Question:

What year did Tom Dempsey kick his NFL record 63 yard field goal?

Answer:

On 11/8/70, Tom Dempsey of New Orleans Saints kicked a record 63 yard field goal against Detroit at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans.

More Info:

Thomas Dempsey is a former American football placekicker in the National Football League for the New Orleans Saints (1969–1970), Philadelphia Eagles (1971–1974), Los Angeles Rams (1975–1976), Houston Oilers (1977) and Buffalo Bills (1978–1979). He attended high school at San Dieguito High School and played college football at Palomar College. Unlike the "soccer style" approach used by nearly all place kickers today, Dempsey used a straight approach which was the style primarily used to kick the ball during his era.

Dempsey is most widely known for his NFL record 63-yard field goal, kicked in the final two seconds to give the New Orleans Saints a 19–17 win over the Detroit Lions on November 8, 1970 at Tulane Stadium in New Orleans. This record still stands as of 2013, although it has been equaled three times; on October 25, 1998, by Jason Elam of the Denver Broncos against the Jacksonville Jaguars, at Mile High Stadium in Denver, on September 12, 2011, by Sebastian Janikowski of the Oakland Raiders against the Denver Broncos, at Sports Authority Field at Mile High in Denver, and by David Akers of the San Francisco 49ers at Lambeau Field, on September 9, 2012. In a preseason game in 2002, Ola Kimrin kicked a 65-yard field goal, but as it was a preseason game, it is ineligible for the NFL record.

The National Football League (NFL) is a professional American football league composed of 32 teams divided equally between the National Football Conference (NFC) and the American Football Conference (AFC). The highest level of professional football in the world, the NFL runs a 17-week regular season from the week after Labor Day to the week after Christmas, with each team playing sixteen games and having one bye week. Out of the league's 32 teams, six (four division winners and two wild-card teams) from each conference compete in the NFL playoffs, a single-elimination tournament culminating in the Super Bowl, played between the champions of the NFC and AFC. The champions of the Super Bowl are awarded the Vince Lombardi Trophy; various other awards exist to recognize individual players and coaches. Most games are played on Sunday afternoons; some games are also played on Mondays and Thursdays during the regular season. There are games on Saturdays during the last few weeks of the regular season and the first two playoff weekends.

The NFL was formed on August 20, 1920, as the American Professional Football Conference; the league changed its name to the American Professional Football Association (APFA) on September 17, 1920, and changed its name to the National Football League on June 24, 1922, after spending the 1920 and 1921 seasons as the APFA. In 1966, the NFL agreed to merge with the rival American Football League (AFL), effective 1970; the first Super Bowl was held at the end of that same season in January 1967. Today, the NFL has the highest average attendance (67,591) of any professional sports league in the world and is the most popular sports league in the United States. The Super Bowl is among the biggest club sporting events in the world and individual Super Bowl games account for many of the most-watched programs in American history. At the corporate level, the NFL is an nonprofit 501(c)(6) association. The NFL's executive officer is the commissioner, who has broad authority in governing the league.

American football (known as football in the United States and gridiron in some other countries) is a sport played by two teams of eleven players on a rectangular field 120 yards long by 53.33 yards wide with goalposts at each end. The offense attempts to advance an oval ball (the football) down the field by running with or passing it. They must advance it at least ten yards in four downs to receive a new set of four downs and continue the drive; if not, they turn over the football to the opposing team. Points are scored by advancing the ball into the opposing team's end zone for a touchdown, kicking the ball through the opponent's goalposts for a field goal or by the defense tackling the ball carrier in the offense's end zone for a safety. The team with the most points at the end of a game wins.

American football evolved in the United States, originating from the sport of rugby football. The first game of American football was played on November 6, 1869 between two college teams, Rutgers and Princeton, under rules resembling rugby and soccer. A set of rule changes drawn up from 1880 onward by Walter Camp, the "Father of American Football", established the snap, eleven-player teams and the concept of downs, and later rule changes legalized the forward pass, created the neutral zone and specified the size and shape of the football.

Football

In American football a play is a close to the ground "plan of action" or "strategy" used to move the ball down the field. A play occurs at either the snap from the center or at kickoff. Most commonly plays occur at the snap during a down. These plays vary between basic to very complicated. Football players keep a record of these plays in their playbook.

Goal refers to a method of scoring in many sports. It can also refer to the physical structure or area of the playing surface where scoring occurs.

In several sports, a goal is the sole method of scoring, and thus the final score is expressed in the total number of goals scored by each team. In other sports, a goal may be one of several scoring methods, and thus may be worth a different set number of points than the others. A few of these sports use the term field goal to distinguish one scoring method from another.

Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans from 1926 to 1980. Officially known as the Third Tulane Stadium, it replaced the "Second Tulane Stadium" where the Telephone Exchange Building is now located. The former site is currently bound by Willow Street to the south, Ben Weiner Drive to the east, the Tulane University property line west of McAlister Place, and the Hertz Basketball/Volleyball Practice Facility and the site of Yulman Stadium to the north.

The stadium hosted three of the first nine Super Bowls in 1970, 1972, and 1975.

National Football League (1967–present)

Black, Old Gold

John David "J. D." Roberts (born October 24, 1932) was an American football player and coach, serving as head coach of the New Orleans Saints of the National Football League from the middle of the 1970 season until his dimsissal after four preseason games in 1973.

Roberts was hired by Saints owner John Mecom on November 3, 1970, replacing Tom Fears after New Orleans began 1970 with a 1-5-1 record. His first game came five days later at Tulane Stadium against the Detroit Lions. The Saints won 19-17 when Tom Dempsey kicked a 63-yard (58 m) field goal, a record which broke the previous NFL mark by seven yards. Dempsey's record was tied by Jason Elam of the Denver Broncos in 1998 and Sebastian Janikowski of the Oakland Raiders in 2010, but nobody has bettered the mark.

Charles Michael Durkee (born June 25, 1944 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a former professional American football player. In 1967, Durkee became the first kicker for the expansion New Orleans Saints. Durkee was with the Saints in 1967 and 1968, and again in 1971 and a portion of the 1972 season. He did not play in the NFL in 1969 or 1970.

Durkee's most productive season was in 1968, when he was responsible for 84 points as the Saints' kicker. He made 19 of 37 field goal attempts and 27 out of 27 extra points. However, the Saints would use Tom Dempsey in 1969 and 1970. Although Dempsey made a 63-yard field goal to win a game against Detroit in 1970, which still stands as the longest filed goal in the history of the NFL (it was tied by Jason Elam of the Denver Broncos in 1998), he was traded by the Saints to the Philadelphia Eagles in 1971. Durkee then returned to the Saints, serving as their kicker in 1971 and part of the 1972 season.

Entertainment is a form of activity that holds the attention and interest of an audience, or gives pleasure and delight. It can be an idea or a task, but is more likely to be one of the activities or events that have developed over thousands of years specifically for the purpose of keeping an audience's attention. Although people's attention is held by different things, because individuals have different preferences in entertainment, most forms are recognisable and familiar. Storytelling, music, drama, dance, and different kinds of performance exist in all cultures, were supported in royal courts, developed into sophisticated forms and over time became available to all citizens. The process has been accelerated in modern times by an entertainment industry which records and sells entertainment products. Entertainment evolves and can be adapted to suit any scale, ranging from an individual who chooses a private entertainment from a now enormous array of pre-recorded products; to a banquet adapted for two; to any size or type of party, with appropriate music and dance; to performances intended for thousands; and even for a global audience.

The experience of being entertained has come to be strongly associated with amusement, so that one common understanding of the idea is fun and laughter, although many entertainments have a serious purpose. This may be the case in the various forms of ceremony, celebration, religious festival, or satire for example. Hence, there is the possibility that what appears as entertainment may also be a means of achieving insight or intellectual growth.

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New Orleans (/n ˈɔrliənz/ or /ˈn ɔrˈlnz/, locally /n ˈɔrlənz/ or /ˈnɔrlənz/; French: La Nouvelle-Orléans [la nuvɛlɔʁleɑ̃] ( listen)) is a major United States port and the largest city and metropolitan area in the state of Louisiana. The population of the city was 343,829 as of the 2010 U.S. Census. The New Orleans metropolitan area (New Orleans–Metairie–Kenner Metropolitan Statistical Area) had a population of 1,167,764 in 2010 and was the 46th largest in the United States. The New Orleans–Metairie–Bogalusa Combined Statistical Area, a larger trading area, had a 2010 population of 1,214,932.

The city is named after Orléans, a city located on the Loire River in Centre, France, and is well known for its distinct French Creole architecture, as well as its cross-cultural and multilingual heritage. New Orleans is also famous for its cuisine, music (particularly as the birthplace of jazz), and its annual celebrations and festivals, most notably Mardi Gras. The city is often referred to as the "most unique" in America.

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