Question:

When does wrestling season start in Palmdale High School located in Palmdale, California?

Answer:

The date of Wrestling tryouts have not been released, but usually the tryouts take place in October for Freshman.

More Info:

Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW) is an independent wrestling promotion. In 1999, John Zandig and five of his students, Ric Blade, T.C.K, Lobo, Nick Gage, and Justice Pain (along with sub-trainer Jon Dahmer) began to run professional wrestling shows in New Jersey and Delaware, showcasing a brand of hardcore wrestling dubbed as "ultraviolence". Ladders, tables, thumbtacks, barbed wire, light tubes and fire are common elements of "ultraviolent" wrestling matches in CZW. The company filled a niche for hardcore wrestling fans that had been left open by the folding of Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW). CZW established themselves as the leading American hardcore wrestling promotion at the ECW Arena with their Cage of Death 3 show in 2001, the year ECW folded. Their homegrown roster helped establish what became a top independent promotion in later years. Although they are most commonly known for their 'ultraviolent' style, their shows feature almost every other styles of wrestling as well. Just about any card will feature high flying, comedy, strong style, chain and technical wrestling. Their annual Tournament of Death show emphasizes the ultraviolent style of CZW, while their annual Best of the Best emphasizes on the technical and aerial style. All of their shows are taped and distributed by Pancoast Productions, Inc., who releases the shows on DVD and Pay-Per-Stream via their website. CZW was broadcast on TWC Fight! to viewers in the UK and Republic of Ireland as part of the "Bloodbath" program until TWC Fight! closed in 2008. CZW continues to run on a monthly basis in The Arena, and they also run shows outside of Philadelphia. The Combat Zone Wrestling's Pro Wrestling Academy was founded in New Jersey by John Zandig in 1998. After training the classes alone, Zandig enlisted the help of Jon Dahmer, who helped train with Zandig for the next three classes. The first student trained was Lobo, who worked with Zandig before their wrestling careers. Nick Gage and Justice Pain were the next two students to be trained by Zandig, and it was only in the forthcoming years that they were unveiled as brothers, Justice Pain being the older of the two. The fourth student and fifth student trained was TCK and Ric Blade, who already had a background in martial arts. The academy then relocated to The Arena in Philadelphia, PA. and briefly merged with the Chikara Wrestle Factory. Shortly after the second class, the Academy separated from the Chikara Wrestle factory and moved its operation back to New Jersey. Not long after moving back to Jersey, head trainers D.J. Hyde and Jon Dahmer moved the school back to Philadelphia. Currently, Drew Gulak & Sami Callihan join D.J. Hyde as head trainers of the academy, with members of the CZW locker room joining them every session. The school is still active as of today with free tryouts. Early 2000 saw CZW establish a connection with the death match wrestling orientated company Big Japan Pro Wrestling, credited to have popularized the death match wrestling style that CZW continued to emphasize in the United States, though, dubbed as "Ultraviolence." Both promotions traded talent throughout 2000 and 2001, the company vs company feud was primarily based in Japan. The "CZW warriors" in BJW included Wifebeater, Nick Gage, Trent Acid, Justice Pain, Johnny Kashmere, Nate Hatred, Ruckus, Nick Berk, as well as John Zandig as the leader. Notable incidents included Zandig turning face in Japan and Jun Kasai joining Zandig as part of his Big Dealz stable in CZW. Kasai competed in a match which was later dubbed "Un F'N Believable," in reference to the shows name. During the match, Kasai was crucifix bombed over the top rope into lightubes, barbed wire and tables, causing Kasai's elbow bone to pop out of his skin, he continued the match after having his elbow taped up. During 2001 in Japan, the Wifebeater and Ryuji Yamakawa faced off in a match which ended Yamakawa's career after the Wifebeater chokensteined him off the ring apron through a table set up on the outside. In a 'shoot interview' Wifebeater stated communication difficulties between the two was a major factor which led to the incident. Wifebeater pleaded that they should not execute the maneuver, though the move went on and saw Yamakawa's head slam against the concrete. Both wrestlers have stated that it was half of each other's fault when Yamakawa did not take the move as it should be performed; back first, though some even blame the Japanese tables, which are smaller, more sturdy and harder to break, the table in this incident did not break and simply slipped from underneath of Yamakawa thus only connecting with his legs, causing his head to take the impact on the concrete. The reason for the collapse of the inter-promotional deal is uncertain. After a controversial exploding panes of glass match, between Zandig and Mitsuhiro Matsunaga in Japan, 2001, Zandig left BJW with the BJW death match title belt. Many wrestlers of both promotions at the time were confused about the collapse between the two. In February 2000, the company would relocate from their home arena in Mantua, New Jersey to Champs Soccer Arena, in Sewell, New Jersey. They would remain their for 2 years until the state of New Jersey banned the use of ultraviolent weapons (such as glass, barbed wire, & fire) in wrestling. To counteract the ban, CZW branched out from New Jersey to Delaware, where they would host their more ultraviolent shows throughout the rest of the company's existence. A Pay-Per-View taping for the June 25, 2000 show, was put in place. The event was scheduled to be main evented by Terry Funk and Atsushi Onita in an explosion match. The deal fell through when Onita canceled. Although the show took place and was main evented by Nick Gage and the Wifebeater in the first ever 200 lightubes match in the United States, the show was later called 'They Said it Couldn't be Done'. On June 8, 2001, the company secured a TV taping for the show 'Take 1.' During the main event as part of a dual 20 ft balcony dive, Ric Blade suffered a broken leg after landing on Justice Pain, who laid upon two stacked tables, Nick Gage was to attempt the second dive with Lobo a few meters away, unfortunately Nick Gage slipped and fell from atop the balcony to the ground; fortunately Gage was able to continue, unlike Blade who had to be stretchered out. The spot was cut from TV. The TV tapings aired on WGTW-48, as a part of CZW's very own show Fake You TV, which was available in many northeastern states in the US. After many business changes by the WGTW-48 production team over the years, including a time slot change from Saturdays at 9.00PM to a weeknight at midnight slot, to compete with other promotions, this idea was a failure and Fake You TV continued to strive. CZW continued to endure every business decision that WGTW-48 formulated and executed until the channel decided not to air the June 18, 2004 episode due to its content, through negative affects on the fans and after much consideration, CZW decided to withdraw the show indefinitely. Due to their upcoming annual Cage Of Death 3 (COD) show at the end of 2001, the company needed a bigger venue and made their debut in the ECW Arena, formerly Viking Hall and currently The Arena. The venue was the first sellout in the building since the era of ECW, and hundreds were turned away from the biggest show in the promotions history. Several promotions competed for the Northeast fan base that had been left behind by ECW in what became known as the 'Indy Wars." CZW, XPW, and 3PW were the key promotions which revolved around Viking Hall. XPW were given the lease to the arena in very late 2002 after Rob Black offered around $60,000. On December 12, 2002, as part of a triple header of wrestling in Philadelphia Ring of Honor ran shows in conjunction with CZW and 3PW in what was to be the latter two promotions last events in the arena. During CZW's event, Zandig publicly stated that they had offered $32,000 to stay in the arena, but also stating that with the $10,000 a month XPW would need to pay for the building, the lease would not last long. Accompanied by incidents relating to Extreme Associates, XPW later folded in 2003. CZW made their return to the arena on March 8, 2003. Shortly after their return to the arena, on May 10, 2003, the company promoted a show entitled "Then & Now: A Decade of Defiance." The event was a tribute to the last ten years of wrestling in the New Alhambra Arena, or at the time; Viking Hall. On October 25, 2003, the promotion made their debut in Italy with an attendance record of 2,000 people filled the Palasport Arena in Pistoia, later on March 27, 2004, the company returned for another event which featured Sabu in a tables match this time only drawing 500 people in Parma. On June 14, 2003, mid-south based promotion Independent Wrestling Association Mid-South (IWA-MS) invaded CZW as part of a kayfabe angle which led to an inter-promotional feud throughout most of 2003. During the night of the initial invasion, the crowd was so riled up that they began hurling chairs into the ring at Ian Rotten, Corporal Robinson, and J.C. Bailey of IWA-MS. The Delaware wrestling commissioner, who was in the ring at the time, was struck in the side of the head. The feud was based in both promotions and a major part led into CZW's Tournament of Death 2, five IWA-MS wrestlers and three CZW wrestlers entered into the 8-man single elimination tournament. The semi-final saw two CZW wrestlers John Zandig and Nick Mondo compete in a 2 out of 3 lightube log cabin match, a match which is said to have ended Nick Mondo's career (However, In Mondo's shoot interview he stated that T.O.D 2 was going to be his last appearance anyway). Towards the end of the match Zandig Mother F'N Bombed Nick Mondo off a 40 ft rooftop as both Zandig and Mondo crashed into tables and a lightube log cabin contraption. He continued the Tournament with 3 broken bones in his wrist and won the tournament after defeating Ian Rotten in a 200 lightubes final. During John Zandig's feud with heel stable the Hi-5, Zandig was suspended in the middle of the ring by meat hooks from the roof of the arena. The incident led into the setup of the main event at Cage of Death 2003, where a cage was suspended from the roof, the event was called 'Cage of Death 5: Suspended'. The company remained successful that year and had a sold out crowd for their annual Cage of Death show. During 2005, CZW established a connection with local promotion Chikara, which established into a joint training school known as 'The Wrestle Factory' in the New Alhambra Arena, with head trainers Chris Hero and Mike Quackenbush. During 2007, CZW departed from the training school to form their own, much like their older school. The company remained strong in the forthcoming years with new booker, Mike Burns, who was responsible for one of the best runs in the promotion's history, especially in 2005. Pancoast Productions, a company which for many years was responsible for a lot of the company's media logo and Titan Tron work, among other things, briefly departed from the company in late 2005 after an altercation between Pancoast Productions owner Mike Pancoast and John Zandig. At their Cage of Death 7 show at the end of 2005, former CZW Ironman Champion Chris Hero cut a promo challenging American Dragon Bryan Danielson to a match at the next show, backstage, Zandig was furious. Zandig did not know about the deal that CZW booker, Mike Burns arranged with Ring of Honor (ROH) Booker, Gabe Sapolsky. The news of CZW working with ROH made Zandig go into a frenzy. Zandig was approached backstage by Mike Pancoast, Zandig told him not to raise his voice at him, after a very vocal argument Zandig pushed him down a flight of stairs, one worker quoted Zandig saying, "Make sure to grab the rail on your way down." Zandig was mad at Mike Burns for setting up a deal with ROH, without telling him first, this led to the departure of Burns, it is not known if Burns quit CZW or was relieved of his duties by Zandig. Pancoast Productions currently films CZW's shows but has a distribution deal with Smart Mark Video. Wrestler D.J. purchased CZW from Zandig in 2009. The first show booked by DJ Hyde was Tangled Web 2. Since then, CZW has held its first shows in Germany, Massachusetts, Ohio, South Carolina and Indiana. They also returned to Japan and has brought back previous stars like Homicide, The Briscoe Brothers, Derek Frazier, and BJ Whitmer. In January 2012, CZW & ECW's world famous arena was sold and since then has been closed down. The closing of the New Alhambra Arena forced CZW to look for a new home. CZW would host a number of shows in different locations before finally settling in their home state of New Jersey. CZW now runs monthly shows at Flyers Skate Zone in Voorhees, New Jersey. The Maven Bentley Association (MBA) is Combat Zone Wrestling's sister company run by Maven Bentley. The MBA LLC is the sole owner of the Maven Bentley character. It provides promoter services to independent wrestling companies as well as the character Maven Bentley for acting and other entertainment endeavors. As well half of the roster are mainly from CZW. The MBA LLC has provided services for some of the top names in the wrestling business such as Ring of Honor (ROH), World Xtreme Wrestling (WXW), World Sumo League (WSL), and Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA). In 2007 saw CZW had short lived feud with the MBA, who's been running amok in CZW for the past few months with the power mad Bentley abusing his authority. Maven Bentley "hired" a few of CZW's own wrestlers to help him take over the company. Those wrestlers included Diehard Dustin Lee, Scotty Vortekz, Brain Damage, & DJ Hyde. Bentley himself as he was scheduled to face Lobo in a lumberjack strap match, which he yet lost at Cage of Death 9. The MBA had returned to the CZW Arena for its "Economic Crisis" event on January 31, 2009. The Wrestler is a 2008 movie based around a fictional, once-prominent pro-wrestler (played by Mickey Rourke) in the heights of the 1980s, now left to drive from town to town for cheap pickup bouts and the rigorous dangers of leagues like CZW. On December 8, 2007, Scott Franklin, Darren Aronofsky and Mickey Rourke visited CZW's Cage of Death IX in December and committed to the venue. On February 9, 2008, as a part of CZW's regular February event, filming took place in the New Alhambra Arena for the upcoming movie which included many CZW alumni, along with the Necro Butcher, who wrestles Rourke's character "Randy 'The Ram' Robinson" in an ultraviolent hardcore match. Zandig's hope was that The Wrestler, along with CZW's first worldwide distribution deal for its DVDs (through LocoMotion Films) will take the ultra-violent sport to the next level. CZW was featured on G4's TV Show G4 Underground . It shows Danny Havoc getting ready for his match at Total Havoc against Thumbtack Jack in which he did win. CZW's appearance on the Discovery Channel's Time Warp program debuted April 22, 2009 as part of a special 60-minute episode. The program included footage of Combat Zone's top stars Zandig, and Nick Gage at the Discovery Channel studios in Boston. Combat Zone Wrestling's biggest show is the year-end Cage of Death. It always features the "Cage of Death" match, a steel cage with various weapons and objects. Electrified cage walls, cacti, tables, light tubes, glass, thumbtacks, baseball bats, and barbed-wire have been used in it. Matches always include high risk wrestling bumps. The Cage of Death also has different formats and stipulations: singles, tag team, or gauntlet. Combat Zone Wrestling 's yearly death-match tournament features the use of fire, weed whackers, light tubes, and other weapons. Previous winners include Wifebeater (TOD 1 and 3), Nick Mondo (TOD 2), Necro Butcher (TOD 4), Nick Gage (TOD 5 & TOD vs. Gorefest), Drake Younger (TOD 6), Brain Damage (TOD: FF), Danny Havoc (TOD 7), and John Zandig who gave the trophy over to Thumbtack Jack who lost the Tournament of Death trophy at Best of the Best to DJ Hyde (TOD 8). Due to the incidents at TOD 8 another Event named TOD 8.5 Rewind took place in the same year which was won by Thumbtack Jack. Scotty Vortekz won TOD 9. Masada won TOD X, XI and TOD: Europe. Combat Zone Wrestling's yearly tournament that differs from other CZW events in how it emphasizes athleticism more than the use of weapons. The Best of the Best tournament is, by design, a Junior Heavyweight Tournament. In 2005, however, the tournament was formatted as an open weight tournament. The next year, it returned to its original format. Previous winners include Winger, Trent Acid, B-Boy, Sonjay Dutt, Mike Quackenbush, Ruckus, Joker, Sabian, Egotistico Fantastico, Adam Cole and Sami Callihan in that order. The first show featured a bloody barbed wire match between Zandig and Lobo. Since then the Deja Vu card has been held on an almost yearly basis. As of 2005 Combat Zone Wrestling annually run a memorial tribute event to Christopher "Chri$ Ca$h" Bauman title "Down with the Sickness" after Chri$ Ca$h's theme song from the band Disturbed. The show originally started as a double header afternoon show, with another CZW event taking place later in the evening. Many former CZW trainees have made appearances on past events, including longtime friend GQ, who has wrestled on all of the events. Every year since 2008, CZW has held this event in which a barbed-wire "spiderweb" is used. Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW) is a professional wrestling promotion based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Employees in CZW consist of professional wrestlers (the ring name of the employees are written to the left, while the employee's real name is written to the right; employees without an alias, will only have their real name appearing), managers, play-by-play and color commentators, announcers, interviewers, referees, trainers, script writers and various other positions. Executives and board of directors are also listed. This list is organized alphabetically by the wrestlers' real last names. This is a list of professional wrestlers who are Combat Zone Wrestling employees, and a list of former employees of the professional wrestling promotion Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW). In the early days of the company, talent often only appeared a couple of times before disappearing, or wrestlers accepted bookings with other companies, resulting in extended absences from CZW.
Palmdale is a city located in the center of northern Los Angeles County, California, United States. Palmdale was the first community within the Antelope Valley to incorporate as a city on August 24, 1962; 47 years later, in November 2009, voters approved creating a charter city. Palmdale is separated from Los Angeles by the San Gabriel Mountain range. Palmdale's population was 152,750 at the 2010 census, up from 116,670 as of the 2000 census. Palmdale is the 32nd most populous city in California and ranks 158th nationally. According to the Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance report of 2009 the Palmdale / Lancaster, CA Urbanized Area (a US Census Bureau defined term) has a population of 483,998. Over the last 25 years this city has consistently been ranked in the top 25 fastest growing cities in the United States (based on percentage change). As of the 2010 census, the population was 152,750, sixth largest, and fastest growing city in Los Angeles County. With 106 square miles (275 km2) of land in its incorporated boundaries, the city is the second largest city in Los Angeles County, 6th largest in California, and in the top 100 largest cities in the United States in geographic area. Palmdale is also one of the largest cities in the United States that is not currently served by either an Interstate Freeway or a U.S. Highway. Sierra Highway was at one time labeled as U.S. Highway 6 until the State of California truncated it at Bishop. The city is known as a family-oriented community with a high quality of life. Palmdale Regional Medical Center, a first class medical facility opened in 2010, includes an emergency department, a helipad, medical office towers, and a senior housing complex. A new multimodal transportation center, serving local and commuter bus and train services, opened in 2005. A voter-initiated and approved tax has funded major park and recreation expansions, including the Palmdale Amphitheater (capacity 10,000), two new pools, other recreation buildings, satellite library and Dry Town Water Park. Downtown revitalization includes hundreds of new senior housing units, a new senior center, and expanded open space. A new 48,000 sq ft (4,500 m2). Sheriff station opened in July 2006, the largest in Los Angeles County. Two additional fire stations have been built, one on the east side and one on the west side. While Palmdale is still a part of Los Angeles County, the urbanized centers of Palmdale and Los Angeles are separated by the San Gabriel mountain range, which is about 40 miles (64 km) wide. This range forms the southern edge of the Antelope Valley portion of the Mojave Desert. Palmdale is the second largest city in the Antelope Valley, and the fifty largest city overall in the Mojave Desert by population, outstripped only by Las Vegas, Henderson, North Las Vegas and Lancaster. Palmenthal, the first European settlement within the limits of Palmdale, was established as a village on April 20, 1886 by westward Lutheran travelers from the American Midwest, mostly of German and Swiss descent. According to area folklore, the travelers had been told they would know they were close to the ocean when they saw palm trees. Never actually having seen palm trees before, they mistook the local Joshua trees for palms and so named their settlement after them. (Palmenthal is German for Palms Valley.) According to David L. Durham Joshua trees were sometimes called yucca palms at the time, which was the reason for the name. The village was officially established upon the arrival of a post office on June 17, 1888. By the 1890s (soon after the last of the indigenous antelopes, which the valley was named after, had died) farming families continued to migrate to Palmenthal and nearby Harold to grow grain and fruit. However, most of these settlers were unfamiliar with farming in a desert climate, so when the drought years occurred, most abandoned their settlement. By 1899, only one family was left in the original village. The rest of the settlers, including the post office, moved closer to the Southern Pacific railroad tracks. This new community was renamed Palmdale and was located where the present day civic center is. A railroad station was built along the tracks there. This railroad was operated by Southern Pacific and traveled between Los Angeles and San Francisco. The Wells Fargo stagecoach line that ran between San Francisco and New Orleans stopped there as well. The only remaining pieces of evidence of the original settlements of Palmenthal and Harold are the old Palmdale Pioneer cemetery located on the northeast corner of Avenue S and 20th Street East, recently acquired and restored by the city as part of a future historical park, and the old schoolhouse now relocated to McAdam Park. As the population of Palmdale began to increase after relocation, water became scarce, until November 5, 1913 when the California – Los Angeles Aqueduct system was completed finally by William Mulholland, bringing water from the Owens Valley into Los Angeles County. During this period, crops of apples, pears and alfalfa became plentiful. In 1915, Palmdale’s first newspaper, the Palmdale Post, was published. Today it is called the Antelope Valley Press. In 1921, the first major link between Palmdale and Los Angeles was completed, Mint Canyon/Lancaster Road, later designated U.S. Route 6. Completion of this road caused the local agricultural industry to flourish and was the first major step towards defining the metropolis that exists today. Presently this road is known as Sierra Highway. In 1924, the Littlerock Dam and the Harold Reservoir, present day Lake Palmdale, were constructed to assist the agricultural industry and have enough water to serve the growing communities. Agriculture continued to be the foremost industry for Palmdale and its northern neighbor Lancaster until the outbreak of World War II. In 1933, the United States government established Muroc Air Base (from an original founder name, Effie Corum, spelled backwards) six miles (10 km) north of Lancaster in Kern County, now known as Edwards Air Force Base. They also bought Palmdale Airport in 1952 and established an aerospace development and testing facility called United States Air Force Plant 42. One year later, in 1953, Lockheed established a facility at the airport. After this point in time, the aerospace industry took over as the primary local source of employment, where it has remained ever since. Today the city is even referred to as the “Aerospace Capital of America” because of its rich heritage in being the home of many of the aircraft used in the United States military. In 1957, Palmdale’s first high school, Palmdale High School, was established, making it easier for youths to not have to travel to Antelope Valley High School in nearby Lancaster. In August 1962, the township of Palmdale officially became the city of Palmdale with the incorporation of 2 square miles (5 km2) of land around the present day civic center. In 1964, the Antelope Valley Freeway, or State Highway 14, was completed as a link between Palmdale and Los Angeles. The freeway at this time ran all the way to present day Technology Drive. It was at this time that talk about the future Palmdale Intercontinental Airport was seen as the way of the future. By 1965 the new city had annexed an additional 20 square miles (52 km2) of land and industry was thriving. Talk of the future commercial airport had many investors buying up large quantities of land. In 1970, the city of Los Angeles went forward with buying 17,750 acres (71.8 km2) of land east of the city for its proposed intercontinental commercial airport. However, the United States Air Force desired to put a hold on the construction of this new facility until the existing airport reached its commercial capacity. So under a joint use agreement with the military, the Los Angeles Department of Airports, now called Los Angeles World Airports, built a 9,000 square foot (800 m²) terminal on leased land that opened in 1971, creating present day LA/Palmdale Regional Airport which the City of Palmdale has taken control of in an effort to establish reliable air service in the region. By 1974, the Antelope Valley Freeway construction ended at the southern border of Mojave in Kern County. In 1977, Palmdale built its first municipal building, the Palmdale City Library. This was the same year that its northern neighbor Lancaster incorporated itself into a city. Since the 1920s, Lancaster had been the much larger and principal community of the Antelope Valley, as well as the rest of California's Mojave Desert. The 1980s and 1990s were the decades that really started to define the two Antelope Valley cities. Affordable housing in the area caused a dramatic spike in the population. The city became a bedroom community for those employed in Los Angeles. Palmdale's population continued to approach Lancaster's. Throughout the eighties and even the nineties, Palmdale was the fastest growing city in California and second fastest growing city in the nation. In 1980, Palmdale's population was 12,227. By 1990, it had soared to 68,842. During that same year the Antelope Valley Mall opened at Avenue P (present day Rancho Vista Blvd.) and 10th Street West, presently the busiest intersection in the entire Mojave Desert. In 1991, the Palmdale Auto Center complex opened. Throughout the 1990s and early first decade of the 21st century, central Palmdale has become the retail and commercial center of the California High Desert. In 2000, the city's population was 116,670. With over 150,000 residents today, the City Planning Commission continues to attempt a form of managed growth in the early part of 21st century. The recent subprime mortgage crisis has affected the city with a tremendous number of foreclosures, much like other cities in California. However, even with the high number of foreclosures, the city remains the fastest growing city in Los Angeles County, and the fastest growing large city in the State of California. Palmdale has three separate elementary school districts and one high school district: Palmdale is a Charter City governed under the council / manager form of local government. The mayor is elected every two years for a two-year term. Also every two years, two of the four council members are elected to serve four-year terms. Palmdale does not have term limits for council and mayor. The current mayor, James C. Ledford, is serving his tenth term in office. The City Council appoints the City Manager and City Attorney. The city also has an appointed Planning Commission divided into four separate districts. The Planning Commission was organized to help with the planning, zoning, and development of various city areas in different districts and to give the residents of those particular districts a greater voice in local land use decisions. There is also an appointed Board of Library Trustees, and Youth Council. On November 3, 2009, local residents voted in favor of a measure to change Palmdale's general law city status to that of a Charter City. This allowed Palmdale to draft a city charter and constitution, enabling it to make more decisions at the local level without interference or rules from the state government. The city provides a number of municipal services, including a Planning Department, Economic Development Department and Redevelopment Agency, Building and Safety Department, Public Works Department, Parks and Recreation Department, and Library Department. The city also operates the Palmdale Transportation Center which serves as the hub for public transit services including Metrolink trains, Antelope Valley Transit Authority, Amtrak California's Thruway Motorcoach and Greyhound. Palmdale was selected as a stop for the California High Speed Rail System, currently undergoing environmental review, that will link Northern and Southern California. City officials have formed the Palmdale Airport Authority, as they pursue regional air service from a joint use facility at USAF Plant 42. Recreation and cultural services include the Palmdale City Library, Legacy Commons, Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Palmdale Playhouse and Art Gallery, Dry Town Water Park, Palmdale Amphitheater, Best of the West Softball Complex, Hammack Activity Center, Palmdale Oasis Park Recreation Center, Marie Kerr Park Recreation Center, Joe Davies Heritage Airpark at Palmdale Plant 42, and four swimming pools. The city is policed by the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department under a formal contract with the County of Los Angeles and has its municipal judicial system intertwined with the Los Angeles County Superior Court.][ The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department (LASD) operates the Palmdale Station in Palmdale. Palmdale has the largest Sheriff's Station in Los Angeles County. Palmdale's innovative Partners Against Crime (PAC) Program, a cooperative effort between law enforcement, landlords and community members, has successfully focused on quality of life issues and crime suppression, reducing the crime rate annually. Recently, the Partners for a Better Palmdale program was initiated by the City Council, to further engage residents, schools, community groups and law enforcement in improving community quality of life. The city pioneered the use of municipal Community Service Officers for low level incidents to free up Deputies for higher priority matters, and employ high-tech tools, such as Automated License Plate Recognition Systems on patrol cars, to increase officer productivity.][ The city is served by the Los Angeles County Fire Department for its fire and paramedic services through the Consolidated Fire Protection District. Palmdale downtown Station #37 is one of the busiest fire stations in the United States. Two new fire stations went into service in late 2008 on the east and west sides of Palmdale.][ Utility services within the city are provided by several public and private agencies. Water service is primarily provided by Palmdale Water District (separate public agency) and Los Angeles County Waterworks (part of the County Public Works); sewer service is provided by the County Sanitation Districts of Los Angeles County (separate public agency); electrical service is provided by Southern California Edison; natural gas service is provided by Southern California Gas; cable television service is provided by Time Warner Cable; telephone service is provided by AT&T and Verizon; refuse pickup and disposal service is provided by Waste Management, Inc of the Antelope Valley under a franchise agreement with the city. The city is actively pursuing state licensing towards construction of its own hybrid natural gas and solar steam turbine power plant. The Los Angeles County Department of Health Services operates the Antelope Valley Health Center in Lancaster, serving Palmdale. In the state legislature Palmdale is located in the 17th Senate District, represented by Republican Steve Knight, and in the 36th Assembly District, represented by Democrat Steve Fox. Federally, Palmdale is located in California's 25th congressional district, which has a Cook PVI of R +7 and is represented by Republican Buck McKeon. According to the latest U.S. Census report released in September 2009, Palmdale has the longest average commute time in the United States at 41.5 minutes. This commute time exceeds that of even New York City. The Antelope Valley Freeway (SR 14) is the major North-South highway connecting Palmdale to Los Angeles and Mojave. State Route 138 (SR 138) is the major east-west highway connecting Palmdale to the Inland Empire and Frazier Park. State Route 18 (SR 18) heads eastward out of the Antelope Valley connecting it to Victorville and via I-15 the Barstow area. This road is commonly used as a route to Las Vegas, Nevada. 10th St. E, from Avenue K in the north to Avenue M-12 in the south, is named Challenger Way in memory of the Space Shuttle Challenger. Avenue M, from 80th Street W in the west to Quartz Hill Road in the east, is named Columbia Way in memory of the ColumbiaSpace Shuttle . Both renamings occurred after the disaster that claimed each shuttle: in 1986Challenger, and in 2003Columbia. Cash-strapped Caltrans only recently began upgrades to SR 138 (nicknamed "Blood Alley" due to the high rate of accidents that occur). CalTrans has had plans on the table for several years for SR 138 and SR 18 to create an east/west freeway between Palmdale and I-15. Due to State funding constraints, this expressway will probably not be completed until near 2020 as the planning, design and construction process can take as many as 10–15 years. There has been discussion of creating the High Desert Corridor tollway in its place. There is also a long-lost plan to continue the freeway from Palmdale along the southern foothills of the Antelope Valley to I-5 in Gorman. State Route 48 (SR 48) is a planned east / west freeway connecting from the Antelope Valley Freeway (SR 14) at Avenue D, the current segment terminus for the western SR 138 branch, to Interstate 5 in Gorman. This freeway is planned to come after SR 138 has its new southern realignment through Palmdale completed, and will follow the existing SR 138 right of way. State Route 122 (SR 122) is a planned north / south freeway from eastern Palmdale, passing east of Edwards Air Force Base to SR 58 near California City. State Route 249 (SR 249) is a planned north / south freeway from southern Palmdale to I-210 in La Canada Flintridge, near Pasadena. The Palmdale Transportation Center, completed in March 2005, is the central mass transit center for the Antelope Valley. It serves as the transit hub for the Antelope Valley Transit Authority, the city's public bus system, as well as an Amtrak, Greyhound Bus, and commuter rail Metrolink station. The station is also designated a stop on the proposed California High Speed Rail System and the proposed Orangeline Maglev rail from Irvine. The LA/Palmdale Regional Airport/Air Force Plant 42 (PMD) has two runways, each over 2.25 miles (3.62 km) in length, although there is currently no commercial airline service at the airport. PMD's commercial terminal is owned and operated by Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA), a municipal department of the City of Los Angeles, on leased land from the U.S. Air Force. Airline service has been sporadic since commercial flights were first offered in 1971. Most recently, United Express/SkyWest Airlines flew between PMD and San Francisco from June 7, 2007, to December 6, 2008. The city of Palmdale formed the Palmdale Airport Authority to move forward to control the facilities and the lease with the USAF, to better develop regional air service in the High Desert. LAWA also owns 17,500 acres (71 km2) of land adjacent to the existing airport. The land was acquired between 1970 and 1983 to be developed into "Palmdale Intercontinental Airport", intended to surpass the air traffic of LAX. The land remains undeveloped. LAWA is currently developing a Master Plan for Palmdale that will guide airport land use and development decisions through 2030. The FAA's Los Angeles Air Route Traffic Control Center is located adjacent to the airport. NASA has consolidated its research, environmental and training aircraft, support services and facilities at the Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale. From the over-sized runway and the massive hangar located at Air Force Plant 42 Site 9, NASA conducts worldwide environmental research with its ER-2 (a U-2 variant) and cutting edge deep space imaging with the 747-based SOFIA infrared telescope. Palmdale is developing a network of bike lanes and bike paths throughout its boundaries. The backbone of the system is a new, grade separated Class A bike path on Avenue S, between 5th Street East and 25th St East, that was included as part of a $20 million highway improvement project, and a similar path on Sierra Highway, that runs from Technology Drive (Avenue P-8) north to meet with the Lancaster segment up to Avenue J. There are also bike lanes on some local streets, leading to parks and schools, as well. Cycling in certain areas of Palmdale carries an increased risk due to higher speed limits for vehicles and also due to the presence of large vehicles. Palmdale is also a location frequently used in staging of the Tour of California. The street system in the Antelope Valley is set out in a grid. Unless otherwise named or curved around due to terrain, east-west roads are called avenues and north-south roads are called streets. The city is essentially on a perfect grid, and the traffic signals are coordinated by a central processing facility at the Civic Center. East-west avenues are lettered mile-by-mile from north to south, starting with Avenue A on the Los Angeles-Kern County line. One mile south of Avenue A is Avenue B, and so on. Smaller roads between major avenues carry suffixes "-1" (nearest to the lettered avenue) through "-15" (nearest to the next lettered avenue). Some "-8" avenues can be major thoroughfares, for example, Avenue R-8 is halfway between Avenue R and Avenue S. North-south streets are numbered with an "east" or "west" suffix with respect to their distances from Division Street. The number increases by 10 for each mile, so a mile east and west of Division Street lie "10th Street East" and "10th Street West" respectively. Some streets like 5th or 15th can also be major thoroughfares. House addresses on east-west "avenues" are numbered according to the "streets". For example, "2001 East Palmdale Boulevard" is just east of 20th Street East, and "6066 West Avenue M-2" is just west of 60th Street West on Avenue M-2, which is 2/16 of a mile south of Avenue M. On north-south streets, numbers are counted from Downtown Los Angeles (thus increase from south to north), and while in the Antelope Valley, the difference is 800 per mile. For example, Palmdale Boulevard (geographically "Avenue Q-8") is 38400, Avenue Q is 38800, Avenue P is 39600, and so on. "37200 25th Street East" would be at the corner of Avenue S. In accordance with Los Angeles County standards, odd numbers are on west and north sides of the road, and even numbers are on east and south sides of the road. Avenue M is the general border of the connected population between Palmdale and Lancaster. Avenue L is actually the longer border between the two cities, east of Challenger Way, but is not as heavily populated. Avenue M has recently been named Columbia Way out of respect for the astronauts on board the Space Shuttle Columbia that disintegrated on re-entry in 2003. 10th Street East north of Columbia Way was renamed Challenger Way in 1987, in honor of those lost in the Challenger Disaster. (All of the shuttles were built in Palmdale.) Palmdale is located in the High Desert, where the summers are very hot and dry, and winters are cool and windy. Palmdale has over 300 days of sunshine per year. The same weather pattern that brings the marine layer stratus and afternoon sea breeze to the Los Angeles Basin brings gusty winds to Palmdale, especially near the foothills on the south side. Except during Santa Ana (northeast) wind events (usually fall and winter), gusty southwest winds blow over Palmdale almost every afternoon and evening all year round. The wind is so reliable that wind turbines are used to generate electricity. Winter: Relatively chilly, wet and windy. Temperatures have gone into the single-digits at times. The wind chill factor can be below zero. This is Palmdale's rainy season and is prone to flash flooding during this time. On occasion, it will snow, sometimes with several inches of accumulation. Average day time highs are in the upper 50s to low 60s while being in the low to mid 30s overnight. Spring: Moderate temperatures. Still occasionally wet. Very windy. Transitional period from winter to summer temperatures is very short. Average daytime highs are in the upper 70s to low 80s while being in the upper 40s to low 50s overnight. Summer: Very hot, dry heat with little or no precipitation. Temperatures frequently soar into triple-digits. However, the high desert where Palmdale is located allows for the temperatures to cool down somewhat at night, unlike the low desert cities of Palm Springs and Blythe. Average day time highs are in the upper 90s while dropping into the mid to upper 70s after midnight. Local electrical bills spike during this period with air-conditioning units running day and night, until early October. Despite the hot temperature, it is very common to experience "summer storms" in which temperatures are consistent but there is heavy rain and thunderstorms. Fall: Moderate temperatures with little or no precipitation. Transitional period from summer to winter temperatures is very short. As a result, the deciduous trees in Palmdale will lose their leaves very rapidly, seemingly overnight, with a short color change. Average day time highs are in the upper 70s and low 80s while dropping into the mid 40s to mid 50s overnight. The 2010 United States Census reported that Palmdale had a population of 152,750. The population density was 1,438.1 people per square mile (555.3/km2). The racial makeup of Palmdale was 74,901 (49.0%) White, 22,677 (14.8%) African American, 1,316 (0.9%) Native American, 6,548 (4.3%) Asian (2.2% Filipino, 0.4% Indian, 0.4% Korean, 0.3% Chinese, 0.3% Vietnamese, 0.2% Japanese), 335 (0.2%) Pacific Islander, 38,773 (25.4%) from other races, and 8,200 (5.4%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 83,097 persons (54.4%). 38.1% of Palmdale is Mexican, 6.2% Salvadoran, 2.4% Guatemalan, 0.7% Puerto Rican, 0.5% Cuban, 0.4% Honduran, 0.4% Nicaraguan, 0.4% Peruvian, 0.3% Ecuadorian, 0.3% Colombian, and 0.2% Argentinean. The Census reported that 152,551 people (99.9% of the population) lived in households, 158 (0.1%) lived in non-institutionalized group quarters, and 41 (0%) were institutionalized. There were 42,952 households, out of which 23,345 (54.4%) had children under the age of 18 living in them, 24,199 (56.3%) were opposite-sex married couples living together, 7,821 (18.2%) had a female householder with no husband present, 3,318 (7.7%) had a male householder with no wife present. There were 2,998 (7.0%) unmarried opposite-sex partnerships, and 316 (0.7%) same-sex married couples or partnerships. 5,828 households (13.6%) were made up of individuals and 1,880 (4.4%) had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.55. There were 35,338 families (82.3% of all households); the average family size was 3.87. The population was spread out with 50,514 people (33.1%) under the age of 18, 17,089 people (11.2%) aged 18 to 24, 40,077 people (26.2%) aged 25 to 44, 34,963 people (22.9%) aged 45 to 64, and 10,107 people (6.6%) who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29.7 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.3 males. There were 46,544 housing units at an average density of 438.2 per square mile (169.2/km2), of which 29,167 (67.9%) were owner-occupied, and 13,785 (32.1%) were occupied by renters. The homeowner vacancy rate was 3.2%; the rental vacancy rate was 9.4%. 102,444 people (67.1% of the population) lived in owner-occupied housing units and 50,107 people (32.8%) lived in rental housing units. Downtown Palmdale is located at , at an elevation of 2,655 feet (809 m) above sea level. According to the United States Census Bureau the city has a total area of 106.2 square miles (275 km2), of which, 106.0 square miles (275 km2) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.78 km2) of it is water (including man-made Lake Palmdale, the most visible and scenic part of the municipal water supply system) . The total area is 0.24% water. The city lies in close proximity to the San Andreas Fault, making it, like many other regions of California, prone to strong earthquakes. This faultline cuts across the Antelope Valley Freeway just north of the Avenue S off-ramp; running westward along the old Butterfield Stage Line (now Elizabeth Lake Road) into Leona Valley. The Palmdale vicinity currently has a total of ten ZIP codes: The most important industry for Palmdale is the aerospace industry. However, in recent times, other manufacturing companies have relocated to Palmdale seeking more affordable land, proximity to Palmdale Airport, and special tax breaks. The special tax breaks granted for companies that relocate to Palmdale is due to the city having the Antelope Valley Enterprise Zone and the Palmdale Federal Foreign Trade Zone. These are special zoning areas within the city that are given various state and federal tax breaks and municipal grant incentives to relocate their business there. These zones were put in effect to help Palmdale and nearby Lancaster draw more jobs to the area so that they would be less dependent on the Los Angeles Basin area for employment, thus relieving pollution and traffic congestion and stabilizing the local economy on several industries. The aerospace industry is known for having “feast or famine” seasons. Palmdale refers to itself with the nickname the "aerospace capital of the United States", and has been the site of research, development, final assembly, flight testing and/or servicing/modifications of the Space Shuttle, B-1 Lancer, X-15, B-2 Spirit, F-117 Nighthawk, F-35 Lightning II, SR-71 Blackbird, Lockheed L-1011 Tristar, and many other aircraft that have been used in the United States Air Force, NASA and air forces and airlines around the world. USAF Plant 42, where the aforementioned aerospace projects occurred / occur is home to major operations of the following aerospace companies: Boeing, Lockheed Martin and its famed Skunk Works, and Northrop Grumman. The Los Angeles World Airports owns the former Boeing hangar (formerly North American Rockwell) at Plant 42 near LA/Palmdale Regional Airport which is one of the largest buildings in the world. The hangar was used for the set of the 2004 film The Terminal, which featured an enormous replica of a JFK International Airport terminal. NASA's SOFIA program relocated its operation to this hangar at Site 9 from Edwards Air Force Base. A number of world class corporations and manufacturing firms have made Palmdale home, helping to diversify the local economy. Delta Scientific, a world leader in high strength vehicle barrier systems, supplying protection for many federal, state and local buildings, and a prime supplier to the military and US State Department for embassies and other installations worldwide, and US Pole, a major manufacturer of street lighting poles, are major anchor tenants in the Fairway Business Park. The Palmdale Trade and Commerce Center is home to many other major manufacturing, industrial, corporate offices and other employers, as well as home to the Palmdale Auto Mall. A number of medical and related support offices are coming on-line to meet the needs of the new Palmdale Regional Medical Center. On July 8, 2009 Quallion LLC, which manufactures lithium ion cells and battery packs, announced plans to build a battery manufacturing plant in Palmdale if it won a government grant being offered by the U.S. Department of Energy. The Antelope Valley Mall is the preeminent retail shopping destination in the region, with a wide variety of dining choices on its restaurant row. Beginning in the 1960s, Palmdale was home to Don Babb's The Model A Ford Company, which became Classic Manufacturing and Supply, builder of exact reproduction and custom steel bodies and parts for hot rods and customs. Antelope Valley New Press
Deep South Wrestling (DSW) was a professional wrestling promotion based out of McDonough, Georgia. Deep South worked in tandem with World Wrestling Entertainment (WWE) as a developmental territory from 2005 until April 18, 2007. Deep South was owned by Jody Hamilton, former director of the WCW Power Plant. A previous version of Deep South, which had a working agreement with the American Wrestling Association, was also run by Hamilton from 1986 to 1988. Deep South Wrestling held their inaugural show on September 1, 2005. Two months later, the promotion crowned Mike Mizanin as their first Deep South Heavyweight Champion. The promotion gained a timeslot on Comcast Sports South on Sunday nights at 11:30 p.m. On July 9, 2006, the promotion debuted a live event at Six Flags Over Georgia in Austell, Georgia. It was announced that DSW would begin performing live shows at venues other than Six Flags, starting in the nearby town of Griffin, Georgia. On May 18, High Impact (Mike Taylor & Tony Santarelli) won a tournament to crown the first Deep South Tag Team Champions. It was announced on October 18, 2006 that Deep South Wrestling had landed a television deal with MavTV. On April 18, 2007, WWE announced that they were ending its relationship with Deep South. Deep South confirmed the cancellation of their April 19, 2007 television taping on their website. The closure of the promotion was announced on Deep South's website on April 19, although Deep South held its final event on April 12. Because of Deep South parting ways, talent not under WWE developmental contracts left the promotion. Those that remained under contract were re-assigned to Ohio Valley Wrestling. On April 30, 2009, it was announced to the wrestling media that Hamilton, under the DSW banner, had filed a lawsuit against WWE. The suit claims WWE committed breach of contract and intentional interference with contractual and business relations. The suit was filed on April 20 and is pending in Fulton County, Georgia.][
1988-1996 Private
(subsidiary of TBS)
1996 Public
(subsidiary of Time Warner-TBS)
World Championship Wrestling, Inc. (WCW Inc.) is a subsidiary of WWE, Inc. Once a privately held American professional wrestling promotion based in Atlanta, Georgia, it began as a regional promotion affiliated with the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA), named Jim Crockett Promotions until November 1988, when Ted Turner and his Turner Broadcasting purchased the promotion, initially renaming it Universal Wrestling Corporation (UWC), but was changed to World Championship Wrestling. Turner, and later Time-Warner, owned WCW until 2001 when the selected assets were purchased by its primary competitor, the World Wrestling Federation (WWF), now known as WWE. The company is still listed under Georgia Corporations as of July 2013 under Time Warner as an active corporation. In the mid-1990s WCW improved their economic stability, largely due to the promotion of Eric Bischoff to Executive Producer, the hiring of Hulk Hogan, the introduction of Nitro and the resultant Monday Night Wars, the New World Order and other innovative concepts. However, numerous problems led to the company losing its lead. Its fall from grace and the various factors leading up to it have been heavily documented within the industry. Since 2001, WCW images and video footage have been widely distributed in WWF/E media, and many WCW-themed articles and DVD packages have been published. The name "World Championship Wrestling" was first used as a brand and television show in 1982. Jim Barnett, who had worked for the World Championship Wrestling promotion in Australia, came to Atlanta in the 1970s during an internal struggle over the NWA Georgia territory. Barnett wound up as the majority owner of the territory, and he wound up using the name for the territory's television program in 1982. The brand eventually passed on to Jim Crockett Promotions. However, it was not until November 21, 1988 that an actual NWA-affiliated promotion called World Championship Wrestling appeared on the national scene, under the ownership of media mogul Ted Turner, based in Atlanta, Georgia. While initially the new company was called Universal Wrestling Corporation (launched on October 11, 1988), very shortly following the purchase the decision was made to utilize the familiar "World Championship Wrestling" name for the new promotion. The company went through various changes in its leadership and booking during the following years. Some people, like Jim Herd and Kip Frey, were completely lacking in wrestling experience; others, like Bill Watts, Ole Anderson, and Dusty Rhodes had extensive wrestling experience, but were so entrenched in the old territorial methods of promotion that they were ineffective at building WCW's audience. While Eric Bischoff has received much criticism for some of his mishandling while he acted as WCW Executive Producer (and later, WCW President), he combined an understanding of wrestling with a willingness to make changes that were needed in order to help WCW become more visible in the eyes of the media and advertisers. These changes including moving some television tapings to Disney-MGM Studios in Orlando, and signing both main-event performers and young stars from around the world. Some of the creative freedoms that Bischoff granted main-event level talent helped to bring the company down, as main-event level talent were less than cooperative in helping rising stars fulfill their potential, a staple of the industry. Once Bischoff was relieved of his duties in 1999, Vince Russo, a former writer for the World Wrestling Federation, came on board to become the lead writer of WCW. Russo did not last long in his position, but in April 2000, WCW opted to bring Russo and Bischoff back in hopes that the duo might re-spark interest in WCW. The two, however, did not get along well and Bischoff soon left the company. From 2000 to 2001, Monster Jam had a series of monster trucks based on wrestlers' names. These include nWo (2000), Sting (2000–2001), Nitro Machine (2000–currently Inferno), Madusa (2000–present) and Goldberg (2000–currently Maximum Destruction). The first to go was nWo, which only ran for a season. Next, all but Goldberg, Nitro, and Madusa were retired after the WCW sponsorship was lost. Nitro then became Flashfire, then was converted into Inferno. Madusa has stayed as the same name ever since it was created, because it is driven by former WCW superstar Madusa. As for Goldberg, it was changed to Team Meents in 2002, then into Maximum Destruction, which debuted in 2003 and continues to compete in the series. WCW also had a presence in NASCAR from the mid-1990s to 2000, sponsoring the #29 team in the Busch Grand National Series full-time and the #9 Melling Racing team in the Winston Cup Series part-time. In 1996, Kyle Petty's #49 car in the Busch Grand National series was sponsored by the nWo. Then, Wally Dallenbach, Jr. sponsored WCW driving for Galaxy Motorsports for a couple races. As 2000 came to a close, a number of potential buyers for WCW were rumored to show interest in the company. Ted Turner, however, was still in charge of Time Warner prior to the final merger of AOL and Time Warner in 2001, and most offers were rejected. Eric Bischoff, working with Fusient Media Ventures, made a bid to acquire the company in January 2001 (shortly following the AOL/Time Warner merger), and it appeared that WCW would continue. One of the primary backers in the WCW deal backed out, however, leaving Fusient to take that offer off the table while it attempted to bring a new deal around. In the meantime, the World Wrestling Federation began speaking to the new AOL Time Warner about acquiring the WCW brand. Jamie Kellner was handed control over the Turner Broadcasting division, and deemed WCW wrestling to be out of line with their image. As a result, WCW programming was canceled on both TBS and TNT, leaving Vince McMahon's company, which at the time had an exclusive deal with Viacom, free to acquire the trademarks, video libraries and a few contracts. During the sale, WCW was in litigation, with various lawsuits pending, and AOL Time Warner still had to pay various performers their guaranteed deals, as many had contracts directly with the parent company, and not with WCW. Since Vince McMahon only acquired select assets, the company that was once WCW became known as Universal Wrestling Corporation once again; its only purpose now, however, was to deal with old contracts and lawsuits. At the outset of WCW's existence, as well as with the promotions that came before it, the company was strongly identified with the Southern style of professional wrestling (or rasslin'), which emphasized athletic in-ring competition over the showmanship and cartoonish characters of the WWF. This identification persisted into the 1990s, even as the company signed former WWF stars such as Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage. WCW dominated pro wrestling's television ratings from 1996 to 1998 (84 straight weeks) mainly due to its incredibly popular New World Order storyline, but thereafter began to lose heavy ground to the WWF, which had recovered greatly due to its new "Attitude" branding. Repetitive story lines, questionable booking issues, and corporate restrictions eventually led the promotion to begin losing large amounts of money, leading to parent company AOL Time Warner selling the name copyrights to the WWF for $2.5 million in 2001. Shortly after the purchase, Vince McMahon purchased the entire tape library for an additional $1.7 million, bringing the final tally of World Championship Wrestling's sale to $4.2 million. WCW started out as a regional promotion in the late 1980s focusing mainly in the Deep South. It started growing nationally a few years later, which led to its rivalry with the WWF. Even though WCW folded in 2001, its legacy lived on in the WWF. The WWF kept the WCW United States Championship, the WCW Cruiserweight Championship, the WCW World Tag Team Championship, and the WCW World Heavyweight Championship. Eventually, the titles were unified into their WWF counterparts. In 2003, now known as the WWE, the company resurrected the United States title to be competed for exclusively on SmackDown. When Hulk Hogan came back to the WWE, the WWE kept his Hollywood nickname. In 2004, the WWE brought back the Great American Bash pay-per-view and also in 2009, released Starrcade: The Essential Collection as a three-disc DVD set. In August 2009, WWE released a DVD set chronicling the history of WCW called The Rise and Fall of WCW. Commemorating the 10 year anniversary of the purchase of the company, WWE re-opened WCW.com, highlighting the history of the company that had once had the upper-hand in the professional wrestling marketplace. WWE released a documentary showing highlights from WCW Nitro's history, The Very Best of WCW Monday Nitro, hosted by Diamond Dallas Page. WCW was a main focus in the WWE '12 video game released by THQ for Xbox 360, Sony Playstation 3 and Nintendo Wii in 2011. In the Games Story Mode, many WCW superstars were featured such as : Arn Anderson, Ricky Steamboat, Road Warriors (Hawk & Animal), Kevin Nash, Booker T, Vader, and Eddie Guerrero.
Palmdale High School Logo phs.jpg
Fighting Falcons
Palmdale High School is located in Palmdale, California and is part of the Antelope Valley Union High School District. About 4,000 students attend Palmdale High School in grades 9 through 12. Palmdale High School was founded in 1956.
Littlerock High School is a public, co-educational high school built in 1989, located in Littlerock, California. The school serves Littlerock and its surrounding communities such as Lake Los Angeles, Pearblossom, and Llano. It is the a part of the Antelope Valley Union High School District (AVHSD). Littlerock High School is designated as a Title I school.
Highland High School is located in Palmdale, California and is part of the Antelope Valley Union High School District. About 4,000 students attend Highland High School in grades 9 through 12. It received a California Distinguished School award in 2005. Highland High School was founded in 1989 in response to Palmdale's rapid population growth. Palmdale High School was not large enough to serve the children of the new families moving into the Antelope Valley. Highland High School is now the largest high school under the Antelope Valley Union High School District. The school has seen a rapid increase in the number of students each year as the area around Highland becomes more developed. The school also attracts students outside of its own district as one of the two schools in the area (the other being Quartz Hill High School) to offer the International Baccalaureate program. The Highland HS principal announced on January 23, 2013 that the IB program would be phased out at Highland HS. Future students would be able to take two years of pre-IB at Highland but would have to transfer to Quartz Hill HS to complete their diploma. Quartz Hill HS is an impacted high school and transfer students would have to go through open enrollment. The school's website defines its mission as follows: "The mission of Highland High School is to provide an opportunity for all students to be empowered with the knowledge and skills derived from a quality core and elective curriculum; to encourage all students to develop their capacity for critical thought and effective communication in order to function in the jobs available today and in the future; and to become well-informed and productive citizens."
California Palmdale High School Palmdale

Southern California, often abbreviated as SoCal, is a megaregion or megapolitan area in the southern portion of the U.S. state of California. Large urban areas include the Greater Los Angeles, and Greater San Diego. The region stretches along the coast from about Santa Barbara to the United States and Mexico border, and from the Pacific Ocean inland to the Nevada and Arizona borders. The heavily built-up urban area stretches along the coast from Ventura, through the Greater Los Angeles Area, the Inland Empire and down to San Diego. Southern California is a major economic center for the state of California and the United States.

Southern California's population encompasses eight metropolitan areas, or MSAs: the Los Angeles metropolitan area, consisting of Los Angeles and Orange counties; the Inland Empire, consisting of Riverside and San Bernardino counties; the San Diego metropolitan area; the Bakersfield metropolitan area; the Oxnard–Thousand Oaks–Ventura metropolitan area; the Santa Barbara metro area; the San Luis Obispo metropolitan area; and the El Centro area. Out of these, three are heavy populated areas: the Los Angeles area with over 12 million inhabitants, the Riverside-San Bernardino area with over 4 million inhabitants, and the San Diego area with over 3 million inhabitants. For CSA metropolitan purposes, the five counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and Ventura are all combined to make up the Greater Los Angeles Area with over 17.5 million people. With over 22 million people, southern California contains roughly 60% of California's population.

California

Lake Palmdale is an artificial lake completed in 1924 along with the nearby Littlerock Reservoir and the Littlerock Dam. It is part of the California State Water Project and is fed by the California Aqueduct. It is located in the city of Palmdale near the city's southern edge, in the small Anaverde Valley between the San Andreas Fault and the base of Mount Tenhi.

Antelope Valley is located in northern Los Angeles County, California and the southeast portion of Kern County, California, and constitutes the western tip of the Mojave Desert. It is situated between the Tehachapi and the San Gabriel Mountains.

The valley was named for the pronghorns that are said to have roamed there until being eliminated by hunters and bad weather in the 1880s. The principal cities in the Antelope Valley are Palmdale and Lancaster.

Palmdale is a city located in the center of northern Los Angeles County, California, United States.

Palmdale was the first community within the Antelope Valley to incorporate as a city on August 24, 1962; 47 years later, in November 2009, voters approved creating a charter city. Palmdale is separated from Los Angeles by the San Gabriel Mountain range. Palmdale's population was 152,750 at the 2010 census, up from 116,670 as of the 2000 census. Palmdale is the 32nd most populous city in California and ranks 158th nationally. According to the Greater Antelope Valley Economic Alliance report of 2009 the Palmdale / Lancaster, CA Urbanized Area (a US Census Bureau defined term) has a population of 483,998.

Covering an area of 163,696 sq mi (423,970 km2), California is geographically diverse. The Sierra Nevada, the fertile farmlands of the Central Valley, and the arid Mojave Desert of the south are some of the major geographic features of this U.S. state. It is home to some of the world's most exceptional trees: the tallest (coast redwood), most massive (Giant Sequoia), and oldest (bristlecone pine). It is also home to both the highest (Mt. Whitney) and lowest (Death Valley) points in the 48 contiguous states.

The state is generally divided into Northern and Southern California, although the boundary between the two is not well defined. San Francisco is decidedly a Northern California city and Los Angeles likewise a Southern California one, but areas in between do not often share their confidence in geographic identity. The US Geological Survey defines the geographic center of the state at a point near North Fork, California.

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