Question:

What kind of gas can instantly freeze you?

Answer:

Nitrogen, which is usually a gas, in its liquid form is between -346°F and -320.44°F. This can freeze most substances instantly.

More Info:

Chemistry Matter Nitrogen Nonmetals Pnictogens
Unit operations

In chemical engineering and related fields, a unit operation is a basic step in a process. Unit operations involve bringing a physical change such as separation, crystallization, evaporation, filtration etc. For example, in milk processing, homogenization, pasteurization, chilling, and packaging are each unit operations which are connected to create the overall process. A process may have many unit operations to obtain the desired product.

Historically, the different chemical industries were regarded as different industrial processes and with different principles. Arthur Dehon Little propounded the concept of "unit operations" to explain industrial chemistry processes in 1916. In 1923, William H.Walker, Warren K. Lewis and William H. McAdams wrote the book The Principles of Chemical Engineering and explained the variety of chemical industries have processes which follow the same physical laws. They summed-up these similar processes into unit operations. Each unit operation follows the same physical laws and may be used in all chemical industries. The unit operations form the fundamental principles of chemical engineering.

Freeze-drying
Liquid air

Liquid air is air that has been cooled to very low temperatures (cryogenic temperatures), so that it has condensed into a pale blue mobile liquid. To protect it from room temperature, it must be kept in a vacuum insulated flask. Liquid air can absorb heat rapidly and revert to its gaseous state. It is often used for condensing other substances into liquid and/or solidifying them, and as an industrial source of nitrogen, oxygen, argon, and other inert gases through a process called air separation. Liquid air is also replacing liquid nitrogen for theatrical smoke and fog effects.

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