Question:

When was the first search engine created?

Answer:

The first search engine created was Archie in 1990 by Alan Emtage, a student at McGill University in Montreal. Cha- on!

More Info:

Alan Emtage (born November 27, 1964) conceived and implemented the first version of Archie, a pre-Web internet search engine for locating material in public FTP archives.

Alan Emtage was born in Barbados, the son of Sir Stephen and Lady Emtage. He attended high school at Harrison College from 1975 to 1983 (and in 1981 became the owner of a Sinclair ZX81 with 1K of memory), where he graduated at the top of his class, winning the Barbados Scholarship.

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Barbadians or Bajans are people originating on the Caribbean island of Barbados whether they live there or in the Barbadian diaspora.

Internet Computing
Education in Quebec

The Quebec education system is governed by the Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports (Ministère de l'Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport). It is administered at the local level by publicly elected French and English school boards. Teachers are represented by province-wide unions that negotiate province-wide working conditions with local boards and the provincial government.


Web search engine

A web search engine is a software system that is designed to search for information on the World Wide Web. The search results are generally presented in a line of results often referred to as search engine results pages (SERPs). The information may be a specialist in web pages, images, information and other types of files. Some search engines also mine data available in databases or open directories. Unlike web directories, which are maintained only by human editors, search engines also maintain real-time information by running an algorithm on a web crawler.


McGill University

McGill University is a public research university located in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Founded in 1821 during the British colonial era, the university bears the name of James McGill, a prominent Montreal merchant from Glasgow, Scotland and alumnus of Glasgow University, whose bequest formed the beginning of the university. With 21 faculties and professional schools, McGill offers degrees and diplomas in over 300 fields of study, including cultural studies, medicine and law.

McGill University has almost 215,000 living alumni worldwide. Notable alumni include nine Nobel Laureates (overall, twelve Nobel laureates are affiliated with the university), one hundred and thirty-four Rhodes Scholars (more than any other Canadian university), three astronauts, two Canadian prime ministers, twelve justices of the Canadian Supreme Court, four foreign leaders, twenty-eight foreign ambassadors, nine Academy Award winners, three Pulitzer Prize winners, and twenty-eight Olympic medalists. McGill alumni were instrumental in inventing or initially organizing football, basketball, and ice hockey. McGill is one of two member-universities of the Association of American Universities situated outside the United States.

The School of Computer Science (SOCS) is a department in the Faculty of Science at McGill University in Montreal. The school is the second most funded computer science department in Canada. It currently has 34 faculty members, 60 Ph.D. students and 100 Masters students.

The first graduate student in the computing field at McGill University was Gerald Ratzer. He came from Cambridge, England in September 1964, and was registered for a M. Sc. in the Faculty of Graduate Sciences. He was attached to the McGill Computing Centre, and his supervisor was David Thorpe, who was the Director of the Computing Centre. The creation of a Computer Science organization was led by the Dean of Engineering George Lee (John) d'Ombrain, who wished to see computers used for assisted learning in classrooms, as well as data systems in hospitals. He is also credited with bringing the first computer to McGill University. However, there were some detractors from the idea to create a Computer Science school. One mathematician is alleged to have said, "When radios came along, we did not start a School of Radio Science! Computers are just another application of Electrical Engineering!"]citation needed[ The School of Computer Science was formally created in 1969.

Archie

Archie is a tool for indexing FTP archives, allowing people to find specific files. It is considered to be the first Internet search engine. The original implementation was written in 1990 by Alan Emtage and J. Peter Deutsch, then postgraduate students at McGill University in Montreal and Bill Heelan, who studied at Concordia University in Montreal and worked at McGill University at the same time.

The archie service began as a project for students and volunteer staff at the McGill University School of Computer Science in 1987, when Deutsch, Emtage, and Heelan were asked to connect the School of Computer Science to the Internet. The earliest versions of archie, written by Alan Emtage, simply contacted a list of FTP archives on a regular basis (contacting each roughly once a month, so as not to waste too much resources of the remote servers) and requested a listing. These listings were stored in local files to be searched using the Unix grep command.

McGill
Technology Internet

The Internet is a global system of interconnected computer networks that use the standard Internet protocol suite (TCP/IP) to serve several billion users worldwide. It is a network of networks that consists of millions of private, public, academic, business, and government networks, of local to global scope, that are linked by a broad array of electronic, wireless and optical networking technologies. The Internet carries an extensive range of information resources and services, such as the inter-linked hypertext documents of the World Wide Web (WWW), the infrastructure to support email, and peer-to-peer networks.

Most traditional communications media including telephone, music, film, and television are being reshaped or redefined by the Internet, giving birth to new services such as voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and Internet Protocol television (IPTV). Newspaper, book and other print publishing are adapting to website technology, or are reshaped into blogging and web feeds. The Internet has enabled and accelerated new forms of human interactions through instant messaging, Internet forums, and social networking. Online shopping has boomed both for major retail outlets and small artisans and traders. Business-to-business and financial services on the Internet affect supply chains across entire industries.

Education
search engine

A web search engine is a software system that is designed to search for information on the World Wide Web. The search results are generally presented in a line of results often referred to as search engine results pages (SERPs). The information may be a specialist in web pages, images, information and other types of files. Some search engines also mine data available in databases or open directories. Unlike web directories, which are maintained only by human editors, search engines also maintain real-time information by running an algorithm on a web crawler.

Montreal McGill University in Montreal

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