Question:

What is the religious views of the band Bad Religion?

Answer:

Contrary to popular belief, Bad Religion's Greg Graffin does not identify himself as an atheist, but chooses to identify as a naturalist.The band's bassist Jay Bentley has stated that he has spiritual beliefs. Brett Gurewitz is a "provisional deist."

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Brett W. Gurewitz (born May 12, 1962), nicknamed Mr. Brett, is the guitarist and a songwriter of Bad Religion. He is also the owner of the music label Epitaph Records (which has handled many Bad Religion releases) and sister-labels ANTI-, Burning Heart Records, Fat Possum Records, and Hellcat Records. He has produced albums for Bad Religion as well as Epitaph Records labelmates NOFX, Rancid, and Pennywise, among others. Gurewitz also had a project called Error, which also featured Atticus Ross, Leopold Ross, and Greg Puciato.

Gurewitz joined Bad Religion in 1979 at the age of 17, when he, Greg Graffin, Jay Bentley and Jay Ziskrout agreed to form a band. After releasing two albums and one EP, Gurewitz left Bad Religion in 1983, but rejoined three years later when the How Could Hell Be Any Worse? line-up (adding guitarist Greg Hetson as the second guitarist) was reuniting, and recorded five more albums with the band before they signed to Atlantic Records in 1993. Their Atlantic debut, Stranger Than Fiction (1994), was a breakthrough success, scoring their biggest hits "21st Century (Digital Boy)" and "Infected". However, he was overwhelmed by Epitaph's new popularity (including the unexpected success of the label's then-current acts The Offspring and Rancid) and decided to quit Bad Religion once again in 1994. Gurewitz continued working at Epitaph after his departure from Bad Religion, and released the "Hate You" single in 1996 with his one-off project Daredevils. During that time, he entered a period of drug addiction. By 1999, Gurewitz had successfully completed drug rehabilitation and reconciled with Graffin to co-write a song "Believe It", which appears on Bad Religion's 2000 album The New America. He eventually rejoined the band in 2001 to write and record the album The Process of Belief (2002). He remains with the band today, but only occasionally joins them live, such as when they are performing near his hometown or for televised appearances. Bad Religion has since released four more albums: The Empire Strikes First (2004), New Maps of Hell (2007), The Dissent of Man (2010), and True North (2013).

Gregory Walter Graffin, Ph.D, (born November 6, 1964) is an American punk rock musician, college professor, and author. He is most recognized as the lead vocalist, songwriter, and only constant member of the noted Los Angeles band Bad Religion, which he co-founded in 1979. He also embarked on a solo career in 1997, when he released the album American Lesion. His follow-up album, Cold as the Clay was released nine years later. Graffin obtained his Ph.D. at Cornell University and has lectured courses in life sciences and paleontology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Bad Religion is a punk rock band that formed in Los Angeles in 1979. The band makes extensive use of soaring 3-part vocal harmonies (which they refer to in their album liner notes as the "oozin' aahs"), guitar solos and intellectual lyrics that often contain political or religious commentary. Their lyrics often relate to matters of social responsibility. The band's lineup has changed several times over its lifespan, with lead vocalist Greg Graffin being the only consistent member; the current lineup, however, features three out of four of the band's original members (Graffin, Brett Gurewitz and Jay Bentley). Bad Religion has released seventeen studio albums (one of which is a Christmas album), two live albums, three compilation albums, two EPs, and two DVDs (which were both recorded live). Although they gained a cult following with many of their early albums, Bad Religion did not experience major worldwide commercial success until the 1994 release of their eighth studio album Stranger Than Fiction, which spawned their biggest hits "Infected" and a re-recorded version of "21st Century (Digital Boy)", and was certified gold in both the United States and Canada. Their latest album, True North, was released on January 22, 2013. Bad Religion has sold over 5 million albums worldwide, and along with many of their contemporaries—such as The Offspring, Green Day, Rancid, NOFX and Social Distortion—they are one of the best-selling punk rock acts of all time.

Bad Religion was formed in Los Angeles in 1979 by high school students Greg Graffin, Jay Bentley, Jay Ziskrout, and Brett Gurewitz. According to bassist Jay Bentley, Bad Religion started around November or December 1979, "but no one can remember exactly. Greg Graffin wanted the year 2000 to be Bad Religion's 20th birthday". Their first public performance was playing 6 songs at a Fullerton California warehouse opening for Social Distortion. Their first official show was on November 11, 1980 at Joey Kills Bar in Burbank, California.

Jay Dee Bentley (born on June 6, 1964 in Wichita, Kansas) is the bassist and co-founding member of the punk rock group Bad Religion. He has played with the band through its whole existence with a small break between 1983 and 1985.


Religion

Gregory Walter Graffin, Ph.D, (born November 6, 1964) is an American punk rock musician, college professor, and author. He is most recognized as the lead vocalist, songwriter, and only constant member of the noted Los Angeles band Bad Religion, which he co-founded in 1979. He also embarked on a solo career in 1997, when he released the album American Lesion. His follow-up album, Cold as the Clay was released nine years later. Graffin obtained his Ph.D. at Cornell University and has lectured courses in life sciences and paleontology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Brett W. Gurewitz (born May 12, 1962), nicknamed Mr. Brett, is the guitarist and a songwriter of Bad Religion. He is also the owner of the music label Epitaph Records (which has handled many Bad Religion releases) and sister-labels ANTI-, Burning Heart Records, Fat Possum Records, and Hellcat Records. He has produced albums for Bad Religion as well as Epitaph Records labelmates NOFX, Rancid, and Pennywise, among others. Gurewitz also had a project called Error, which also featured Atticus Ross, Leopold Ross, and Greg Puciato.

Gurewitz joined Bad Religion in 1979 at the age of 17, when he, Greg Graffin, Jay Bentley and Jay Ziskrout agreed to form a band. After releasing two albums and one EP, Gurewitz left Bad Religion in 1983, but rejoined three years later when the How Could Hell Be Any Worse? line-up (adding guitarist Greg Hetson as the second guitarist) was reuniting, and recorded five more albums with the band before they signed to Atlantic Records in 1993. Their Atlantic debut, Stranger Than Fiction (1994), was a breakthrough success, scoring their biggest hits "21st Century (Digital Boy)" and "Infected". However, he was overwhelmed by Epitaph's new popularity (including the unexpected success of the label's then-current acts The Offspring and Rancid) and decided to quit Bad Religion once again in 1994. Gurewitz continued working at Epitaph after his departure from Bad Religion, and released the "Hate You" single in 1996 with his one-off project Daredevils. During that time, he entered a period of drug addiction. By 1999, Gurewitz had successfully completed drug rehabilitation and reconciled with Graffin to co-write a song "Believe It", which appears on Bad Religion's 2000 album The New America. He eventually rejoined the band in 2001 to write and record the album The Process of Belief (2002). He remains with the band today, but only occasionally joins them live, such as when they are performing near his hometown or for televised appearances. Bad Religion has since released four more albums: The Empire Strikes First (2004), New Maps of Hell (2007), The Dissent of Man (2010), and True North (2013).

Jay Dee Bentley (born on June 6, 1964 in Wichita, Kansas) is the bassist and co-founding member of the punk rock group Bad Religion. He has played with the band through its whole existence with a small break between 1983 and 1985.


Deism

The Process of Belief is the twelfth studio album by the American punk rock band Bad Religion. It was produced by its leaders Greg Graffin and Brett Gurewitz, and was released on January 22, 2002 through Epitaph Records. After touring in support of its previous full-length studio album, The New America (2000), Gurewitz rejoined Bad Religion in 2001 after a seven-year hiatus. The band re-signed with Epitaph, and then began work on its first album for the label in over eight years. The album also marked the first album to feature Brooks Wackerman, who replaced former drummer Bobby Schayer.

The Process of Belief was another huge success (debuting at #49 on the Billboard 200 chart) and it was well received by both critics and fans. The album has sold more than 220,000 units worldwide. The Process of Belief features one of Bad Religion's well-known songs "Sorrow", the band's first to chart in the US in six years, since "A Walk" (from 1996's The Gray Race). "Broken", "The Defense" and "Supersonic" also received radio airplay, but all failed to make any national chart (although "Broken" reached #125 on the UK Singles Chart).

The New America is the eleventh studio album by punk band Bad Religion. It was released in 2000 and is their last album (to date) on Atlantic Records.

The New America is also Bad Religion's last album with Bobby Schayer on drums. Though not yet credited as a member of the band, then-former and now-current guitarist Brett Gurewitz co-wrote and played guitar on the song "Believe It". The album was re-released by Epitaph Records on September 15, 2008.

Bad Religion is a punk rock band that formed in Los Angeles in 1979. The band makes extensive use of soaring 3-part vocal harmonies (which they refer to in their album liner notes as the "oozin' aahs"), guitar solos and intellectual lyrics that often contain political or religious commentary. Their lyrics often relate to matters of social responsibility. The band's lineup has changed several times over its lifespan, with lead vocalist Greg Graffin being the only consistent member; the current lineup, however, features three out of four of the band's original members (Graffin, Brett Gurewitz and Jay Bentley). Bad Religion has released seventeen studio albums (one of which is a Christmas album), two live albums, three compilation albums, two EPs, and two DVDs (which were both recorded live). Although they gained a cult following with many of their early albums, Bad Religion did not experience major worldwide commercial success until the 1994 release of their eighth studio album Stranger Than Fiction, which spawned their biggest hits "Infected" and a re-recorded version of "21st Century (Digital Boy)", and was certified gold in both the United States and Canada. Their latest album, True North, was released on January 22, 2013. Bad Religion has sold over 5 million albums worldwide, and along with many of their contemporaries—such as The Offspring, Green Day, Rancid, NOFX and Social Distortion—they are one of the best-selling punk rock acts of all time.

Bad Religion was formed in Los Angeles in 1979 by high school students Greg Graffin, Jay Bentley, Jay Ziskrout, and Brett Gurewitz. According to bassist Jay Bentley, Bad Religion started around November or December 1979, "but no one can remember exactly. Greg Graffin wanted the year 2000 to be Bad Religion's 20th birthday". Their first public performance was playing 6 songs at a Fullerton California warehouse opening for Social Distortion. Their first official show was on November 11, 1980 at Joey Kills Bar in Burbank, California.

Punk rock is a rock music genre that developed between 1974 and 1976 in the United Kingdom, United States, and Australia. Rooted in garage rock and other forms of what is now known as protopunk music, punk rock bands eschewed perceived excesses of mainstream 1970s rock. Punk bands created fast, hard-edged music, typically with short songs, stripped-down instrumentation, and often political, anti-establishment lyrics. Punk embraces a DIY ethic; many bands self-produced recordings and distributed them through informal channels.

The term "punk" was first used in relation to rock music by some American critics in the early 1970s, to describe garage bands and their devotees. By late 1976, bands such as the Sex Pistols, The Clash and The Damned in London and Television and the Ramones in New York City were recognized as the vanguard of a new musical movement. The following year saw punk rock spreading around the world, and it became a major cultural phenomenon in the United Kingdom. For the most part, punk took root in local scenes that tended to reject association with the mainstream. An associated punk subculture emerged, expressing youthful rebellion and characterized by distinctive styles of clothing and adornment and a variety of anti-authoritarian ideologies.

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