Question:

What position did Hank Aaron play for the Braves?

Answer:

Hank Aaron was the pitcher while with the Braves.

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Hank Aaron

MLB Records:

Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer", or "Hammerin' Hank", is a retired American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder from 1954 through 1976. Aaron spent 21 seasons with the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) before playing for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American League (AL) for the final two years of his career. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on their "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list. He held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is the only player to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times.


Hank Aaron

MLB Records:

Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer", or "Hammerin' Hank", is a retired American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder from 1954 through 1976. Aaron spent 21 seasons with the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) before playing for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American League (AL) for the final two years of his career. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on their "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list. He held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is the only player to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times.

The Hank Aaron Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) players selected as the top hitter in each league, as voted on by baseball fans and members of the media. It was introduced in 1999 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Hank Aaron's surpassing of Babe Ruth's career home run mark of 714 home runs. The award was the first major award to be introduced by Major League Baseball in 19 years.

For the 1999 season, a winner was selected using an objective points system. Hits, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI) were given certain point values and the winner was the player who had the highest tabulated points total.


Hank Aaron Stadium

Hank Aaron Stadium is a baseball park in Mobile, Alabama. It hosts the Mobile BayBears, a minor-league professional team in the Southern League. The stadium opened in 1997 and has a capacity of 6,000. The ballpark was named after Major League Baseball's home run king (from 1974 to 2007) and Mobile native Hank Aaron. It also features a commemorative plaque outside the stadium to honor each Mobilian enshrined at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. Hank Aaron Stadium is unique in that the luxury suites are at field level. Thus, infield seating for the general public is elevated from the field by approximately twenty feet.

Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream
Willie Mays

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American professional baseball player who spent the majority of his Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a center fielder with the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

Mays won two MVP awards and shares the All-Star record of most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron & Stan Musial. Ted Williams said, "They invented the All-Star Game for Willie Mays." Mays ended his career with 660 home runs, third at the time of his retirement, and currently fourth all-time. He was a center fielder and won a record-tying 12 Gold Gloves starting the year the award was introduced six seasons into his career.


Barry Bonds

MLB Records

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). In a career spanning 1986 to 2007, Bonds played his first seven seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates before spending 15 years with the San Francisco Giants. He is the son of former major league All-Star Bobby Bonds.


Atlanta Braves

              

The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team in Atlanta, Georgia, playing in the Eastern Division of the National League. The Braves have played home games at Turner Field since 1997 and play spring training games in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. In 2017, the team is to move to a new $672 million stadium complex in the Cumberland highrise district of Cobb County just north of the I-285 bypass.

San Diego Padres (1997–2006)

Mobile BayBears (1997–present)


Babe Ruth

MLB Records

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), nicknamed "the Bambino" and "the Sultan of Swat", was an American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher and outfielder who played for 22 seasons on three teams, from 1914 through 1935. He was known for his hitting brilliance setting career records in his time for home runs (714, since broken), slugging percentage (.690), runs batted in (RBI) (2,213, since broken), bases on balls (2,062, since broken), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164). Ruth originally entered the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox as a starting pitcher, but after he was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919, he converted to a full-time right fielder. He subsequently became one of the American League's most prolific hitters and with his home run hitting prowess, he helped the Yankees win seven pennants and four World Series titles. Ruth retired in 1935 after a short stint with the Boston Braves, and the following year, he became one of the first five players to be elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

This is a list of the top 300 Major League Baseball home run hitters. In the sport of baseball, a home run is a hit in which the batter scores by circling all the bases and reaching home plate in one play, without the benefit of a fielding error. This can be accomplished either by hitting the ball out of play while it is still in fair territory (a conventional home run), or by an inside the park home run.

Barry Bonds holds the Major League Baseball home run record with 762. He passed Hank Aaron, who is currently second with 755, on August 7, 2007. The only other player to have hit 700 or more is Babe Ruth with 714. Willie Mays (660), Alex Rodriguez (654), Ken Griffey, Jr. (630), Jim Thome (612) and Sammy Sosa (609) are the only other players to have hit 600 or more.

Braves
Atlanta Braves

              

The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team in Atlanta, Georgia, playing in the Eastern Division of the National League. The Braves have played home games at Turner Field since 1997 and play spring training games in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. In 2017, the team is to move to a new $672 million stadium complex in the Cumberland highrise district of Cobb County just north of the I-285 bypass.


2012 Atlanta Braves season

The 2012 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 16th season of home games at Turner Field, 47th season in Atlanta, and 137th season of the franchise. After a late season collapse in 2011 kept the Braves from the playoffs, the team returned to the postseason for the second time in three seasons as a Wild Card team, with a record of 94-68. They lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in the one-game Wild Card Playoff.

Following the conclusion of the 2011 season, Braves general manager Frank Wren highlighted several important areas to improve during the offseason. Since most players were committed contractually to the team in 2012, Wren acknowledged that he would likely make few major changes. One spot that was mentioned for a major overhaul was the shortstop position, where Alex González had played since the Yunel Escobar trade with Toronto in July 2010. González entered the offseason as a free agent and proved too expensive for the team. Wren ultimately allowed prospect Tyler Pastornicky the starting duties in 2012, until he was replaced by Andrelton Simmons in mid-June. When Simmons was hurt in July, Jack Wilson, Paul Janish, and Martín Prado filled in for him. While center fielder Michael Bourn returned to his position in 2012, Wren also suggested that the corner outfield positions were areas of contention. In 2011, the Atlanta outfielders finished the season last in the National League in on-base plus slugging and slugging percentage. Wren stated that right fielder Jason Heyward and left fielder Martín Prado had no guarantee of getting the starting jobs in 2012. On the day after the Braves were eliminated from the playoffs in 2011, Wren said that veteran starter Derek Lowe was unlikely to have a spot in the starting rotation in 2012, due his poor performance in 2011 and a plethora of rookie pitching talent in the Braves farm system. With Lowe guaranteed $15 million in 2012, Wren projected that any of Lowe's salary picked up by another team would significantly assist his efforts to find a shortstop or outfielder. By the end of October, Lowe was traded to the Indians.

The 1992 Atlanta Braves season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Braves finishing first in the National League West with a record of 98 wins and 64 losses, clinching their second straight division title.

In the National League Championship Series, the Braves defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in seven games. In the World Series, Atlanta faced the Toronto Blue Jays, who were making their first appearance in the World Series. However, the Blue Jays won in six games, becoming the first non-U.S.-based team to win a World Series.


2013 Atlanta Braves season

The 2013 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 17th season of home games at Turner Field, 48th season in Atlanta, and 138th season of the franchise.

The Braves won their first game of the season (7–5) against the Philadelphia Phillies on April 1. They finished the season 96-66 and first place in the National League East, but lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the Division Series.

The 1993 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 128th in existence and their 28th since moving to Atlanta. The Braves were looking to improve on their 98-64 record from 1992 and win the National League pennant for a third consecutive year.

The Braves finished the season with a 104-58 record to win the National League West for the third consecutive year after trailing the San Francisco Giants, who finished in second place by one game, for most of the season in what is generally regarded as last real pennant race before playoff expansion. 1993 was also the last year that the team competed in the National League West, as they would shift to the National League East for 1994.

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta. They would go on to win their seventh consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 18 games over the second place New York Mets.

The team featured six all stars: shortstop Walt Weiss and third baseman Chipper Jones were voted as starters, while first baseman Andres Galarraga, catcher Javy Lopez, and pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were selected as reserves.


2009 Atlanta Braves season

The 2009 Atlanta Braves season featured the Braves' attempt to reclaim a postseason berth for the first time since 2005. The Braves were once again skippered by Bobby Cox, then in his 24th season managing the team. It was the Braves' 44th season in Atlanta, and the 138th season overall for the franchise.


2011 Atlanta Braves season

The 2011 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 46th season in Atlanta, and the 136th of the franchise. For the first time since the 1990 season, Bobby Cox did not manage the club, having retired following the 2010 season. He was succeeded by Fredi González, the former third-base coach for the Braves between 2003 and 2006. After entering the playoffs with their first franchise Wild Card berth in 2010, the Braves attempted to return to the postseason for a second consecutive season. Entering the final month of the regular season with a record of 80–55 and an 8 1⁄2-game lead in the Wild Card standings, the Braves went 9–18 in September to finish the season with a record of 89–73. This September collapse caused the team to fall one game behind the St. Louis Cardinals in the Wild Card race after the final scheduled game of the season, which consequently eliminated them from postseason contention.

Names highlighted in bold appear in table above.


2008 Atlanta Braves season

The 2008 Atlanta Braves season featured the team's attempt to reclaim a postseason berth for the first time since 2005. During the 2008 season, the Braves were once again skippered by Bobby Cox, now in his 19th season (of his second stint) managing Atlanta. As a result of John Schuerholz taking the position of team president, the Braves entered the offseason with Frank Wren as their general manager.

The team wore a patch on the right sleeve "BEACH" in honor of former Braves player and bench coach Jim Beauchamp.

The 2006 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 135th for the franchise and 41st in Atlanta. During the season, the Braves attempted to win the NL East.

Finishing with a 79–83 record, not only did the Braves miss the playoffs for the first time since 1990 (not counting the strike-affected 1994 season), but also their first losing season and worst record since that year.


Hank Aaron

MLB Records:

Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer", or "Hammerin' Hank", is a retired American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder from 1954 through 1976. Aaron spent 21 seasons with the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) before playing for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American League (AL) for the final two years of his career. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on their "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list. He held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is the only player to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times.


Hank Aaron

MLB Records:

Henry Louis "Hank" Aaron (born February 5, 1934), nicknamed "Hammer", or "Hammerin' Hank", is a retired American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) right fielder from 1954 through 1976. Aaron spent 21 seasons with the Milwaukee and Atlanta Braves in the National League (NL) before playing for the Milwaukee Brewers of the American League (AL) for the final two years of his career. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked Aaron fifth on their "100 Greatest Baseball Players" list. He held the MLB record for career home runs for 33 years, and he still holds several MLB offensive records. He hit 24 or more home runs every year from 1955 through 1973, and is the only player to hit 30 or more home runs in a season at least fifteen times.

The Hank Aaron Award is given annually to the Major League Baseball (MLB) players selected as the top hitter in each league, as voted on by baseball fans and members of the media. It was introduced in 1999 to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Hank Aaron's surpassing of Babe Ruth's career home run mark of 714 home runs. The award was the first major award to be introduced by Major League Baseball in 19 years.

For the 1999 season, a winner was selected using an objective points system. Hits, home runs, and runs batted in (RBI) were given certain point values and the winner was the player who had the highest tabulated points total.


Hank Aaron Stadium

Hank Aaron Stadium is a baseball park in Mobile, Alabama. It hosts the Mobile BayBears, a minor-league professional team in the Southern League. The stadium opened in 1997 and has a capacity of 6,000. The ballpark was named after Major League Baseball's home run king (from 1974 to 2007) and Mobile native Hank Aaron. It also features a commemorative plaque outside the stadium to honor each Mobilian enshrined at the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York. Hank Aaron Stadium is unique in that the luxury suites are at field level. Thus, infield seating for the general public is elevated from the field by approximately twenty feet.

Hank Aaron: Chasing the Dream
Willie Mays

Willie Howard Mays, Jr. (born May 6, 1931), nicknamed "The Say Hey Kid" is a retired American professional baseball player who spent the majority of his Major League Baseball (MLB) career as a center fielder with the New York and San Francisco Giants before finishing with the New York Mets. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1979, his first year of eligibility.

Mays won two MVP awards and shares the All-Star record of most All-Star Games played (24) with Hank Aaron & Stan Musial. Ted Williams said, "They invented the All-Star Game for Willie Mays." Mays ended his career with 660 home runs, third at the time of his retirement, and currently fourth all-time. He was a center fielder and won a record-tying 12 Gold Gloves starting the year the award was introduced six seasons into his career.


Barry Bonds

MLB Records

Barry Lamar Bonds (born July 24, 1964) is an American former baseball left fielder who played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB). In a career spanning 1986 to 2007, Bonds played his first seven seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates before spending 15 years with the San Francisco Giants. He is the son of former major league All-Star Bobby Bonds.


Atlanta Braves

              

The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team in Atlanta, Georgia, playing in the Eastern Division of the National League. The Braves have played home games at Turner Field since 1997 and play spring training games in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. In 2017, the team is to move to a new $672 million stadium complex in the Cumberland highrise district of Cobb County just north of the I-285 bypass.


Mobile BayBears

San Diego Padres (1997–2006)

Mobile BayBears (1997–present)


Babe Ruth

MLB Records

George Herman "Babe" Ruth, Jr. (February 6, 1895 – August 16, 1948), nicknamed "the Bambino" and "the Sultan of Swat", was an American professional baseball player. He was a Major League Baseball (MLB) pitcher and outfielder who played for 22 seasons on three teams, from 1914 through 1935. He was known for his hitting brilliance setting career records in his time for home runs (714, since broken), slugging percentage (.690), runs batted in (RBI) (2,213, since broken), bases on balls (2,062, since broken), and on-base plus slugging (OPS) (1.164). Ruth originally entered the major leagues with the Boston Red Sox as a starting pitcher, but after he was sold to the New York Yankees in 1919, he converted to a full-time right fielder. He subsequently became one of the American League's most prolific hitters and with his home run hitting prowess, he helped the Yankees win seven pennants and four World Series titles. Ruth retired in 1935 after a short stint with the Boston Braves, and the following year, he became one of the first five players to be elected into the National Baseball Hall of Fame.

This is a list of the top 300 Major League Baseball home run hitters. In the sport of baseball, a home run is a hit in which the batter scores by circling all the bases and reaching home plate in one play, without the benefit of a fielding error. This can be accomplished either by hitting the ball out of play while it is still in fair territory (a conventional home run), or by an inside the park home run.

Barry Bonds holds the Major League Baseball home run record with 762. He passed Hank Aaron, who is currently second with 755, on August 7, 2007. The only other player to have hit 700 or more is Babe Ruth with 714. Willie Mays (660), Alex Rodriguez (654), Ken Griffey, Jr. (630), Jim Thome (612) and Sammy Sosa (609) are the only other players to have hit 600 or more.

pitcher Pitcher
Starting pitcher

In baseball or softball, a starting pitcher (also referred to as the starter) is the pitcher who delivers the first pitch to the first batter of a game. A pitcher who enters the game after the first pitch of the game is a relief pitcher. Starting pitchers are expected to pitch for a significant portion of the game, although whether they do can depend on many factors, including effectiveness, stamina, health, and strategic reasons.

A starting pitcher in professional baseball usually rests three or four days after pitching a game, before pitching another. Therefore, most professional baseball teams have four or five starting pitchers on their rosters. These pitchers, and the sequence in which they pitch, is known as the rotation. In modern baseball, a five-man rotation is most common.


Pitcher plant

Pitcher plants are carnivorous plants whose prey-trapping mechanism features a deep cavity filled with liquid known as a pitfall trap. It is widely assumed pitfall traps evolved by epiascidiation (infolding of the leaf with the axadial or upper surface becoming the inside of the pitcher), with selection pressure favouring more deeply cupped leaves over evolutionary time. The pitcher trap evolved independently in three eudicot lineages and one monocot lineage, representing a case of convergent evolution. Some pitcher plant families (such as Nepenthaceae) are placed within clades consisting mostly of flypaper traps, indicating that some pitchers may have evolved from the common ancestors of today's flypaper traps by loss of mucilage]citation needed[.

Foraging, flying or crawling insects such as flies are attracted to the cavity formed by the cupped leaf, often by visual lures such as anthocyanin pigments, and nectar bribes. The rim of the pitcher (peristome) is slippery, when moistened by condensation or nectar, causing insects to fall into the trap. Pitcher plants may also contain waxy scales, protruding aldehyde crystals, cuticular folds, downward pointing hairs, or guard-cell-originating lunate cells on the inside of the pitcher to ensure that insects cannot climb out. The small bodies of liquid contained within the pitcher traps are called phytotelmata. They drown the insect, and the body of it is gradually dissolved. This may occur by bacterial action (the bacteria being washed into the pitcher by rainfall) or by enzymes secreted by the plant itself. Furthermore, some pitcher plants contain mutualistic insect larvae, which feed on trapped prey, and whose excreta the plant absorbs. Whatever the mechanism of digestion, the prey items are converted into a solution of amino acids, peptides, phosphates, ammonium and urea, from which the plant obtains its mineral nutrition (particularly nitrogen and phosphorus). Like all carnivorous plants, they grow in locations where the soil is too poor in minerals and/or too acidic for most plants to survive.

Softball
Pitcher (container)

A pitcher is a container with a spout used for storing and pouring contents which are liquid in form. Generally a pitcher also has a handle, which makes pouring easier. A ewer is a vase-shaped pitcher, often decorated, with a base and a flaring spout, though the word is now unusual in informal English describing ordinary domestic vessels. An example of an ewer is the America's Cup given to the winner of the America's Cup sailing regatta match. In English speaking countries outside North America, a jug is any container with a handle and a mouth and spout for liquid—American "pitchers" are more likely to be called jugs elsewhere.

The Sporting News established in 1944 the Pitcher of the Year Award. The award is given annually to the pitcher in each league as having the most outstanding season, no awards were given in 1946 or 1947. This award was established before there was a Cy Young Award. The Cy Young Award is voted by baseball writers from each city, which critics claim the writers who follow a particular team or player throughout a season are naturally disposed toward voting for him. The Pitcher of the Year Award is given annually to the pitcher in each league judged by Sporting News baseball experts as having had the most outstanding season making it one of the oldest and most prestigious pitching award in Major League Baseball.

A brand new baseball.

A prep player is a draft prospect who is still in high school. E.g., "Nationals select prep right-hander Lucas Giolito 16th overall."

The Rawlings Gold Glove Award, usually referred to as the Gold Glove, is the award given annually to the Major League Baseball players judged to have exhibited superior individual fielding performances at each fielding position in both the National League (NL) and the American League (AL), as voted by the managers and coaches in each league. Managers are not permitted to vote for their own players. Eighteen Gold Gloves are awarded each year (with the exception of 1957, 1985 and 2007), one at each of the nine positions in each league. In 1957, the baseball glove manufacturer Rawlings created the Gold Glove Award to commemorate the best fielding performance at each position. The award was created from a glove made from gold lamé-tanned leather and affixed to a walnut base. Initially, only one Gold Glove per position was awarded to the top fielder at each position in the entire league; however, separate awards were given for the National and American Leagues beginning in 1958.

Greg Maddux has won the most Gold Glove Awards among all players, including pitchers, in Major League Baseball history. He won 18 awards, all in the National League; his streak of wins was consecutive from 1990 through 2002 until interrupted by Mike Hampton in 2003. Maddux won five more awards from 2004 to 2008, after which he retired. Jim Kaat is second and held the record for most wins (16) until he was displaced by Maddux in 2007. He won 14 awards in the American League and 2 in the National League; his 16 consecutive awards is a record among winners. Bob Gibson won nine Gold Gloves with the St. Louis Cardinals, and the inaugural winner Bobby Shantz won four awards in each league, for a total of eight. Mark Langston and Mike Mussina are tied for the fifth-highest total, with seven wins each. Five-time awardees include Ron Guidry, Phil Niekro, and Kenny Rogers; Jim Palmer won four times. Gold Glove winners at pitcher who have been inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame include Gibson, Palmer, and Niekro.

Pitcher is a town in Chenango County, New York, United States. The population was 803 at the 2010 census. The town is named after Nathaniel Pitcher, a Lt. Governor of New York.

The Town of Pitcher is on the west border of Chenango County, west of the City of Norwich.

The Silver Slugger Award is awarded annually to the best offensive player at each position in both the American League (AL) and the National League (NL), as determined by the coaches and managers of Major League Baseball (MLB). These voters consider several offensive categories in selecting the winners, including batting average, slugging percentage, and on-base percentage, in addition to "coaches' and managers' general impressions of a player's overall offensive value". Managers and coaches are not permitted to vote for players on their own team. The Silver Slugger was first awarded in 1980 and is given by Hillerich & Bradsby, the manufacturer of Louisville Slugger bats. The award is a bat-shaped trophy, 3 feet (91 cm) tall, engraved with the names of each of the winners from the league and plated with sterling silver.

Only National League pitchers receive a Silver Slugger Award; lineups in the American League include the designated hitter, who replaces the pitcher in the batting order, so the designated hitter receives the award instead. Mike Hampton has won the most Silver Sluggers as a pitcher, earning five consecutive awards with four different teams from 1999 to 2003. Tom Glavine is a four-time winner (1991, 1995–1996, 1998) with the Atlanta Braves. Rick Rhoden (1984–1986), Don Robinson (1982, 1989–1990), and Carlos Zambrano (2006, 2008–2009) each own three Silver Sluggers. Two-time winners include the inaugural winner, Bob Forsch (1980, 1987), and Fernando Valenzuela (1981, 1983), who won the Cy Young Award, the Rookie of the Year Award, and the Silver Slugger in his first full major league season. The most recent winner is Zack Greinke.

Braves
Atlanta Braves

              

The Atlanta Braves are a Major League Baseball (MLB) team in Atlanta, Georgia, playing in the Eastern Division of the National League. The Braves have played home games at Turner Field since 1997 and play spring training games in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. In 2017, the team is to move to a new $672 million stadium complex in the Cumberland highrise district of Cobb County just north of the I-285 bypass.


2012 Atlanta Braves season

The 2012 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 16th season of home games at Turner Field, 47th season in Atlanta, and 137th season of the franchise. After a late season collapse in 2011 kept the Braves from the playoffs, the team returned to the postseason for the second time in three seasons as a Wild Card team, with a record of 94-68. They lost to the St. Louis Cardinals in the one-game Wild Card Playoff.

Following the conclusion of the 2011 season, Braves general manager Frank Wren highlighted several important areas to improve during the offseason. Since most players were committed contractually to the team in 2012, Wren acknowledged that he would likely make few major changes. One spot that was mentioned for a major overhaul was the shortstop position, where Alex González had played since the Yunel Escobar trade with Toronto in July 2010. González entered the offseason as a free agent and proved too expensive for the team. Wren ultimately allowed prospect Tyler Pastornicky the starting duties in 2012, until he was replaced by Andrelton Simmons in mid-June. When Simmons was hurt in July, Jack Wilson, Paul Janish, and Martín Prado filled in for him. While center fielder Michael Bourn returned to his position in 2012, Wren also suggested that the corner outfield positions were areas of contention. In 2011, the Atlanta outfielders finished the season last in the National League in on-base plus slugging and slugging percentage. Wren stated that right fielder Jason Heyward and left fielder Martín Prado had no guarantee of getting the starting jobs in 2012. On the day after the Braves were eliminated from the playoffs in 2011, Wren said that veteran starter Derek Lowe was unlikely to have a spot in the starting rotation in 2012, due his poor performance in 2011 and a plethora of rookie pitching talent in the Braves farm system. With Lowe guaranteed $15 million in 2012, Wren projected that any of Lowe's salary picked up by another team would significantly assist his efforts to find a shortstop or outfielder. By the end of October, Lowe was traded to the Indians.

The 1992 Atlanta Braves season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Braves finishing first in the National League West with a record of 98 wins and 64 losses, clinching their second straight division title.

In the National League Championship Series, the Braves defeated the Pittsburgh Pirates in seven games. In the World Series, Atlanta faced the Toronto Blue Jays, who were making their first appearance in the World Series. However, the Blue Jays won in six games, becoming the first non-U.S.-based team to win a World Series.


2013 Atlanta Braves season

The 2013 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 17th season of home games at Turner Field, 48th season in Atlanta, and 138th season of the franchise.

The Braves won their first game of the season (7–5) against the Philadelphia Phillies on April 1. They finished the season 96-66 and first place in the National League East, but lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in the Division Series.

The 1993 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 128th in existence and their 28th since moving to Atlanta. The Braves were looking to improve on their 98-64 record from 1992 and win the National League pennant for a third consecutive year.

The Braves finished the season with a 104-58 record to win the National League West for the third consecutive year after trailing the San Francisco Giants, who finished in second place by one game, for most of the season in what is generally regarded as last real pennant race before playoff expansion. 1993 was also the last year that the team competed in the National League West, as they would shift to the National League East for 1994.

The 1998 Atlanta Braves season marked the franchise's 33rd season in Atlanta. They would go on to win their seventh consecutive division title, taking the National League East title by 18 games over the second place New York Mets.

The team featured six all stars: shortstop Walt Weiss and third baseman Chipper Jones were voted as starters, while first baseman Andres Galarraga, catcher Javy Lopez, and pitchers Tom Glavine and Greg Maddux were selected as reserves.


2009 Atlanta Braves season

The 2009 Atlanta Braves season featured the Braves' attempt to reclaim a postseason berth for the first time since 2005. The Braves were once again skippered by Bobby Cox, then in his 24th season managing the team. It was the Braves' 44th season in Atlanta, and the 138th season overall for the franchise.


2011 Atlanta Braves season

The 2011 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 46th season in Atlanta, and the 136th of the franchise. For the first time since the 1990 season, Bobby Cox did not manage the club, having retired following the 2010 season. He was succeeded by Fredi González, the former third-base coach for the Braves between 2003 and 2006. After entering the playoffs with their first franchise Wild Card berth in 2010, the Braves attempted to return to the postseason for a second consecutive season. Entering the final month of the regular season with a record of 80–55 and an 8 1⁄2-game lead in the Wild Card standings, the Braves went 9–18 in September to finish the season with a record of 89–73. This September collapse caused the team to fall one game behind the St. Louis Cardinals in the Wild Card race after the final scheduled game of the season, which consequently eliminated them from postseason contention.

Names highlighted in bold appear in table above.


2008 Atlanta Braves season

The 2008 Atlanta Braves season featured the team's attempt to reclaim a postseason berth for the first time since 2005. During the 2008 season, the Braves were once again skippered by Bobby Cox, now in his 19th season (of his second stint) managing Atlanta. As a result of John Schuerholz taking the position of team president, the Braves entered the offseason with Frank Wren as their general manager.

The team wore a patch on the right sleeve "BEACH" in honor of former Braves player and bench coach Jim Beauchamp.


2006 Atlanta Braves season

The 2006 Atlanta Braves season was the Braves' 135th for the franchise and 41st in Atlanta. During the season, the Braves attempted to win the NL East.

Finishing with a 79–83 record, not only did the Braves miss the playoffs for the first time since 1990 (not counting the strike-affected 1994 season), but also their first losing season and worst record since that year.

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