He features prominently in the video for "Glory Days", sharing the spotlight with Springsteen during the choruses, while swapping lines with him during the (non)fade, and in live versions he does the same. During the E Street Band's performance at the Super Bowl in 2009, Van Zandt was the most prominently featured member of the band, playing a guitar solo on the final number of the set, "Glory Days" (although the solo could not be heard in the mix), as well as sharing lead vocals and exchanging humorous banter with Springsteen. In 1999, Van Zandt took one of the core roles in The Sopranos, playing level-headed but deadly mob consigliere and strip club owner Silvio Dante. Van Zandt had no acting experience, and the unusual casting choice was made by series creator David Chase. As a guest on the Opie and Anthony Show, Van Zandt related the story of his casting on The Sopranos. Van Zandt was picked to induct The Rascals into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1997. The original members of The Rascals had been feuding for a number of years and Van Zandt was concerned that the induction and subsequent band performance would result in a very public fiasco on live television. Wanting to defuse any confrontation, Van Zandt donned a Little Lord Fauntleroy-type costume for the event and delivered a humorous induction instead of the more traditional speech delivered for other inductees. The Rascals had worn this type of outfit when they debuted on the national scene in 1965. Chase, a fan of Van Zandt's music, saw this performance on VH1's broadcast of the event and thought that Van Zandt was very funny and contacted him a few days later. It was then that Chase discovered that Van Zandt had no acting experience. Van Zandt was reluctant to audition for Chase but eventually relented. His first audition was for the role of the show's main character, Tony Soprano however Van Zandt wanted the role to go to a real actor. The character of Silvio Dante was actually based on a character created for a short story written by Van Zandt. Van Zandt gained acclaim for his performance as Silvio, but has contended that he has no interest in acting beyond The Sopranos. However, in 2011, he starred in, co-wrote and acted as executive producer on an English and Norwegian language series entitled Lilyhammer, a Netflix Internet movie site original program. On the show, Van Zandt portrays a Soprano-like role of an ex-mafioso who flees to Norway to escape a colleague against whom he testified. The show premiered on 25 January 2012 with a record audience of 998,000 viewers (one fifth of Norway's population), and is green-lit for a second season. He also found time to record the narration to a Hives biography on their concert DVD Tussles in Brussels. His role on The Sopranos resumed in importance in later seasons, with sixth season plot developments especially giving him prime focus. His real-life wife Maureen Van Zandt is an actress who made occasional appearances on The Sopranos playing Silvio's wife Gabriella Dante. Van Zandt maintains a certain look, always wearing gypsy clothes and a bandana on stage, while donning a noticeable pompadour toupee on The Sopranos. Both are to cover permanent loss of hair from a car accident in which he hit a windshield with his head. In 2010, Van Zandt appeared as himself in the Norwegian soap opera Hotel Cæsar, broadcast on Norway's biggest commercial channel TV2 Norway. He also appeared on Scandinavia's largest talkshow Skavlan. Since 2002, Van Zandt has hosted Little Steven's Underground Garage, a weekly syndicated radio show that celebrates garage rock and similar rock sub-genres from the 1950s to the present day. As of December 2006, the show is heard on over 200 US radio stations and in some international markets. For example, in Finland, Radio Helsinki started beaming Underground Garage in August 2008 and in Spain is beamed through Rock & Gol since 2007 and later on Rock Rock Radio. On October 20, 2011, the program recorded its 500th show in front of a sold out crowd at the Hard Rock Cafe in New York's Times Square. The guests included the band Green Day, Steve Buscemi, star of The Sopranos and Boardwalk Empire, Vincent Pastore, aka "Big Pussy" from the The Sopranos, actor and director Tim Robbins, and singer Debbie Harry of the group Blondie. Steven is also the program director for two radio channels for the Sirius Satellite Radio network. The channels are heard continuously on satellite radio in the USA and worldwide on Sirius Internet Radio. One channel is named Underground Garage, which has the same philosophy and musical mandate as his own radio show. On-air hosts on the channel include original Rolling Stones manager/producer Andrew Loog Oldham, singer/guitarist Joan Jett, former record executive Kid Leo, punk rock singer Handsome Dick Manitoba, and rock entrepreneur Kim Fowley. The second of Van Zandt's radio channels presented on Sirius is named the Outlaw Country channel. It presents the edgier side of country music – both roots and contemporary. On-air hosts for this channel include pop-culture satirist Mojo Nixon. Van Zandt is not to be confused with similarly named radio personality Steve Van Zandt, who was co-host of the "Steve and Jackie in the Morning" show formerly airing on WROW in Albany, New York. In December 2006, Little Steven launched his own record label, Wicked Cool Records. The first set of records released by Wicked Cool were new albums from Underground Garage favorites the Charms, the Chesterfield Kings and the Cocktail Slippers; and ‘Fuzz For The Holidays,’ by Davie Allan and the Arrows and ‘CBGB Forever,’ a tribute to the famous, now-defunct venue. The label continues to release new albums from the next generation of garage rockers including the Cocktail Slippers as well as volumes of ‘Little Steven's Underground Garage presents The Coolest Songs in the World,’ a compilation of selected songs from the Underground Garage radio show's popular feature, the Coolest Song in the World This Week. In 2007 the label signed The Launderettes. 2008 marked the release of the labels first Halloween and Christmas themed compilations. Lost Cathedral is a subsidiary label of Wicked Cool Records and home to the band Crown of Thorns. In 2007, Van Zandt launched his Rock And Roll Forever Foundation. The first incentive of the foundation is Rock And Roll High School, a chronological anthology tracing the history of Rock and Roll from its roots to present day, highlighting the cultural impact and significance of each era of the genre as it relates to the events and changes that took place in the history of the country and of the world. The program, endorsed by MENC: The National Association For Music Education and Scholastic, is being written and hopes to launch in the fall of 2010. In September 2006, Van Zandt assembled and directed an all-star band to back Hank Williams Jr. on a new version of "All My Rowdy Friends Are Coming Over Tonight" for the season premiere (and formal ESPN debut) of Monday Night Football. The all-star lineup included Little Richard, Rick Nielsen (Cheap Trick), Joe Perry (Aerosmith), Questlove (The Roots), Charlie Daniels, Bootsy Collins, Chris Burney (Bowling for Soup), and Bernie Worrell. Steve is now the director of a music selection committee for the video game Rock Band; he is in charge of selecting new music for the game. Van Zandt is married to actress Maureen Van Zandt (formerly Maureen Santoro) who portrayed his wife Gabriella Dante in the TV series The Sopranos. They married in New York City on December 31, 1982. Bruce Springsteen was the best man at the ceremony, which was presided over by Reverend Richard Penniman (Little Richard). Singer Percy Sledge sang his classic "When a Man Loves a Woman" at the reception. Southside Johnny & The Asbury Jukes Ronnie Spector & the E Street Band Gary U.S. Bonds Artists United Against Apartheid Iron City Houserockers Meat Loaf Davie Allan & the Arrows
Beta Night Club Beta Night Club

Paul DelVecchio (born July 5, 1980), publicly known as DJ Pauly D, is an American television personality and disc jockey. He is best known for being a housemate on MTV's reality show Jersey Shore.

In August 2011, he announced a pending three-album deal with 50 Cent's G-Unit Records and G-Note Records. This deal was later confirmed by 50 Cent on December 1, 2011. He is also the first of the Jersey Shore cast to get his own spin-off show, The Pauly D Project.

Pauly

Daniel Pauly is a French-born marine biologist, well known for his work in studying human impacts on global fisheries. He is a professor and the project leader of the Sea Around Us Project at the Fisheries Centre at the University of British Columbia. He also served as Director of the Fisheries Centre from November 2003 to October 2008.

Pauly was born in Paris, France. He grew up, however, in Switzerland in what was called a strange "Dickensian" childhood where he was forced to stay as a live-in servant to a new family. For the first 16 years of his life, Pauly lived an inward life as he was mixed race in an all white town, finding solace in books/reading and model construction. At 16 he ran away and put himself through high school in Wuppertal, Germany after one year working with disabled people for a local church-run institution. His work led to a scholarship to the University of Kiel.

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