Question:

When Going at about 55 or 60 miles an hour ..how long does it take to go 45 miles?

Answer:

It would take 45 minutes to travel 45 miles going 60 mph and 40 minutes to travel 45 miles going 55 mph.

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Measurement

United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States. The U.S. customary system developed from English units which were in use in the British Empire before American independence. Consequently most U.S. units are virtually identical to the British imperial units. However, the British system was overhauled in 1824, changing the definitions of some units used there, so several differences exist between the two systems.

The majority of U.S. customary units were redefined in terms of the meter and the kilogram with the Mendenhall Order of 1893, and in practice, for many years before. These definitions were refined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959. The U.S. primarily uses customary units in its commercial activities, while science, medicine, government, and many sectors of industry use metric units. The International System of Units (SI), the modern form of the metric system, is preferred for many uses by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).


The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement; however some Imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Mile Surveying

Speed limits in the United States are set by each state or territory. Speed limits are always posted in increments of five miles per hour. Some states have lower limits for trucks and at night, and occasionally there are minimum speed limits. Most speed limits are set by state or local statute, although each state allows various agencies to set a different, generally lower, limit.

The highest speed limits are generally 75 mph (121 km/h) in western states and 70 mph (113 km/h) in eastern states. A few states, mainly in the Northeast Megalopolis, have 65 mph (105 km/h) limits, and Hawaii only has 60 mph (97 km/h) maximum limits. A small portion of the Texas and Utah road networks have higher limits. For 13 years (1974–1987), federal law prohibited speed limits above 55 mph (89 km/h).

Speed limits in the United States are set by each state or territory. Speed limits are always posted in increments of five miles per hour. Some states have lower limits for trucks and at night, and occasionally there are minimum speed limits. Most speed limits are set by state or local statute, although each state allows various agencies to set a different, generally lower, limit.

The highest speed limits are generally 75 mph (121 km/h) in western states and 70 mph (113 km/h) in eastern states. A few states, mainly in the Northeast Megalopolis, have 65 mph (105 km/h) limits, and Hawaii only has 60 mph (97 km/h) maximum limits. A small portion of the Texas and Utah road networks have higher limits. For 13 years (1974–1987), federal law prohibited speed limits above 55 mph (89 km/h).

Hospitality is the relationship between the guest and the host, or the act or practice of being hospitable. This includes the reception and entertainment of guests, visitors, or strangers.

A disaster is a natural or man-made (or technological) hazard resulting in an event of substantial extent causing significant physical damage or destruction, loss of life, or drastic change to the environment. A disaster can be ostensively defined as any tragic event stemming from events such as earthquakes, floods, catastrophic accidents, fires, or explosions. It is a phenomenon that can cause damage to life and property and destroy the economic, social and cultural life of people.

In contemporary academia, disasters are seen as the consequence of inappropriately managed risk. These risks are the product of a combination of both hazard/s and vulnerability. Hazards that strike in areas with low vulnerability will never become disasters, as is the case in uninhabited regions.

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