Question:

Where did the phrase 'boom goes the dynamite' come from and what does it mean?

Answer:

Boom goes the dynamite is a catchphrase that was used by Brian Collins a student at Ball State University during a tournament.

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Brian Collins

Ball State University is a public research university located in Muncie, Indiana, United States. On July 25, 1917, the Ball Brothers, industrialists and founders of the Ball Corporation, acquired the foreclosed Indiana Normal Institute for $35,100 and gifted the school and surrounding land to Indiana. The Indiana General Assembly accepted it in the spring of 1918, with the initial 235 students enrolling at the Indiana State Normal School–Eastern Division on June 17, 1918.

Ball State is classified by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education as a high research activity university and a member of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. The university is composed of seven academic colleges, including the College of Architecture and Planning, the College of Communication, Information, and Media, the Miller College of Business, and Teachers College. Other academic institutions include Burris Laboratory School and the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities.

Ball State University is a public research university located in Muncie, Indiana, United States. On July 25, 1917, the Ball Brothers, industrialists and founders of the Ball Corporation, acquired the foreclosed Indiana Normal Institute for $35,100 and gifted the school and surrounding land to Indiana. The Indiana General Assembly accepted it in the spring of 1918, with the initial 235 students enrolling at the Indiana State Normal School–Eastern Division on June 17, 1918.

Ball State is classified by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education as a high research activity university and a member of the American Association of State Colleges and Universities. The university is composed of seven academic colleges, including the College of Architecture and Planning, the College of Communication, Information, and Media, the Miller College of Business, and Teachers College. Other academic institutions include Burris Laboratory School and the Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics, and Humanities.

Catchphrase Dynamite Boom

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Television Technology

Boom goes the dynamite! is the enthusiastic catchphrase coined by Ball State University sportscaster Brian Collins while covering the March 22, 2005 NBA game between the Indiana Pacers and New Jersey Nets. The phrase can be heard as Pacers shooting guard Fred Jones hits a 3 with 2:03 left in the first quarter.

During his freshman year, Collins agreed to appear on Ball State University's campus newscast in place of the regular sportscaster, who was ill. The teleprompter was operational, but an inexperienced operator accidentally fast-forwarded through the script, leaving Collins with no choice but to ad-lib most of his script. Eventually posted on YouTube, the newscast is now known as "the Collins incident" in communications classes.

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