Question:

What time is first light in the morning?

Answer:

6:33am Tuesday (MDT) - Sunrise in Denver, CO 80219 - 18 hours 41 minutes from now

More Info:

MDT

The Mountain Time Zone of North America keeps time by subtracting seven hours from Greenwich Mean Time, during the shortest days of autumn and winter (UTC−7), and by subtracting six hours during daylight saving time in the spring, summer, and early autumn (UTC−6). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time at the 105th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory. In the United States, the exact specification for the location of time zones and the dividing lines between zones is set forth in the Code of Federal Regulations at 49 CFR 71.

In the United States and Canada, this time zone is generically called Mountain Time (MT). Specifically, it is Mountain Standard Time (MST) when observing standard time (fall and winter), and Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) when observing daylight saving time (spring and summer). The term refers to the fact that the Rocky Mountains, which range from northwestern Canada to the US state of New Mexico, are located almost entirely in the time zone. In Mexico, this time zone is known as the Pacific Zone.

A time zone is a region on Earth that has a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. It is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time, so time zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions.

Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) by a whole number of hours (UTC−12 to UTC+14), but a few are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (for example: Nepal Standard Time, NPT). Some higher latitude countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by changing clocks by an hour. Many land time zones are skewed toward the west of the corresponding nautical time zones. This also creates a permanent daylight saving time effect.

The Pacific Time Zone observes standard time by subtracting eight hours from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC−8). The clock time in this zone is based on the mean solar time of the 120th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory. During daylight saving time, its time offset is UTC−7 and is thus based on the mean solar time of the 105th meridian west of the Greenwich Observatory.

In the United States and Canada, this time zone is generically called the Pacific Time Zone (PTZ). Specifically, it uses Pacific Standard Time (PST) - Pacific Time (PT) - when observing standard time (mid-fall through late winter), and Pacific Daylight Time (PDT) - Mountain Time (MT) - when observing daylight saving time (late winter through mid-fall). Most of Canada uses daylight saving time. In Mexico the UTC−8 time zone is known as the Northwest Zone, which is synchronized with the U.S. PDT daylight saving schedule.

The Central Time Zone is a time zone in parts of Canada, the United States, Mexico, Central America, some Caribbean Islands, and part of the Eastern Pacific Ocean. Time in the zone is six hours behind Coordinated Universal Time (Greenwich Mean Time - GMT). During daylight saving time (DST), time in the zone is five hours behind GMT. It is also commonly referred to as Central Standard Time CST or Chicago Standard Time. Any of these names are appropriate.

The province of Manitoba is the only province or territory in Canada that observes Central Time in all areas.

Daylight saving time (DST)—also summer time in British English— is the practice of advancing clocks during the lighter months so that evenings have more apparent daylight and mornings have less. Typically clocks are adjusted forward one hour near the start of spring and are adjusted backward in autumn.

The modern idea of daylight saving was first proposed in 1895 by George Vernon Hudson and it was first implemented by Germany and Austria-Hungary starting on 30 April 1916. Many countries have used it at various times since then. Much of the United States used DST in the 1950s and 1960s, and DST use expanded following the 1970s energy crisis. It has been widely used in North America and Europe since then.

Time in the United States, by law, is divided into nine standard time zones covering the states and its possessions, with most of the United States observing daylight saving time for approximately the summer months. The time zone boundaries and DST observance are regulated by the Department of Transportation. Official and highly precise timekeeping services (clocks) are provided by two federal agencies: the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) (an agency of the Department of Commerce); and its military counterpart, the United States Naval Observatory (USNO). The clocks run by these services are kept synchronized with each other as well as with those of other international timekeeping organizations.

It is the combination of the time zone and daylight saving rules, along with the timekeeping services, which determines the legal civil time for any U.S. location at any moment.

Canada is divided into six time zones, based on proposals by Scottish Canadian railway engineer Sir Sandford Fleming, who helped pioneer the world's time zone system.

Times used:

Most of Saskatchewan observes Central Standard Time (CST). However, since it is situated completely within the Mountain Time Zone, daylight saving time is effectively in place year round. Saskatchewan does not change its clocks back in winter.

The city of Lloydminster is the only exception to this arrangement: it is located in the neighbouring Mountain Time Zone to the West, one hour behind CST. However since Lloydminster does change its clocks, the time in Saskatchewan is the same in all parts of the province during the summer months.

Idaho

The scheduling of television programming in North America must cope with eighteen time zones: the United States (excluding territories) has six time zones (Hawaii-Aleutian, Alaska, Pacific, Mountain, Central, and Eastern), with further variation in the observance of daylight saving time. Canada also has six time zones (Pacific, Mountain, Central, Eastern, Atlantic and Newfoundland). Mexico has three time zones (Pacific, Mountain and Central). Greenland has three (Atlantic time, UTC−03 and UTC−01, with UTC−02 not used). This requires broadcast and pay television networks in each country to shift programs in time to show them in different regions.

Denver Denver

The Denver Nuggets are a professional basketball team based in Denver, Colorado that plays in the National Basketball Association. The team was founded as the Denver Larks in 1967 as a charter franchise of the American Basketball Association (ABA) but changed its name to Rockets before the first season. It changed its name again to the Nuggets in anticipation of an ABA-NBA merger in 1974, and played for the final ABA Championship title in 1976, losing to the New York Nets. The team joined the NBA in 1976 after the ABA-NBA merger and has had some periods of success, making the playoffs for nine consecutive seasons in the 1980s and doing the same for the previous ten seasons. However, it has not made an appearance in a championship round since its last year in the ABA.

The Nuggets play their home games at Pepsi Center, which they share with the Colorado Avalanche of the NHL.

American Football League (1960–69)

National Football League (1970–present)

Denver International Airport (IATA: DEN, ICAO: KDEN, FAA LID: DEN), often referred to as DIA, is an airport in Denver, Colorado. At 140 square kilometres (35,000 acres) it is the largest airport in the United States by total area. Runway 16R/34L is the longest public use runway in the United States. In 2012 Denver International Airport was the 11th-busiest airport in the world by passenger traffic with 53,156,278 passengers.

It was the fifth-busiest airport in the world by aircraft movements with over 635,000 movements in 2010. The airport is in northeastern Denver and is operated by the City & County of Denver Department of Aviation. DIA was voted Best Airport in North America by readers of Business Traveler Magazine six years in a row (2005–2010) and was named "America's Best Run Airport" by Time Magazine in 2002.

The University of Denver (DU), founded in 1864, is the oldest private university in the Rocky Mountain Region of the United States. The University of Denver is a coeducational, four-year university in Denver, Colorado. DU currently enrolls approximately 5,000 undergraduate students and 6,000 graduate students. The 125-acre (0.51 km2) main campus is a designated arboretum and is located primarily in the University Neighborhood, about seven miles (11 km) south of downtown Denver.

On March 3, 1864 the university was founded as the Colorado Seminary by John Evans, the former Governor of Colorado Territory, who had been appointed by President Abraham Lincoln. John Evans is the namesake of Evans Avenue (which bisects the DU campus and runs through the Denver metro area), Mount Evans (a 14,264 foot mountain visible from DU), and the city of Evanston, Illinois (the site of Northwestern University, founded by Evans prior to his founding of DU).

         

The Denver Pioneers are the sports teams of the University of Denver (DU). They play in the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I, The Pioneers' major conference affiliations changed in 2013-14. Denver moved its primary affiliation from the Western Athletic Conference to The Summit League, men's hockey moved from the Western Collegiate Hockey Association to the National Collegiate Hockey Conference, and men's lacrosse moved from the ECAC Lacrosse League to the Big East Conference.

Henry John Deutschendorf, Jr. (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997), known professionally as John Denver, was an American singer, songwriter, actor, activist, and humanitarian. He was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s. After traveling and living in numerous locations while growing up in his military family, Denver began his music career in folk music groups in the late 1960s. His greatest commercial success was as a solo singer, starting in the 1970s. Throughout his life, Denver recorded and released approximately 300 songs, about 200 of which he composed. He performed primarily with an acoustic guitar and sang about his joy in nature, his enthusiasm for music, and his relationship trials. Denver's music appeared on a variety of charts, including country and western, the Hot 100Billboard, and adult contemporary, in all earning him twelve gold and four platinum albums with his signature songs "Take Me Home, Country Roads", "Annie's Song", "Rocky Mountain High", and "Sunshine on My Shoulders".

Denver further starred in films and several notable television specials in the 1970s and 1980s. In the following decades, he continued to record, but also focused on calling attention to environmental issues, lent his vocal support to space exploration, and testified in front of Congress to protest against censorship in music. He was known for his love of the state of Colorado, which he sang about numerous times. He lived in Aspen, Colorado, for much of his life. He was named Poet Laureate of the state in 1974. The Colorado state legislature also adopted "Rocky Mountain High" as one of its state songs in 2007. Denver was an avid pilot, and died in a crash of his personal aircraft at the age of 53.

The University of Colorado Denver, shortened as CU Denver, UC Denver, or UCD, is a public research university in the U.S. state of Colorado. It is one of three schools of the University of Colorado system. The university has two campuses — one in downtown Denver at the Auraria Campus, and the other at the Anschutz Medical Campus located in neighboring Aurora. The single university is the result of the 2004 consolidation of the "University of Colorado at Denver" and "University of Colorado Health Sciences Center". The official name of the university is University of Colorado Denver | Anschutz Medical Campus.

The University of Colorado Denver is located on Auraria Campus in Downtown Denver, Colorado while the University of Colorado Hospital is located on the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora, Colorado nearly 10 miles away. UCH is also affiliated with the neighboring Children's Hospital, and with the National Jewish Medical and Research Center and Denver Health Medical Center in Denver. There are currently more than 27,000 students at the school's two physical campuses in downtown Denver and in Aurora. The school also offers classes via CU Online.

             

The Denver Pioneers men's ice hockey team is a National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)Division I college ice hockey program that represents the University of Denver. The Pioneers are a member of the National Collegiate Hockey Conference (NCHC). They play at Magness Arena in Denver, Colorado. The Pioneers rank (with the University of North Dakota) second in all-time NCAA Men's Ice Hockey Championships with 7. Only the University of Michigan (9) has more Championships. Since the creation of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association in 1959, the Pioneers have won 9 WCHA Regular Season Championships (now the recipients of the MacNaughton Cup) and 14 WCHA Playoff Championships (now the recipients of the Broadmoor Trophy). Over sixty Pioneers have gone on to play in the National Hockey League, including Keith Magnuson, Kevin Dineen, Matt Carle (2006 Hobey Baker Award winner) and Paul Stastny.

Colorado Avalanche
1995-present

                        

Television in Australia began there experimentally as early as 1929 in Melbourne with using the stations 3DB and 3UZ using the Radiovision system by Gilbert Miles and Donald McDonald, and later from other locations, such as Brisbane in 1934.

Mainstream professional television was launched on 16 September 1956 in Sydney. The new medium was introduced by Bruce Gyngell with the words 'Good evening, and welcome to television', and has since seen the introduction of colour, and digital television, and the planned shutdown of analogue broadcasts set to take place between 2010 to 2013 (depending on the area).

The geography of the state of Colorado is diverse, encompassing both rugged mountainous terrain, vast plains, desert lands, desert canyons, and mesas. The state of Colorado is defined as the geospherical rectangle that stretches from 37°N to 41°N latitude and from 102°03'W to 109°03'W longitude (25°W to 32°W from the Washington Meridian). Colorado is one of only three U.S. states (with Wyoming and Utah) that have only lines of latitude and longitude for boundaries.

The summit of Mount Elbert at 4401 meters (14,440 ft) elevation in Lake County is the state's highest point and the highest point in the entire Rocky Mountains. Colorado has approximately 550 mountain peaks that exceed 4000 meters (13,123 ft) elevation. Colorado is the only U.S. state that lies entirely above 1000 meters (3281 ft) elevation. The state's lowest elevation is 1010 meters (3315 ft) at the point on the eastern boundary of Yuma County where the Arikaree River flows into the state of Kansas.

The Denver metropolitan area is a conurbation in the U.S. state of Colorado centered on the city of Denver. There are several formal and informal definitions for the metropolitan area, ranging from the continuously urbanized area within the six central counties of Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas and Jefferson]which?[ to the entire Front Range Urban Corridor that extends from Colorado Springs in the south to Fort Collins in the north.

The United States Office of Management and Budget has delineated the Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, CO Metropolitan Statistical Area consisting of ten Colorado counties: the City and County of Denver, Arapahoe County, Jefferson County, Adams County, Douglas County, the City and County of Broomfield, Elbert County, Park County, Clear Creek County, and Gilpin County. The United States Census Bureau estimates that the population was 2,645,209 as of July 1, 2012, an increase of +4.00% since the 2010 United States Census, and ranking as the 21st most populous metropolitan statistical area of the United States.

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