Question:

When did the show Blues Clues first come on TV?

Answer:

Blues Clues came on in 1996. My baby daughter was delighted!

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In general, American music may refer to music of the Americas or music of the United States.

Specifically, American Music can refer to:

Entertainment

Television is one of the major mass media of the United States. Household ownership is 96.7% and the majority of households have more than one. Its peak was the 1996-1997 season with 98.4% ownership. [1] As a whole, the television networks of the United States are the largest and most syndicated in the world.

As of August 2013, there are approximately 114,200,000 American households with television.

Blue's Room is a children's puppet show television series which is aimed at preschoolers, aged 2–6, and it is a spin-off series of the popular Blue's Clues series. It originally started as a short segment that came near the end of the original Blue's Clues show, originally cast off as Blue's personal imaginary world once Joe took over the show after his brother Steve "went to college". Later on, when Joe also decided to leave the show Blue's Clues, the short segment became a show itself, with Joe appearing in some episodes.

What distinguishes Blue's Room from Blue's Clues is that Blue herself transforms from an animated blue puppy into an English-speaking puppet that directly interacts with the child with open ended questions or asks if a presented idea or solution is correct. The Season One episode "Meet Blue's Baby Brother" is a turnaround episode for this series, bringing most of the concepts of Blue's Clues into the new series and getting additional interest in the series.

Blue's Clues is an American children's television show that premiered on September 8, 1996 on the cable television network Nickelodeon, and ran for a decade, until August 6, 2006. Producers Angela Santomero, Todd Kessler and Traci Paige Johnson combined concepts from child development and early-childhood education with innovative animation and production techniques that helped their viewers learn. It was hosted originally by Steve Burns, who left in 2002 to pursue a music career, and later by Donovan Patton. The show mainly focuses on an animated blue-spotted dog named Blue who initiates a game of Blue's Clues in which she leaves three pawprint clues for her owner Steve (Joe after Steve's departure from the show) to find in order to answer a question she is thinking of. Burns was a crucial reason for the show's success, and rumors that surrounded his departure were an indication of the show's emergence as a cultural phenomenon. Blue's Clues became the highest-rated show for preschoolers on American commercial television and was crucial to Nickelodeon's growth. It has been called "one of the most successful, critically acclaimed, and ground-breaking preschool television series of all time". A spin-off called Blue's Room premiered in 2004.

The show's producers and creators presented material in narrative format instead of the more traditional magazine format, used repetition to reinforce its curriculum, and structured every episode the same way. They used research about child development and young children's viewing habits that had been conducted in the thirty years since the debut of Sesame Street in the U.S. They revolutionized the genre by inviting their viewers' involvement. Research was part of the creative and decision-making process in the production of the show, and was integrated into all aspects and stages of the creative process. Blue's Clues was the first cutout animation series for preschoolers, and resembled a storybook in its use of primary colors and its simple construction paper shapes of familiar objects with varied colors and textures. Its home-based setting was familiar to American children, but had a look unlike other children's TV shows. A live production of Blue's Clues, which used many of the production innovations developed by the show's creators, toured the U.S. starting in 1999. As of 2002, over 2 million people had attended over 1,000 performances.

Clues Blues

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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