Question:

When was the hot pocket invented?

Answer:

Hot Pockets were invented by Paul Merage and David Merage in the 1970s. They founded the company Chef America Inc. and began producing Hot Pockets for

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Lean Cuisine is a brand of frozen entreés and dinners sold in the United States, Canada, and Australia by Nestlé. The brand began as low-fat, low-calorie versions of Stouffer's products. Today, Lean Cuisine includes traditional dinners, ethnic dishes, pizzas, whole-grain Spa Cuisine entreés, and panini. The headquarters of Lean Cuisine in the United States is located in Solon, Ohio, a suburb of Cleveland. Lean Cuisine was created in 1981 to provide a healthier alternative to Stouffer's frozen meals. It began with ten items and has expanded to include 100+ different meals. The brand name "Lean Cuisine" is considered by the FDA as a nutrient content claim, so all Lean Cuisine items are required to meet the "lean" criteria of less than 10 g fat, 4.5 g or less saturated fat, and less than 95 mg cholesterol. Lean Cuisine items are also calorie-controlled, with most items in the 200-300 calorie range, with a minimum of 140 calories and a maximum of 400 calories. A major competitor of Lean Cuisine is Healthy Choice, manufactured by ConAgra Foods. It is required to meet "healthy" criteria by the FDA, since it includes "healthy" in its brand name. This includes a requirement to be below 480 mg of sodium in addition to fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol targets. Other competitors include Smart Ones, made by H. J. Heinz Company, and South Beach Diet, made by Kraft Foods. There are also a number of store brand competitors, such as Safeway's Eating Right brand. Easy Meals and Optislim Lean Cuisine grew significantly during the 1980s and 1990s on the strength of low-fat, low-calorie dieting, becoming one of Nestle's largest U.S. brands. Sales suffered during 2003–2004, as did other diet food brands with the increased popularity of low-carbohydrate diet plans. Lean Cuisine reacted by launching a line of reduced-carb entrees in 2004, and has seen stronger growth as low carb dieting has become less prevalent.][ Lean Cuisine sponsors the Susan G. Komen breast cancer foundation and America on the Move.  
Hot Pockets are microwaveable turnovers generally containing one or more types of cheese, meat, or vegetables. Hot Pockets were founded by the Chef America Inc. company, however since 2002 they have been produced by Nestlé. There are more than 20 varieties of the traditional Hot Pocket, including both breakfast, lunch, and dinner varieties. Nestlé also offers Lean Pockets, Hot Pockets Croissant Crust (formerly called Croissant Pockets), hot Pie Express, Hot Pocket Pizza Minis (originally called Hot Pockets Pizza Snacks), Hot Pockets Subs, Hot Pockets Calzones, Hot Pockets Panini, Hot Pockets Sideshots, and Hot Pockets Breakfast items which include the meat, egg and cheese varieties, and fruit pastries. Hot Pockets were invented by Paul Merage and David Merage in the 1970s. They founded the company Chef America Inc. and began producing Hot Pockets in 1983. In 2002 Chef America was sold to Nestlé, and (as of 2012) Hot Pocket products are "now a $2 billion category of frozen sandwiches and snacks". Initially only available in the United States, they are now sold by Nestlé in France, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom under the Maggi brand. In Mexico they are sold in some supermarkets under the Nestlé brand. In Canada, Nestlé distributes some Hot Pockets products as part of the Stouffer's Bistro or Lean Cuisine lines, although the Hot Pockets brand itself is absent from product packaging. Hot Pockets are produced and sold in Brazil by Sadia. Citing reduced sales, in 2012 Nestlé announced that it would cut employee numbers at its California and Kentucky factories.
Stouffer's is a Nestlé brand of frozen prepared foods available in the United States and Canada. Stouffer's is known for such popular fare as lasagna, macaroni and cheese, meatloaf, ravioli, and salisbury steak. It also produces a line of reduced-fat products under the banner Lean Cuisine. The Stouffer family business traces its roots to 1914 when Abraham E. Stouffer and his father started the Medina County Creamery in Medina County, Ohio and, also, a dairy stand at Cleveland's Sheriff Street Market. In 1916, Abraham and wife Lena moved to the Cleveland suburb of Lakewood, Ohio to manage the creamery business and, in 1922, Abraham resigned as president of the creamery to manage one of the company's dairy stands located on the lower floor of the Cleveland Arcade. The Stouffers converted the operation into a restaurant which served buttermilk, sandwiches, and Lena Stouffer's homemade dutch apple pie (credited by some as the reason for the almost instant success of the restaurant). They opened an additional restaurant on East Ninth Street in the city, called the Stouffer Lunch, and incorporated the business as Stouffer Lunch System in 1924. As time went on, the couple continued the program of expansion with the assistance of their sons Vernon, a graduate of the Wharton School of Finance, and Gordon who, together, led the reorganization of the business, taking it public as the Stouffer Corporation in 1929 with Abraham as chairman of the board. The year 1929 also marked the beginning of the company's effort to establish locations outside of Ohio with the opening of a restaurant in Detroit, Michigan and one in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. After Abraham's death in 1936 the company continued its program of expansion by opening its first restaurant in New York City and eventually began a program of diversification, entering the frozen food business in 1946.. In 1960 the company, formally renamed Stouffer Foods Corporation in 1956, purchased its first hotel, the Anacapri Inn of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, and, by the end of that year, the company was composed of three divisions: Stouffer Foods Corporation, Stouffer Hotels Corporation, and Stouffer Restaurants Corporation. Stouffer's has a variety of different refrigerated product options for consumers, taking into account their different taste preferences and how many people they are eating with. They offer foods in both individual and family-size portions. A full list of Stouffers products can be found on the Products page of their website. Various organizations have rated Stouffer's products. Good Guide uses the categories of healthiness, environmental and social impact; Chicken Alfredo is Stouffer's most popular product with a 7.3 overall score: 10 points for healthiness, 6.3 for environmental impact, and 5.5 for social impact. The second place item, Stouffer's Beef Stew, gets an overall ranking of 5.9: 6.1 for healthiness, 6.3 for environmental impact, and 5.5 for social impact. Their lowest ranked product, Stouffers Pot Pie, Turkey White Meat, got an overall score of 4.5: 1.8 for healthiness (due to high saturated fat), 6.3 for environmental impact, and 5.5 for social impact. CalorieCount, rating entirely on calories, gives Stouffer's Chicken Alfredo a C- with 320 calories, 16g of fat, 4.5 of saturated fat, 30 mg of cholesterol, and 890 mg of sodium. Stouffer's Beef Stew receives a C with 280 calories, 9g of fat, 3.1g of saturated fat, 40 mg of cholesterol, and 1000 mg of sodium. Stouffer's Pot Pie, Turkey White Meat, receives a D with 570 calories, 31.9g of fat, 12g of saturated far, 55 mg of cholesterol, and 1170 mg of sodium. In 1991, the Federal Trade Commission issued a complaint that Stouffer Foods had misrepresented sodium content in their Lean Cuisine entrees by stating that they were low in sodium. Stouffers argued that the campaign had focused on good taste and controlled sodium, fat, and calories. They also argued that the sodium claim was relative, reflecting a lower amount of sodium, not necessarily that the entrees were low sodium. However, the Administrative Law Judge ruled in favor of the Federal Trade Commission. In 2003, Applebee’s sued Stouffer’s for trademark infringement of their marketing term “Skillet Sensations” back in 1997. Applebee's had a line of "Skillet Sensations" of their own and claimed that it caused confusion for customers that believed the Stouffer's line was linked to theirs. The U.S. Trademark Trial and Appeal Board ruled in favor of Applebee's. On March 14, 2011, a recall was placed on Lean Cuisine spaghetti and meatballs. Consumers reported finding pieces of plastic in their meals, and subsequently over 10,000 pounds of the product were recalled.
Chef America Inc. was the former manufacturer of the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets. Chef America is a former closely held corporation, which was formed in the late 1970s by two brothers, Paul and David Merage, of Colorado. Chef America introduced Hot Pockets in the early 1980s. Nestlé acquired the corporation in 2002 for the amount of $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets continued to be manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until 2013, when production moved to Solon, Ohio.
The Merage family is a wealthy Iranian Jewish family residing in Orange County, California. In 2004 the Merage Jewish Community Center opened in Irvine California; the center was named after the Merage Family and serves the needs of Orange County. David and Paul Merage co-founded Chef America Inc. where they created the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets, in the early 1980's. The brothers later sold the Chef America Inc. company to Nestlé for $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets were manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until moving its business to the rest of Nestlé's frozen business in Solon, Ohio.
Vahid Alaghband is a British-Iranian international commodities trader and entrepreneur based in London. He is founder and chairman of Mayfair-based Balli Group PLC. In 2008 the Sunday Times Rich List estimated his personal fortune at £125 million.][ He was educated in Switzerland and the USA, where he received his BS and MS degrees in Industrial Engineering and Operations Research at Cornell University He is a member of the Clinton Global Initiative, a trustee of Asia House London and an International Council Member of Asia Society New York. Vahid Alaghband is Chair of The Iran Heritage Foundation is a non-political UK registered charity with the mission to promote and preserve the history, languages and cultures of Iran and the Persian world. The objectives of the Foundation are pursued by organising, on a worldwide basis, diverse activities of cultural or scholarly merit. IHF programmes include academic research, publishing and fellowships at top universities such as Oxford, Cambridge, St Andrews, and Exeter and at museums in the United Kingdom and abroad. Most recently, the IHF launched its Institutional Partnership Programme with posts supported at the Universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, and St Andrews and at the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Freer and Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution. In 2009, Iran Heritage Foundation in association with the British Museum opens the 'Shah 'Abbas: the remaking of Iran' exhibition, Vahid Alaghband, Chairman of the Iranian Heritage Foundation and Group Chairman of Balli Group (http://www.balli.co.uk/ ), commented: "Shah 'Abbas was the most eminent ruler of the Safavid dynasty in Persia who, with his military successes and efficient administrative system, raised Iran to the status of a great power. When he died his dominions extended from the Tigris to the Indus. Through trade and diplomacy he fostered good relations with Europe and welcomed European diplomats in Iran, whilst ushering in a golden period for Persian art. He commissioned many beautiful works of art, grand architecture and restored major monuments across the country. Today, his legacy lives on, in the magnificent buildings of Isfahan and through his opulent gifts found in many Iranian holy shrines.
John Darius Bikoff (born in 21 September 1961 in New York) is an American entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Energy Brands. He was born to an American father and an Iranian mother. In 2007, Bikoff sold Energy Brands to The Coca-Cola Company for $4.1 billion dollars. This deal earned Bikoff personally $325 million dollars.

The Merage family /məˈrɑː/ is a wealthy Iranian Jewish family residing in Orange County, California. In 2004 the Merage Jewish Community Center opened in Irvine California; the center was named after the Merage Family and serves the needs of Orange County.

David and Paul Merage co-founded Chef America Inc. where they created the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets, in the early 1980's. The brothers later sold the Chef America Inc. company to Nestlé for $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets were manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until moving its business to the rest of Nestlé's frozen business in Solon, Ohio.

The Merage family /məˈrɑː/ is a wealthy Iranian Jewish family residing in Orange County, California. In 2004 the Merage Jewish Community Center opened in Irvine California; the center was named after the Merage Family and serves the needs of Orange County.

David and Paul Merage co-founded Chef America Inc. where they created the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets, in the early 1980's. The brothers later sold the Chef America Inc. company to Nestlé for $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets were manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until moving its business to the rest of Nestlé's frozen business in Solon, Ohio.

Chef America Inc. was the former manufacturer of the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets. Chef America is a former closely held corporation, which was formed in the late 1970s by two brothers, Paul and David Merage, of Colorado. Chef America introduced Hot Pockets in the early 1980s. Nestlé acquired the corporation in 2002 for the amount of $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets continued to be manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until 2013, when production moved to Solon, Ohio.


Pocket

Hot Pockets are microwaveable turnovers generally containing one or more types of cheese, meat, or vegetables. Hot Pockets were founded by the Chef America Inc. company. Since 2002 they have been produced by Nestlé.

There are more than 20 varieties of the traditional Hot Pocket, including breakfast, lunch, and dinner varieties. Nestlé also offers Lean Pockets, Hot Pockets Croissant Crust (formerly called Croissant Pockets), hot Pie Express, Hot Pocket Pizza Minis (originally called Hot Pockets Pizza Snacks), Hot Pockets Subs, Hot Pockets Calzones, Hot Pockets Panini, Hot Pockets Sideshots, and Hot Pockets Breakfast items which include the meat, egg and cheese varieties, and fruit pastries.

Chef America Inc. was the former manufacturer of the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets. Chef America is a former closely held corporation, which was formed in the late 1970s by two brothers, Paul and David Merage, of Colorado. Chef America introduced Hot Pockets in the early 1980s. Nestlé acquired the corporation in 2002 for the amount of $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets continued to be manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until 2013, when production moved to Solon, Ohio.


The Merage family /məˈrɑː/ is a wealthy Iranian Jewish family residing in Orange County, California. In 2004 the Merage Jewish Community Center opened in Irvine California; the center was named after the Merage Family and serves the needs of Orange County.

David and Paul Merage co-founded Chef America Inc. where they created the popular microwavable snack, Hot Pockets, in the early 1980's. The brothers later sold the Chef America Inc. company to Nestlé for $2.6 billion. Hot Pockets were manufactured in Englewood, Colorado, Chef America's former headquarters, until moving its business to the rest of Nestlé's frozen business in Solon, Ohio.

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