Question:

What is the smallest town in Yavapai County AZ?

Answer:

Jerome has 329 of the 227,348 people in Yavapai County. Yavapai County originally encompassed more than 65,000 square miles and now covers only 8,125 square miles.

More Info:

Yavapai County is located near the center of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population 211,073. The county seat is Prescott. The largest incorporated city is Peoria though virtually all of Peoria’s current population is within Maricopa County.

Yavapai County is located near the center of the U.S. state of Arizona. As of the 2010 census, its population 211,073. The county seat is Prescott. The largest incorporated city is Peoria though virtually all of Peoria’s current population is within Maricopa County.

Yavapai are an indigenous people in Arizona. Historically, the Yavapai were divided into four geographical bands that considered themselves separate peoples: the Ɖo:lkabaya, or Western Yavapai, the Yavbe', or Northwestern Yavapai, the Guwevkabaya, or Southeastern Yavapai, and Wi:pukba, or Northeastern Yavapai - Verde Valley Yavapai. Another Yavapai band was the Mađqwadabaya or "Desert People" and is believed to have mixed with the Mojave people and Quechan people and no longer exists. Several Mohave and Quechan families trace their family history to Yavapai roots. The Yavapai have much in common with their linguistic relatives to the north, the Havasupai, the Hualapai. Often Yavapai were mistaken as Apache by American settlers, variously being referred to as "Mohave-Apache", "Yuma-Apache" or "Tonto-Apache". Before the 1860s, when settlers began exploring for gold in the area, the Yavapai occupied an area of approximately 20,000 mi² (51800 km²) bordering the San Francisco Peaks to the north, the Pinaleno Mountains and Mazatzal Mountains on the southeast, and the Colorado River to the west, and almost to the Gila River and the Salt River to the south.

Before being confined to reservations, the Yavapai were mainly hunter-gatherers, following an annual round, migrating to different areas to follow the ripening of different edible plants, although some tribes supplemented this with small scale cultivation of the "three sisters": (maize, squash, and beans) in fertile streambeds. In particular, the Ɖo:lkabaya, who lived in lands that were less supportive of food gathering, turned to agriculture more than other Yavapai, despite the fact that their land was also less supportive of agriculture. In turn, Ɖo:lkabaya often traded items such as animal skins, baskets, and agave to Quechan groups for food. The main plant foods gathered were walnuts, saguaro fruits, juniper berries, acorns, sunflower seeds, manzanita berries, hackberries, the bulbs of the Quamash, and the greens of the Lamb's quarters, Scrophularia, and Lupinus plants. Agave was the most crucial harvest, being the only plant food available from late fall through early spring. The hearts of the plant were roasted in stone-lined pits, and could be stored for later use. Primary animals hunted were deer, rabbit, jackrabbit, quail, and woodrat. Fish and water-borne birds were eschewed by most Yavapai groups, though some groups of Tolkepaya began eating fish after contact with their Quechan neighbors.

The Fort McDowell Yavapai Nation, formerly the Fort McDowell Mohave-Apache Community of the Fort McDowell Indian Reservation), is a federally recognized tribe and Indian reservation in Maricopa County, Arizona about 23 miles (37 km) northeast of Phoenix, currently encompassing only 24,680 acres (100 km2) out of the much larger area that was originally Yavapai territory. The reservation was originally established in 1890 and is now home to approximately 971 people, mostly Yavapai. The outside communities of Fountain Hills and Rio Verde lie adjacent to the reservation, as does the Salt River Indian Reservation.

Coordinates: 33.64111°N 111.66444°W / 33.64111; -111.66444 / 33°38′28″N 111°39′52″W

Arizona is a landlocked state situated in the southwestern region of the United States of America. Arizona shares land borders with Utah to the north, the Mexican state of Sonora the south, New Mexico to the east, and Nevada to the west. Arizona shares water borders with California and the Mexican state of Baja California to the west along the Colorado River. Arizona is also one of the Four Corners states, at which Arizona touches Colorado.

Arizona has an area of 113,998 square miles (295,253 km2), making it the sixth largest U.S. state. Of Arizona's total area, 0.32% consists of water, which makes Arizona the state with the second lowest percentage of water area (New Mexico is the lowest at 0.19%).

Arizona

Native Americans have inhabited what is now Arizona for thousands of years. In addition, the majority of the Navajo Nation, the largest Native American reservation in the US, and the entire Tohono O'odham Nation, the second largest, are located in Arizona. Over a quarter of the area of the state is reservation land.

Twenty tribes are members of the Inter-Tribal Council of Arizona (ITCA).

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