Question:

What sentence with the word beatitude?

Answer:

It may have been simply that it was the number of the beatitude of mercy but there may have been some other significance.

More Info:


Beatitudes
In Christianity, the Beatitudes (anglicized from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Beatitudines) are a set of teachings by Jesus that appear in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke. They each are a proclamation without a narrative. The term beatitude comes from the Latin adjective beātitūdō which means happy, fortunate, or blissful. Far more than "happiness" or "joy", the word "blessed" in these teachings has been defined as an "exclamation of the inner joy and peace that comes with being right with God". Each teaching is proverb-like: "cryptic, precise, and full of meaning. Each one includes a topic that forms a major biblical theme". They are expressed as eight blessings in the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew. Four similar blessings appear in the Sermon on the Plain in Luke and are followed by four woes that mirror the blessings. Each Beatitude consists of two phrases: the condition and the result. In almost all cases the phrases used are familiar from an Old Testament context, but in the sermon Jesus elevates them to new teachings. Together, the Beatitudes present a new set of Christian ideals that focus on love and humility rather than force and exaction. They echo the highest ideals of the teachings of Jesus on mercy, spirituality, and compassion. While opinions may vary as to exactly how many distinct statements into which the Beatitudes should be divided (ranging from eight to ten), most scholars consider them to be only eight. These eight of Matthew follow a simple pattern: Jesus names a group of people normally thought to be unfortunate and pronounces them blessed. The eight Beatitudes in Matthew 5:3–12 during the Sermon on the Mount each begins with: Blessed are... In verses , the eight Beatitudes are followed by what is often viewed as a commentary—a further clarification of the eighth one with specific application being made to the disciples. Instead of referencing third-person plural "they", Jesus changes to second-person "you": R. T. France considers verses 11 and 12 to be based on Isaiah 51:7. The Beatitudes unique to Matthew are the meek, the merciful, the pure of heart, and the peacemakers. The other four have similar entries in Luke, but are followed almost immediately by "four woes". The four Beatitudes in Luke 6:20–22 during the Sermon on the Plain. Verse 20 introduces them by saying, "Looking at his disciples, he said:" Then parallel to Matthew, each Beatitude begins with: Blessed are you... Verse 23—"Rejoice in that day and leap for joy, because great is your reward in heaven. For that is how their ancestors treated the prophets".—seems parallel to the commentary in Matthew 5:11-12 which reads, "Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you". The four woes that follow these in Luke 6:24–26 each begins with: Woe to you...: The fourth "woe" in verse 26 may be parallel to the commentary in Matthew 5:11-12. These woes are distinct from the Seven Woes of the Pharisees that appear later in Luke 11:37-54. Each Beatitude consists of two phrases: the condition and the result. In almost all cases the phrases used are familiar from an Old Testament context, but in the Sermon on the Mount Jesus elevates them to new levels and teachings. Together, the Beatitudes present a new set of ideals that focus on love and humility rather than force and exaction. They echo the highest ideals of Jesus' teachings on spirituality and compassion. The term the meek would be familiar in the Old Testament, e.g., as in Psalms 37:11. Although the Beatitude concerning the meek has been much praised even by some non-Christians such as Mahatma Gandhi, some view the admonition to meekness skeptically. Friedrich Nietzsche considered the verse to be embodying what he perceived as a slave morality. In Christian teachings, the Works of Mercy, which have corporal and spiritual components, have resonated with the theme of the Beatitude for mercy. These teachings emphasize that these acts of mercy provide both temporal and spiritual benefits. The theme of mercy has continued in devotions such as the Divine Mercy in the 20th century. The peacemakers have been traditionally interpreted, not only live in peace with others but do their best to promote friendship among mankind and between God and man. St. Gregory of Nyssa interpreted it as "Godly work", which was an imitation of God's love of man. In the Book of Mormon, a religious text of Mormonism, Jesus gives a sermon to a group of indigenous Americans including statements very similar to Matthew 6: Yea, blessed are the poor in spirit 'who come unto me,' for theirs is the kingdom of heaven (3 Nephi 12:3). And blessed are all they who do hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they shall be filled 'with the Holy Ghost' (3 Nephi 12:6). Similarly, the Bahá'í Lawḥ-i-Aqdas contains the statement: Blessed the soul that hath been raised to life through My quickening breath and hath gained admittance into My heavenly Kingdom. The Qur'an never quotes the Bible except for Q:21:105 which resembles Psalm 25:13 referred to in Matthew 5:5; but the Qur'an uses "righteous" rather than "meek". However, the Qur'an (e.g., "say the word of humility and enter the gate of paradise") and some Hadith (e.g., "My mercy exceeds my anger") contain some passages with somewhat similar tone, but distinct phraseology, from the Beatitudes. The Bhagavad Gita, and the traditional writings of Buddhism (e.g., some of the Mangala Sutta) have been interpreted as including teachings whose intentions resemble some of the messages of Beatitudes (e.g., humility and absence of ego), although their wording is not the same.

Matthew 5:12
Matthew 5:12 is the twelfth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the tenth verse of the Sermon on the Mount. This verse is generally seen as part of an expansion of the eight Beatitude, others see it as the second half of the ninth Beatitude, a small group feel it is the tenth Beatitude and thus brings to a close a second Decalogue. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 5:12 France notes that the word glad in the original is actually a more complex term meaning "joy in the face of persecution and martyrdom" that has no easy translation in English. Some have been concerned about how closely this verse links good behaviour to eternal rewards, and that it implies that concern about these rewards is the main consideration in being moral. Albright and Mann notes that the idea of rewards and punishments has "undeniable prominence" in the Gospel of Matthew. Hill feels that reward can be read as simply "good repute," the opposite of the slander in the previous verse. Albright and Mann note that heaven is not here referring to the modern idea of a place that one goes after death which only developed later, rather it refers simply to "being with God." Schweizer notes that some have read prophets as meaning that this verse, and perhaps that which went before it, was only directed at the elite group of Christ's disciples and not the general population. Schweizer feels that it actually has just the opposite meaning and is instead showing that the promises in Jeremiah 31:34 and Isaiah 54:13 that all would someday be equal to the prophets had come to pass. Hill notes that the Essenes called each other prophets, and that Jesus might have here adopted that usage.

Matthew 5:10
Matthew 5:10 is the tenth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the eighth verse of the Sermon on the Mount, and also eighth, and to some the last, of what are known as the Beatitudes. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 5:10 St. Augustine was convinced that there should actually be seven Beatitudes, as seven was considered the holy number. He thus felt that this one was not actually a separate one, but rather a rephrasing of the first Beatitude at Matthew 5:3. To Augustine this eighth Beatitude symbolized Christ rising on the eighth day, which was also the first day. As with 5:3 this verse cites the Kingdom of Heaven as the reward, also like that first verse the reward is in the present tense, the other six have it in the future. Kodjak believes that this parallelism with the first verse is to emphasize that this one is the conclusion of the Beatitudes and 5:11-12 should not be considered part of the group. Davies and Allison also agree that the verse "looks like it has been pieced together from other Beatitudes." Gundry feels the word translated as persecuted should perhaps best be read as hounded. Hill notes that persecuted is a participle in the perfect tense which indicates that Jesus' followers had already been persecuted for their righteousness. This verse has often been cited as an argument for Christian toleration and acceptance. John Locke prominently cited it in his A Letter Concerning Toleration. This argument was rebutted by inquisitors and others who pointed out that only those persecuted for "righteousness' sake" were to be blessed, something they did not think applied to the enemies of the church.

Matthew 5:3
Matthew 5:3 is the third verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the opening verse of the Sermon on the Mount, and the section of the sermon known as the Beatitudes. The World English Bible translates the passage as: The King James Version has essentially the same translation. For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 5:3 This verse opens the first of nine statements of who is blessed. Each, except for the last, follows the same pattern of naming a group of people and the reward they will receive. Albright and Mann prefer the word fortunate to blessed. They argue that the term has none of the religious implications that the word blessed today has in the English language. Betz notes that in Jesus' time blessed was a common way of describing someone who is wealthy. In Solon's discussion of Croesus in Herodotus, for instance, the link between being blessed and being wealthy is assumed. Kodjak believes that this opening of the sermon was meant to shock the audience, it was a deliberate inversion of standard values. Today he feels that the text is so common that its shock value has been lost. While not a mainstream view, Betz feels this Beatitude has important pre-Christian precedents. He traces it back to Socrates' notion of enkrateia, which explained that the philosopher was one who had no interest in wealth. This idea was adopted by the Cynics, who rejected wealth and saw poverty as the only route to freedom. This group, while small, had a wide influence and some of their ideas were embraced by some Jewish communities at the time of Christ. The poor translates more closely to beggar than to one merely of few possessions. In the New Testament the term applies to those who require the charity of others in order to survive. Nolland notes that there have historically been three main interpretations of what is meant by "the poor" in this verse. One view is that it refers to the disadvantaged, those forced to the fringe of society. An alternative is that it refers to those who willingly surrender their belongings as a sign of piety. The third view is that poverty refers to hardship in general, and not simply economic disadvantage. Matthew makes a second reference to the poor at Matthew 11:5. In that verse it is a reference to Isaiah. Luke 6:20 simply has "blessed are the poor," that Matthew adds "in spirit" is seen to be of great import. The phrase does not appear in the Old Testament, but Psalm 33(34):19 comes close. The phrase "poor in spirit" occurs in the Dead Sea Scrolls, and seems to have been an important notion to the Qumran community. Scholars agree that "poor in spirit" does not mean lacking in spirit, be it courage, the Holy Spirit, or religious awareness. Rather it is that poverty is not only a physical condition, but also a spiritual one. Schweizer feels the extra note asserts that simply being poor is not a ticket into heaven, but rather only those who understand the nature of real poverty are blessed. To this group blessing is promised without qualification. Schweizer also feels that the addendum makes clear that the poor are not to be envied. He also notes that nowhere in this section is there any mention of a need or obligation to help the poor. The important phrase Kingdom of Heaven, generally understood as referring to the Messianic age after the Second Coming. For a full discussion of Matthew's use of this phrase see Matthew 3:2. To be "poor in spirit" is a reference to the heart recognizing its poverty and revealing the need for salvation and the things of God. It isn't a vow of literal poverty. Blessed are the "poor in spirit" as those who realize their spiritual inadequacy and unfitness for Heaven for this will lead them to seek the mercy of God, fuel their desire for salvation and discovery of Jesus. This has nothing to do with money.

Matthew 5:8
Matthew 5:8 is the eighth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the sixth verse of the Sermon on the Mount, and also sixth of what are known as the Beatitudes. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 5:8 This verse is generally believed to have been taken from Psalm 24:3-5 either by Jesus or the author of Matthew who was adding this verse that is not found in Luke. A number of scholars have been certain that there were originally seven Beatitudes, as seven was a holy number. Since this verse is so similar to the Psalm some believe it was the one incorrectly integrated into the Sermon on the Mount. Hill speculates that the verse could actually be a mistranslation of Isaiah 61:1, and should have read "only the contrite will see God." The word purity is not believed to refer to one who was ritually cleansed, but rather to internal spiritual purity as noted by the "in heart" addition. At the time the heart was literally seen as the seat of emotion and the soul, though today the verse is read metaphorically. Davies and Allison read a pure heart as being one that is simple and undivided in allegiance.

Matthew 5:5
Matthew 5:5 is the fifth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the third verse of the Sermon on the Mount, and also third of what are known as the Beatitudes. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 5:5 This well known verse is perhaps the most famous of the Beatitudes. Unlike the previous two, however, this one has no parallel in Luke's Sermon on the Plain. Luke's Sermon contains four Beatitudes and four Woes. There is considerable debate over whether this Beatitude was in Q, and Luke left it out, or if it is an original addition by the author of Matthew. Gundry's theory is that the author of Matthew wanted to remove the woes for later use against the Pharisees in Matthew 23, however he wanted to keep the same eightfold structure and thus needed to create four new sayings. He sees this verse as essentially just a rephrasing of Matthew 5:3, this same wording is also found at Psalm 37:11. Meek and poor, which can also be translated as humble, mean essentially the same thing. Schweizer feels meek should be understood as meaning powerless. The phrase "inherit the earth" is also similar to "theirs is the Kingdom of Heaven" in 5:3. Schweizer notes that two terms reflect the two different views of the end times current when Matthew was writing. One view was that the end of the world would see all the believers brought up to join the Kingdom of Heaven. The other view was that the end times would have God come down to directly rule Earth, and the chosen people would then be given dominion over the entire world. Hill does not see the two verses referring to different things. He does not feel that word "earth" means the physical world. Rather he notes that Deuteronomy 4:1 and 16:20 both use the word inherit to refer to the Israelites taking possession of the Holy Land. Hill feels that earth, which can also be translated as land, is an allusion to the new Holy Land, which might not be on Earth. A refined meaning of this phrase has been seen to say that those that are quiet or nullified will one day inherit the world. Meek in the Greek literature of the period most often mean gentle or soft Nolland writes that a more accurate interpretation for this verse is powerless Clarke notes how important and revolutionary this elevation of meekness was in the Mediterranean's societies of the time that placed enormous stock in honour and status. This verse has been much praised, even by some non-Christians such as Mahatma Gandhi. Some have seen it less favourably. Baron d'Holbach felt that this verse, and those around it, reflected the interests of Christians when they were a small and powerless sect. He felt that whenever Christians gained power these views were inevitably abandoned. Friedrich Nietzsche was harshly critical over this verse, which to him embodied the "slave morality" of Jesus. It has also been criticized by James Joyce, William Blake, and Theodore Dreiser who all rejected a life without striving. As one of the most famous of Beatitudes, the meek shall inherit the earth has appeared many times in works of art and popular culture:

Matthew 5:11
Matthew 5:11 is the eleventh verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the ninth verse of the Sermon on the Mount. Some consider this verse to be the beginning of the last Beatitude, but most disagree seeing it as more of an expansion on the eighth and final Beatitude in the previous verse. In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads: The World English Bible translates the passage as: For a collection of other versions see BibRef Matthew 5:11 While this verse begins with the same "blessed are" opening of the previous eight Beatitudes it quickly varies from them in structure. It shifts from the third to the second person and abandons the simple virtue/reward structure. It is thus generally not seen as a ninth Beatitude, but as a commentary on the eighth Beatitude directed to the disciples. Schweizer feels this verse and the next were a late addition clarifying the previous verse. It expands on what type of persecution will be faced, and also is more explicit on the eventual reward. France feels it might also integrate elements from Isaiah 51:7. It also is somewhat similar to Luke 6:22, and both may be drawn from the same original source. This verse is also seen to give important information about the Christians at the time the Gospel was written. The discussion of the persecution of Christians, which did not begin until some time after Jesus' crucifixion, to most scholars is evidence that this is the period the Gospel of Matthew was written in. Other believers feel that Jesus is merely accurately predicting the events that will unfold after his death. The Gospel of Matthew refers to only verbal attacks, and this was likely the main form of abuse suffered by the Christians at this time. Schweizer notes that slander and insults were of great importance in that era. Verbal attacks meant that the Christians were ostracized from their communities, and in that era community support was essential to survival. Gundry notes that Luke has excommunication as one of the forms of persecution, perhaps indicating the differences in situation between the writings of the two Gospels. The verse is careful to note that the persecuted are blessed only when they are reproached and slandered falsely. Schweizer notes that the early Christian communities had problem with impostors only pretending to be Christian who might have been worthy of reproach by others.

New Testament

The New Testament (Koine Greek: Ἡ Καινὴ Διαθήκη, Hē Kainḕ Diathḗkē) is the second major part of the Christian biblical canon, the first part being the Old Testament. Although Christians hold different views from Jews about the Old Testament—that is, the Hebrew Scriptures—Christians regard both the Old and New Testaments together as sacred scripture. The contents of the New Testament deal explicitly with first-century Christianity. Therefore, the New Testament (in whole or in part) has frequently accompanied the spread of Christianity around the world. It reflects and serves as a source for Christian theology. Both extended readings and phrases directly from the New Testament are also incorporated (along with readings from the Old Testament) into the various Christian liturgies. The New Testament has influenced not only religious, philosophical, and political movements in Christendom, but also has left an indelible mark on its literature, art, and music.

The New Testament is an anthology, a collection of Christian works written in the common Greek language of the first century, at different times by various writers, who were early Jewish disciples of Jesus of Nazareth. In almost all Christian traditions today, the New Testament consists of 27 books. The original texts were written in the first and perhaps the second centuries of the Christian Era, generally believed to be in Koine Greek, which was the common language of the Eastern Mediterranean from the Conquests of Alexander the Great (335–323 BC) until the evolution of Byzantine Greek (c. 600). All of the works which would eventually be incorporated into the New Testament would seem to have been written no later than around AD 150.

Christianity

Matthew 5:12 is the twelfth verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the tenth verse of the Sermon on the Mount. This verse is generally seen as part of an expansion of the eight Beatitude, others see it as the second half of the ninth Beatitude, a small group feel it is the tenth Beatitude and thus brings to a close a second Decalogue.

In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads:

Matthew 5:11 is the eleventh verse of the fifth chapter of the Gospel of Matthew in the New Testament. It is the ninth verse of the Sermon on the Mount. Some consider this verse to be the beginning of the last Beatitude, but most disagree seeing it as more of an expansion on the eighth and final Beatitude in the previous verse.

In the King James Version of the Bible the text reads:


Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon on the Mount (anglicized from the Matthean Vulgate Latin section title: Sermo in monte) is a collection of sayings and teachings of Jesus, which emphasizes his moral teaching found in the Gospel of Matthew (chapters 5, 6 and 7). It is the first of the Five Discourses of Matthew and takes place relatively early in the Ministry of Jesus after he has been baptized by John the Baptist and preached in Galilee.

The Sermon is the longest piece of teaching from Jesus in the New Testament, and has been one of the most widely quoted elements of the Canonical Gospels. It includes some of the best known teachings of Jesus, such as the Beatitudes, and the widely recited Lord's Prayer. To most believers in Jesus, the Sermon on the Mount contains the central tenets of Christian discipleship.

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