Question:

What part of a microscope do you place a slide for viewing?

Answer:

You place the slide on the microscope's stage. AnswerParty!

More Info:

Microbiology
Laboratory glassware

Laboratory glassware refers to a variety of equipment, traditionally made of glass, used for scientific experiments and other work in science, especially in chemistry and biology laboratories.

Microscopes Slide Microscope
Microscope slide

A microscope slide is a thin flat piece of glass, typically 75 by 25 mm (3 by 1 inches) and about 1 mm thick, used to hold objects for examination under a microscope. Typically the object is placed or secured ("mounted") on the slide, and then both are inserted together in the microscope for viewing. This arrangement allows several slide-mounted objects to be quickly inserted and removed from the microscope, labeled, transported, and stored in appropriate slide cases or folders.

Microscope slides are often used together with a cover slip or cover glass, a smaller and thinner sheet of glass that is placed over the specimen. Slides are held in place on the microscope's stage by slide clips, slide clamps or a cross-table which is used to achieve precise, remote movement of the slide upon the microscope's stage (such as in an automated / computer operated system, or where touching the slide with fingers is inappropriate either due to the risk of contamination or lack of precision)


Cover slip

A cover slip, coverslip or cover glass is a thin flat piece of transparent material, usually square or rectangular, about 20 mm (4/5 in) wide and a fraction of a millimetre thick, that is placed over objects for viewing with a microscope. The object is usually held between the cover slip and a somewhat thicker microscope slide, which rests on the microscope's stage or slide holder and provides the physical support for the object and slip.

The main function of the cover slip is to keep solid specimens pressed flat, and liquid samples shaped into a flat layer of even thickness. This is necessary because high-resolution microscopes have a very narrow region within which they focus.


Optical mineralogy

Optical mineralogy is the study of minerals and rocks by measuring their optical properties. Most commonly, rock and mineral samples are prepared as thin sections or grain mounts for study in the laboratory with a petrographic microscope. Optical mineralogy is used to identify the mineralogical composition of geological materials in order to help reveal their origin and evolution.

Some of the properties and techniques used include:

Lenses Hospitality Recreation Microscopy
Laboratory equipment

A laboratory (/ləˈbɒrətəri/ or /ˈlæbərətri/; informally, lab) is a facility that provides controlled conditions in which scientific or technological research, experiments, and measurement may be performed.

Labs used for scientific research take many forms because of the differing requirements of specialists in the various fields of science. A physics lab might contain a particle accelerator or vacuum chamber, while a metallurgy lab could have apparatus for casting or refining metals or for testing their strength. A chemist or biologist might use a wet laboratory, while a psychologist's lab might be a room with one-way mirrors and hidden cameras in which to observe behavior. In some laboratories, such as those commonly used by computer scientists, computers (sometimes supercomputers) are used for either simulations or the analysis of data collected elsewhere. Scientists in other fields will use still other types of laboratories. Engineers use labs as well.

Optics Hospitality Recreation
News:


Related Websites:


Terms of service | About
7