Question:

Where did Helen Keller go to college?

Answer:

In fall of 1900, Helen Keller entered Radcliffe College and received her bachelor of arts in 1904. AnswerParty!

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Radcliffe College

Radcliffe College, formerly a women's liberal arts college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was all-male Harvard College's coordinate institution for female students. It was also one of the Seven Sisters colleges, amongst which it shared with Bryn Mawr College the popular reputation of having a particularly intellectual and independent-minded student body. Radcliffe conferred Radcliffe College diplomas to undergraduates and graduate students for the first 70 or so years of its history and then joint Harvard-Radcliffe diplomas to undergraduates beginning in 1963. A formal "non-merger merger" agreement with Harvard was signed in 1977, with full integration with Harvard completed in 1999. Today, within Harvard University, Radcliffe's former administrative campus (Radcliffe Yard) is home to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and former Radcliffe housing at the Radcliffe Quadrangle (Pforzheimer House, Cabot House, and Currier House) has been incorporated into the Harvard College house system. Under the terms of the 1999 consolidation, the Radcliffe Yard and the Radcliffe Quadrangle maintain the "Radcliffe" designation in perpetuity.

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth.

A prolific author, Keller was well-travelled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women's suffrage, labor rights, socialism, and other radical left causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1971.


Radcliffe College

Radcliffe College, formerly a women's liberal arts college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was all-male Harvard College's coordinate institution for female students. It was also one of the Seven Sisters colleges, amongst which it shared with Bryn Mawr College the popular reputation of having a particularly intellectual and independent-minded student body. Radcliffe conferred Radcliffe College diplomas to undergraduates and graduate students for the first 70 or so years of its history and then joint Harvard-Radcliffe diplomas to undergraduates beginning in 1963. A formal "non-merger merger" agreement with Harvard was signed in 1977, with full integration with Harvard completed in 1999. Today, within Harvard University, Radcliffe's former administrative campus (Radcliffe Yard) is home to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and former Radcliffe housing at the Radcliffe Quadrangle (Pforzheimer House, Cabot House, and Currier House) has been incorporated into the Harvard College house system. Under the terms of the 1999 consolidation, the Radcliffe Yard and the Radcliffe Quadrangle maintain the "Radcliffe" designation in perpetuity.


Radcliffe College

Radcliffe College, formerly a women's liberal arts college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, was all-male Harvard College's coordinate institution for female students. It was also one of the Seven Sisters colleges, amongst which it shared with Bryn Mawr College the popular reputation of having a particularly intellectual and independent-minded student body. Radcliffe conferred Radcliffe College diplomas to undergraduates and graduate students for the first 70 or so years of its history and then joint Harvard-Radcliffe diplomas to undergraduates beginning in 1963. A formal "non-merger merger" agreement with Harvard was signed in 1977, with full integration with Harvard completed in 1999. Today, within Harvard University, Radcliffe's former administrative campus (Radcliffe Yard) is home to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, and former Radcliffe housing at the Radcliffe Quadrangle (Pforzheimer House, Cabot House, and Currier House) has been incorporated into the Harvard College house system. Under the terms of the 1999 consolidation, the Radcliffe Yard and the Radcliffe Quadrangle maintain the "Radcliffe" designation in perpetuity.

Baseball Keller

A biographical film, or biopic (/ˈbɵpɪk/; abbreviation for biographical motion picture), is a film that dramatizes the life of an actual person or people. Such films show the life of a historical person and the central character’s real name is used. They differ from films "based on a true story" or “historical films” in that they attempt to comprehensively tell a person’s life story or at least the most historically important years of their lives.

Because the figures portrayed are actual people, whose actions and characteristics are known to the public (or at least historically documented), biopic roles are considered some of the most demanding of actors and actresses. Johnny Depp, Jim Carrey, and Jamie Foxx all gained respect as dramatic actors after starring in biopics: Depp as Edward D. Wood, Jr. in Ed Wood (1994), Carrey as Andy Kaufman in Man on the Moon (1999), and Foxx as Ray Charles in Ray (2004).

This is a hidden category. It is not shown on its member pages, unless the corresponding user preference 'Show hidden categories' is set.

This category is for individuals whose year of birth has not been indicated in their biography. It is specifically designed to list the names of historically recent people who are no longer alive, as well as those in Category:Possibly living people.

Helen Keller: The Miracle Continues is a 1984 semisequel to the 1979 telefilm version of The Miracle Worker. It is a drama based on the life of Helen Keller.

The film covers the period of Keller's life from her college years at Radcliffe through her writing of The Story of My Life assisted by John Macy, who falls in love with and marries Keller's teacher and companion, Anne Sullivan. Keller wants to live a full life but is hampered by her actual disabilities and by people's attitudes and beliefs about the disabled at that time. Sullivan is hampered by psychological problems from her own past, as well as by her symbiotic, almost codependent bond with Keller, which affects Macy to the extent that he eventually self-destructs into alcoholism. Keller and Sullivan raise money by going on the road with a lecture tour where they describe her education.

Helen Keller in Her Story (also known as The Unconquered) is an American biographical documentary about Helen Keller made in 1954.

It won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature in 1955. It starred Helen Keller and used extensive footage of her visits/remembrances of Dwight Eisenhower, Martha Graham and others. The film was narrated by her friend, actress Katharine Cornell, and was shot mostly in Pittsburgh.


Helen Keller

Helen Adams Keller (June 27, 1880 – June 1, 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker. Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, the 100th anniversary of her birth.

A prolific author, Keller was well-travelled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women's suffrage, labor rights, socialism, and other radical left causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1971.


United States

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (US), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic consisting of 50 states, 16 territories, and a federal district. The 48 contiguous states and the federal district of Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific. The country also has five populated and nine unpopulated territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. At 3.79 million square miles (9.83 million km2) in total and with around 316 million people, the United States is the fourth-largest country by total area and third largest by population. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries. The geography and climate of the United States is also extremely diverse, and it is home to a wide variety of wildlife.

Paleo-indians migrated from Asia to what is now the US mainland around 15,000 years ago, with European colonization beginning in the 16th century. The United States emerged from 13 British colonies located along the Atlantic seaboard. Disputes between Great Britain and these colonies led to the American Revolution. On July 4, 1776, delegates from the 13 colonies unanimously issued the Declaration of Independence. The ensuing war ended in 1783 with the recognition of independence of the United States from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and was the first successful war of independence against a European colonial empire. The current Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787. The first 10 amendments, collectively named the Bill of Rights, were ratified in 1791 and guarantee many fundamental civil rights and freedoms.

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