Question:

What is the song with the lyrics 'don't look back yesterdays gone I hear voices'?

Answer:

Those lyrics are from the song Voices by Russ Ballard. Chorus: Don't look back, look straight ahead, don't turn away, then the voice it said Don't look back, yesterday's gone, don't turn away, you can take it on.

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Clifford Grey (5 January 1887 – 25 September 1941) was an English songwriter, actor, librettist and Olympic medalist. His birth name was Percival Davis, and he was also known as Clifford Gray, Tippi Gray, Tippi Grey, Tippy Gray and Tippy Grey. As a writer, Grey contributed prolifically to West End and Broadway shows, as librettist and lyricist for composers including Ivor Novello, Jerome Kern, Howard Talbot, Ivan Caryll and George Gershwin. Among his best-remembered songs are two from early in his career, in 1916: "If You Were The Only Girl in the World" and "Another Little Drink Wouldn’t Do Us Any Harm". His later hits include "Spread a Little Happiness". Unbeknown to his family and professional colleagues, Grey competed as an American bobsleigher, under a different name, in two Winter Olympics, in 1928 and 1932, winning gold medals. Although the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and other sources conclude that the songwriter was the same person as the athlete, some sources disagree. Grey was born in Birmingham, Warwickshire, the son of George Davis, a whip manufacturer, and his wife Emma, née Lowe. He was educated at the King Edward VI School. On leaving school in 1903 he had a variety of office jobs, in none of which he had any success. He became a pierrot with a local concert party, and adopted the stage name Clifford Grey. By the time he married in 1912, he had largely given up performing in favour of writing lyrics for West End shows. His wife was Dorothy Maud Mary Gould (1890 or 1891–1940), a fellow member of the concert party. They had two daughters; Grey also adopted Gould's daughter. Their marriage lasted until Dorothy's death. In 1916 Grey collaborated with the American composer Nat Ayer on The Bing Boys Are Here, a long-running revue that opened in London in April, and contained two of Grey’s early successes, "If You Were The Only Girl in the World" and "Another Little Drink Wouldn"t Do Us Any Harm". He collaborated with Ayer on Pell-Mell, The Bing Girls Are There, The Other Bing Boys, The Bing Brothers On Broadway, and Yes, Uncle! and with Herman Finck in Hullo, America!, Ivor Novello and Jerome Kern in Theodore & Co, Howard Talbot and Novello in Who’s Hooper?, and Ivan Caryll in Kissing Time. On the last show he collaborated with P.G. Wodehouse, who was privately lukewarm about Grey's talent, regarding him as a specialist in adapting other people's work rather than as an original talent. At the same time, he acted in several silent films, including The Weakness of Strength (1916). In 1920, Grey was invited to New York City by Kern to renew their collaboration, writing Florenz Ziegfeld’s Sally. Grey remained in the U.S. for most of the decade, with occasional sorties back to London for Phi-Phi with Henri Christiné (1922), The Smith Family with Ayer (1922), and The Rainbow with George Gershwin (1923). For Broadway, he provided a regular stream of lyrics – and some libretti – for musical comedies and revues. His collaborators included Sigmund Romberg and Melville Gideon on some of the less-remembered shows, and Vincent Youmans on Hit The Deck (1927) and Rudolph Friml and Wodehouse on The Three Musketeers (1928). In 1928, Grey secretly took up top-level bobsleighing (see below). The introduction of talking pictures attracted Grey to Hollywood. He collaborated with Victor Schertzinger on the 1929 Maurice Chevalier and Jeanette MacDonald film, The Love Parade, and with Oscar Straus on The Smiling Lieutenant (1931), and contributed to films with a range of stars from Ramon Novarro to Lawrence Tibbett to Marion Davies. His songs and lyrics from show were used in many films, and he wrote screenplays and lyrics for fourteen new Hollywood films between 1929 and 1931, including The Vagabond Lover (1929), In Gay Madrid (1930) and The Smiling Lieutenant (1931). Even after his death, Grey's songs continued to be used in films and television productions. His best known song, "If You Were the Only Girl (in the World)", appeared in such films as Lilacs in the Spring (1954), The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) and The Cat's Meow (2001), and some films, such as Hit the Deck (1955), were adaptations of his shows. In 1929, he returned temporarily to London, where he collaborated with Vivian Ellis on Mr Cinders, which had a long run, and featured one of Grey's best-remembered songs, "Spread a Little Happiness". The Oxford Dictionary of National Biography writes, of this aspect of Grey's life, that during his New York years: As "Tippi Gray", Grey competed for the United States in bobsleigh, winning a gold medal in the five-man event at the 1928 Winter Olympics in St. Moritz. He then followed up with a gold medal at the following Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, this time in the four-man event. He also won a bronze medal in the four-man event at the 1937 FIBT World Championships in St. Moritz. While winning all these medals for the Americans, Grey retained his British citizenship. Grey's children did not find out about his gold medals until after his death. Returning to England in 1932, although apparently spending time in California, Grey concentrated thereafter on the West End stage and British films. His screenplay for Rome Express (1932), a spy story, was "extremely popular in its day and virtually created a sub-genre." He wrote more than twenty screenplays for British films, usually for the popular comedians of the day, but also including My Song Goes Round the World (1934), Mimi (1935), an adaptation of La Bohème, for Gertrude Lawrence and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. and Yes, Madam? (1940). Throughout the decade, Grey had shows running in the West End, written in collaboration with previous collaborators and new ones including Oscar Levant, Johnny Green and Noel Gay. Grey wrote over 3,000 songs. When World War II began, Grey joined the Entertainments National Service Association (ENSA), which took shows round the country and overseas to provide relief for serving members of the armed forces. In 1941 he was presenting a concert party in Ipswich, Suffolk, when the town was heavily bombed. Grey died two days later, aged 54, as a result of a heart attack, brought on by the bombing, and exacerbated by asthma.
"That Was Yesterday" was the second single taken from the album Agent Provocateur by the band Foreigner. This song was available in four versions, as a remixed single, a very popular extended remix, an orchestral version, and the original mix. The song was written by Lou Gramm and Mick Jones, and the B-side "Two Different Worlds" is also of note for being the first solo-written Lou Gramm song to appear on a single. The single reached number 12 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also reached #4 on the Billboard Mainstream Rock chart and #24 on the Adult Contemporary chart. It also reached the Top 40 in the UK (#28), the Netherlands (#19), Switzerland (#29) and Germany (#31). The extended remix added additional lyrics in its intro, and these lyrics can be heard in the live version from the DVD All Access Tonight - 25 - Live In Concert. The video was filmed at the Birmingham Jefferson Civic Center in Birmingham, Alabama. Allmusic critic Bret Adams called the song "a terrific hit single," citing its "catchy chorus" and "nifty synthesizer lick."
"So Yesterday" is a song recorded by American pop rock singer Hilary Duff. The song was written by Lauren Christy, Scott Spock, Graham Edwards, and Charlie Midnight, and produced by The Matrix for Duff's second studio album, Metamorphosis (2003). The song draws influences from pop rock music, and the lyrics chronicle the protagonist getting over a breakup with her boyfriend, declaring him as "so yesterday". The song received mixed reviews from music critics, with some of them noting its close similarity to Avril Lavigne's works, while others named it one of Duff's best songs ever. "So Yesterday" premiered on AOL Music's "First Listen" on June 27, 2003. It was later released to United States Top 40 radios on July 15, 2003. The song was officially released on July 29, 2003 as the album's lead single. It became Duff's first single to chart in the US Hot 100Billboard, reaching number forty-two. It was moderately successful outside the US, reaching top forty in most countries it charted. The song reached number eight in Australia and was certified platinum by Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA). The song was accompanied by a music video, directed by Chris Applebaum, which showed Duff playing a prank on her ex-boyfriend. It was successful on various music video channels like MTV and MuchMusic. Duff performed the song on her Metamorphosis Tour and has since performed it on all her concert tours. The song is also featured on the compilations Most Wanted (2005), 4ever (2006) and Best of Hilary Duff (2008), and the music video game Band Hero. Although Duff recorded songs like "I Can't Wait", "Why Not" and "What Dreams Are Made Of", which received substantial airplay on Radio Disney, executives at Buena Vista Music Group, Duff's record label, planned to help her reach a more mature audience. So, Andre Recke, an executive at Buena Vista, along with Duff and her mother, enlisted the songwriting and production team "The Matrix" (consisting of Lauren Christy, Scott Spock and Graham Edwards) to produce songs for Duff's debut album Metamorphosis (2003). "So Yesterday" became one of three songs produced by the team for the album, and was the last song recorded for the album. Duff herself has said that when she first heard the song, she did not really like it; however, her opinion changed after she listened to it more often. She then decided she would give the song a "100 percent" and not comment negatively of it. According to her, she "ended up loving it", stating, "It was such a fun song, and it means a lot." Bob Cavallo, chairman of Buena Vista Records, said that the song was "more mature than the past work that she's done." "So Yesterday" premiered on AOL Music's "First Listen" on June 27, 2003, and it drew over 500,000 streams in two days. It was released to US Top 40 radios on July 15, and was the "most added" song on the format in its first two weeks of release. The song is featured on all of Duff's compilations album, including Most Wanted (2005), 4ever (2006) and her greatest hits album, Best of Hilary Duff (2008). It is also featured on the music video game Band Hero as a bonus download. Lyrically, the song talks about someone who has got over a broken relationship, declaring the partner as "so yesterday". According to Duff, the song's lyrics are very empowering towards breaking up with someone and getting over it. In a 2006 interview with Instinct, Duff said that people often told her that "So Yesterday" was "the ultimate post-breakup anthem". She said her mother instilled the notion of inner strength in her, and that she wanted the music she makes to be positive. "I don't think there's very much of that out there anymore.", she said. She stressed the importance of strong songs that are not all about how "a boy broke your heart and you're never going to get on your feet again", saying it was good for girls to hear. Musically, "So Yesterday" is moderately paced, with influences of pop and rock music and moves at a tempo of 76 bpm. The song is set in the signature of common time, and is written in the key of majorC. The song has the sequence of Am–G–Fmaj7 as its chord progression. Duff's vocal range in the song spans from the note of 3G♯ to the note of 4B♯. Upon its release, the song received mixed reviews from critics. Stephen Thomas Erlewine of Allmusic gave a positive review and commented that the song sounded natural coming from a teenager like Duff. He also noted the influence of Avril Lavigne on the song. Billboard gave a mixed review, also commenting on Lavigne's influence on the song. Similarly, Spence D. of IGN Music was mixed in his review stating, "[it's] like bubblegum ice cream: smooth and sweet at first listen, but the flavor eventually wears off, leaving somewhat generic pop anthems that will most likely be forgotten by the aforementioned throngs of young girl worshippers as they age along with Duff." While reviewing Duff's compilation Most Wanted, Talia Kraines of BBC Music commented that the song was Duff's best. Similarly, Sal Cinquemani of Slant Magazine, noted the track as "kind of cute." Elysa Gardner of USA Today gave a negative review on the song's title writing, "[That] song title may, unfortunately, prove prophetic for an artist who seems so content to merely ride the wave of the moment" "So Yesterday" debuted on the Billboard Hot 100 chart at number fifty-three in the thirty-third week of 2003, and peaked at number forty-two in its eleventh week. It spent twenty weeks on the Hot 100. The song topped the US Hot 100 Singles SalesBillboard chart, making Duff the first artist in four months not affiliated with American Idol, to top the chart. The song peaked at number two in Canadian Singles Chart. In Australia the song debuted at number thirty-nine, peaked at number eight in its eighth week, and remained on the chart for twenty weeks. It was the forty-ninth best selling single of 2003 in Australia, and was certified platinum in 2004. In Japan, the song reached number 199 on the Oricon weekly charts. In United Kingdom, the song debuted at number nine on the UK Singles Chart. The song peaked in the top ten on the charts in other European countries such as the Netherlands and France. The music video premiered on MTV on July 24, 2003. It was directed by Chris Applebaum. It was also featured on MTV's Making the Video two days after the video's premiere on July 26, 2003. According to Disney Music Group chairman Bob Cavallo, care was taken to see that the video would not be offensive to Duff's young fans and parents, but would work for MTV. In the video, Duff's plays a break-up prank on her aloof boyfriend. While he is at the beach, she steals his clothes, including an orange t-shirt that reads "Everything is bigger in Texas!". She spends several days taking snapshots of strangers wearing the t-shirt and anonymously sneaking them into his mailbox. His bewilderment turns to dismay when he receives the final package returning the garment along with a picture of Duff smiling, looking back, and wearing a shirt that declares, "you're so yesterday". Throughout the whole video, Duff is shown performing the song with her band. The music video ranked at number one on Total Request Live. It was a staple on the UK incarnation of Total Request Live, reaching a peak of #4. In late August 2003 it was the most streamed music video on AOL. "So Yesterday" was performed at the 31st American Music Award in November 2003. The song was also performed at the British chart program Top of the Pops in 2003. Duff performed an acoustic version of the song at Sessions@AOL and Studio Disney. Apart from the live television performances, the song was performed on many of Duff's tours. "So Yesterday" was performed on every show on her Metamorphosis Tour (2003). The live acoustic performance at Sessions@AOL was taped and is featured on Duff's video compilation All Access Pass, and the performance at the Metamorphosis tour is featured on Duff's live video compilation The Girl Can Rock. Source
Otto Abels Harbach, born Otto Abels Hauerbach (August 18, 1873 – January 24, 1963) was an American lyricist and librettist of about 50 musical comedies. He is most remembered for being Oscar Hammerstein II's mentor and was one of the first librettists to believe that songs should be woven into a show, not just placed there. He is also considered one of the first great lyricists, because most of the others were considered hacks. This was because the shows usually didn't care about lyrics, just the music, the costumes, and the stars. Some of his more famous lyrics are for "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes", "Indian Love Call" and "Cuddle up a Little Closer, Lovey Mine". Harbach was born in Salt Lake City, Utah to Danish immigrant parents Adolph Christiansen and his wife Sena Olsen. His parents changed their name when they immigrated to the United States, and took the name of the farm they worked on (common practice at the time), and their new last name was Hauerbach. He attended the Salt Lake Collegiate Institute, transferring to Knox College, in Galesburg, Illinois, where he was a friend of Carl Sandburg, joined Phi Gamma Delta fraternity, and graduated in 1895. He obtained his masters degree in English from Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and attended Columbia University in New York with the goal of becoming an English professor. In the early 1900s, complaining of eye difficulties making prolonged reading uncomfortable, he became a newspaper reporter. He also worked at various advertising agencies. He also worked as at an insurance firm, copywriter in advertising, and later as a journalist. He would have to pull out of Columbia when he could not financially support himself. In 1902, he spotted an advertisement with a picture of Fay Templeton for a new Joe Weber and Lew Fields musical. He had not been interested in theatre but more in literary classics, but after seeing the show, realized he liked the lighthearted genre. In the same year, he met Karl Hoschna. They wrote a comic opera together, but no producer would pick it up, so they wrote songs to put in other Broadway shows. Isidore Witmark then contacted Hoschna, his employee, and told him he wanted to turn Mary Pacheco's play Incog into a musical. Hoschna then contacted Harbach, and so began the partnership. The result, with Whitmark and Charles Dickson writing the libretto, was Three Twins, which opened in 1908 and ran for 288 performances (Harbach was paid a hundred dollars for his work). The show starred Clifton Crawford. Their next collaboration was Madame Sherry in 1910, adapting a 1902 German operetta with Jack Gardner in the lead role. The show featured a song that was not theirs: the Albert von Tilzer and Junie McCree song Put Your Arms Around Me, Honey was put into the score because it was popular. They would colloborate for four more shows until Hoschna died in 1911, at the young age of thirty four. After working with Hoschna, his works had given somewhat of a name for himself. Arthur Hammerstein asked Harbach in 1912 to write the lyrics to an operetta with Rudolf Friml, called The Firefly. Victor Herbert was originally supposed to write the music, but he refused to work with the star of the show Emma Trentini because in his last show, she refused to sing a song for the encore, and Herbert walked out refusing to ever work with her again. Hammerstein could not find anyone as talented as Herbert, but settled on the unknown Friml because of his classical training. The result was a huge success, and it would spell eleven more musicals, including High Jinks (1913) (which featured the song "All Aboard Dixieland" by Jack Yellen and George L. Cobb) and Katinka(1915). Most of the shows they wrote together ran for over 200 performances. In 1914, he contributed the libretto only to the Percy Wenrich musical The Crinoline Girl. In 1917, he shortened his name from Hauerbach to Harbach to avoid anti-German sentiment caused by World War I. He would also work with composer Louis Hirsch during this time, and would score his biggest success so far in 1917 with Going Up. This was his first attempt at a musical comedy, as opposed to an American operetta. The show was based on the 1910 comedy by James Montgomery, who co-wrote the libretto with Harbach. The show ran for 351 performances, toured nationally, and was an even larger hit in London. He collaborated as lyricist or librettist with Oscar Hammerstein II, Jerome Kern, Louis Hirsch, Herbert Stothart, Vincent Youmans, George Gershwin, and Sigmund Romberg. He was a charter member of ASCAP in 1914, serving as its director (1920–1963), vice president (1936–1940), and finally president (1950–1953). Harbach was also an inductee of the Songwriter's Hall of Fame. He died in New York City. He was lyricist for many songs now in the standard repertoire, including:
"Yesterdays" is a 1933 song composed by Jerome Kern, with a lyric by Otto Harbach. It was written for the show Roberta (1933), where it was introduced by Irene Dunne. Barbra Streisand performed the song in her TV special Color Me Barbra and included a recording on her album Color Me Barbra (1966). Marianne Faithfull recorded it on her 1987 album Strange Weather.
Russell Glyn Ballard (born 31 October 1945, Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire, England) is an English singer, songwriter and musician. Ballard (ex Rick Nicholl and the Rebels) was initially a guitarist (Hofner Club 60), appearing stage left, with Buster Meikle & The Day Breakers in 1961, together with Roy Ballard, Russ's older brother on piano playing behind him, Bernie Benson on bass to the right and Bob Henrit on drums. After a stint with The Roulettes, backing Adam Faith, he then went on to join Unit 4 + 2 in the early 1960s, before becoming the lead singer and guitarist of Argent (along with Henrit, who joined as drummer), writing their hit "God Gave Rock and Roll to You", which would later be covered by both Petra and Kiss. Ballard is most well known as the vocalist on Argent's smash "Hold Your Head Up". In 1972, Ballard performed on Colin Blunstone's album Ennismore, which was produced by Chris White. Ballard also wrote the hit single, "I Don't Believe in Miracles", which featured on that album. He left Argent in 1974 and pursued a solo and songwriting career. He wrote such hits as Three Dog Night's "Liar," originally recorded by Argent, Hot Chocolate's 1977 UK chart topper "So You Win Again", and Rainbow's 1979 hit "Since You Been Gone." Head East recorded the song first in 1978 for its self-titled album. The song also is featured on Ballard's second solo album Winning. He also wrote Rainbow's 1981 #3 (UK) hit "I Surrender". Ballard also wrote and performed on Roger Daltrey's first two solo albums - Daltrey (1973) and Ride a Rock Horse (1975). Daltrey recorded some other Russ Ballard originals for his McVicar soundtrack, and his Under a Raging Moon and Can't Wait to See the Movie, albums. He did a tour with Roger Daltrey in 1985, playing guitar and even singing one of his own songs. British pop band Hello recorded Ballard's "New York Groove" in 1975, reaching #7 in Germany and #9 in the UK. "New York Groove" would also be recorded three years later by Ace Frehley, who turned the tune into a stateside hit. Ballard also wrote the #17, 1981 hit for Santana, called "Winning", which appeared on their album entitled Zebop! and had previously been released by Ballard himself on his second solo album. Ballard wrote and produced "You Can Do Magic" for the group America on its 1982 album View from the Ground. The single climbed to #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in October 1982, and helped resurrect the band's career. The following year, America brought in Ballard to produce their follow-up album, Your Move. One of its tracks, "The Border", which was co-written by Ballard with Dewey Bunnell, reached #33 on the Billboard Hot 100. Ballard wrote ABBA singer Anni-Frid Lyngstad's 1982 solo hit: "I Know There's Something Going On" (which was produced and featured drums played by Phil Collins). The track reached #13 on the Billboard Hot 100. He also penned "Can't Shake Loose" for fellow ABBA former member, Agnetha Fältskog, which peaked at #29 in the same listings. In 1991 the song he co-wrote with John Waite and Jonathan Cain, "So This Is Eden", appeared on Bad English's album, Backlash. Ballard has also written and produced for Elkie Brooks, and more recently][, acting as a talent scout, he "discovered" Lauren Harris. As a solo artist, Ballard charted once on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart, when "On the Rebound" reached #58 in 1980. Progressive rock band Uriah Heep covered "On the Rebound" in 1982 on their album, Abominog. Another notable solo hit, "Voices" - from his second self-titled album (1984) - was featured in the Miami Vice episode "Calderone's Return: Part 2 - Calderone's Demise," which aired on 26 October 1984. The song was a brief hit on rock radio stations, peaking at #15 on the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. However, "Voices" stalled below the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #110. Another song from the same album, "In The Night" was featured in the episode "Calderone's Return: Part 1 - The Hit List." The show also featured "Your Time Is Gonna Come" by Ballard later in its run. "The Fire Still Burns," the title track of his 1985 album attained #15 on the Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks chart. In addition to Kiss covering "God Gave Rock and Roll to You", retitled as "God Gave Rock 'n' Roll to You II":
Edward Eliscu (April 2, 1902 – June 18, 1998) was a lyricist, playwright, producer and actor. Eliscu was born in New York City. He attended Dewitt Clinton High School in New York City (as a classmate of Director George Cukor), and the City College of New York where he attained a Bachelor of Science degree. He then began acting in Broadway plays. Eliscu's first film score was with Vincent Youmans and Billy Rose for the film Great Day. He was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1975. He died, aged 96, in Newtown, Connecticut.
Don't look back

Russell Glyn Ballard (born 31 October 1945, Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire, England) is an English singer, songwriter and musician.

Ballard (ex Rick Nicholl and the Rebels) was initially a guitarist (Hofner Club 60), appearing stage left, with Buster Meikle & The Day Breakers in 1961, together with Roy Ballard, Russ's older brother on piano playing behind him, Bernie Benson on bass to the right and Bob Henrit on drums. After a stint with The Roulettes, backing Adam Faith, he then went on to join Unit 4 + 2 in the early 1960s, before becoming the lead singer and guitarist of Argent (along with Henrit, who joined as drummer), writing their hit "God Gave Rock and Roll to You", which would later be covered by both Petra and Kiss. Ballard is most well known as the vocalist on Argent's smash "Hold Your Head Up". In 1972, Ballard performed on Colin Blunstone's album Ennismore, which was produced by Chris White. Ballard also wrote the hit single, "I Don't Believe in Miracles", which featured on that album.

Don't look back

1. People who identify of full or partial British ancestry born into that country.

2. British-born people who identify of British ancestry only.
3. British citizens by way of residency in the British overseas territories; however, not all have ancestry from the United Kingdom.
4. British citizens or nationals.

Don't Look Back

Russell Glyn Ballard (born 31 October 1945, Waltham Cross, Hertfordshire, England) is an English singer, songwriter and musician.

Ballard (ex Rick Nicholl and the Rebels) was initially a guitarist (Hofner Club 60), appearing stage left, with Buster Meikle & The Day Breakers in 1961, together with Roy Ballard, Russ's older brother on piano playing behind him, Bernie Benson on bass to the right and Bob Henrit on drums. After a stint with The Roulettes, backing Adam Faith, he then went on to join Unit 4 + 2 in the early 1960s, before becoming the lead singer and guitarist of Argent (along with Henrit, who joined as drummer), writing their hit "God Gave Rock and Roll to You", which would later be covered by both Petra and Kiss. Ballard is most well known as the vocalist on Argent's smash "Hold Your Head Up". In 1972, Ballard performed on Colin Blunstone's album Ennismore, which was produced by Chris White. Ballard also wrote the hit single, "I Don't Believe in Miracles", which featured on that album.

2nd row: Elizabeth I of England • Bobby Moore • Margaret Thatcher • David Beckham • Harold Godwinson • Kate Winslet • Charles Dickens

The English are a nation and ethnic group native to England, who speak English. The English identity is of early mediaeval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn. England is a country of the United Kingdom, and English people in England are British Citizens. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain after the fifth century AD.

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