Question:

What is the punctuation mark for declarative, interrogative, and imperative?

Answer:

A period (.) ends a declarative and imperative sentence. A question mark (?) ends an interrogative sentence. AnswerParty again!

More Info:

Interrogative is a term used in grammar to refer to features that form questions. Thus, an interrogative sentence is a sentence whose grammatical form indicates that it is a question. Such sentences are sometimes said to exhibit an interrogative mood—thus treating interrogative as one of the grammatical moods, specifically a type of epistemic mood. This applies particularly to languages that use different inflected verb forms to make questions.

Interrogative sentences can serve as yes–no questions or as wh-questions, the latter being formed using an interrogative word such as who, which, where or how to specify the information required. Different languages have different ways of forming questions, including the use of different word order and the insertion of interrogative particles. Questions are also frequently marked by intonation, in particular a rising intonation pattern – in some languages this may be the sole method of distinguishing a yes–no question from a declarative statement.

Linguistics Punctuation Language Grammar Semantics

In linguistics, sentence function refers to a speaker's purpose in uttering a specific sentence, phrase, or clause. Whether a listener is present or not is sometimes irrelevant. It answers the question: "Why has this been said?" The four basic sentence functions in the world's languages include the declarative, interrogative, exclamative, and the imperative. These correspond to a statement, question, exclamation, and command respectively. Typically, a sentence goes from one function to the next through a combination of changes in word order, intonation, the addition of certain auxiliaries or particles, or other times by providing a special verbal form. The four main categories can be further specified as being either communicative or informative.

Question

An interrogative word or question word is a function word used to ask a question, such as what, when, where, who, why and how. They are sometimes called wh-words, because in English most of them start with wh-. They may be used in both direct questions (Where is he going?) and in indirect questions (I wonder where he is going). In English and various other languages the same forms are also used as relative pronouns in certain relative clauses (The country where he was born) and certain adverb clauses (I go where he goes).

A particular type of interrogative word is the interrogative particle, which serves to convert a statement into a yes–no question, without having any other meaning. Examples include est-ce que in French, ли li in Russian, czy in Polish, কি ki in Bengali, ma in Chinese and ka in Japanese. (The English word whether has a similar function, but only in indirect questions.) Such particles contrast with other interrogative words, which form what are called -questionswh rather than yes–no questions.

Sentence Haplography

A full stop (British English, Hiberno-English, Australian English, Indian English, South African English, Sri Lankan English and New Zealand English) or period (American English and Canadian English) is the punctuation mark placed to indicate the end of sentences. In the context of web addresses and computing in general, it is typically called a dot. Some experts call it a baseline dot, because it is a dot on the baseline, as distinct from an interpunct (a middle dot). In conversation, as opposed to linguistics, the term is often used to mean "the end of the matter" (for example, "We are calling a full stop to discussions on this subject" or "We will not do it. Full stop." or "We will not do it. Period.").

The full stop symbol derives from Aristophanes of Byzantium who invented the system of punctuation where the height of placement of a dot on the line determined its meaning. The high dot (˙) was called a "periodos" and indicated a finished thought or sentence, the middle dot (·) was called a "kolon" and indicated part of a complete thought, while the low dot (.) was called a "telia" (from Greek τέλος "telos: end") and also indicated part of a complete thought.

The exclamation mark or exclamation point is a punctuation mark usually used after an interjection or exclamation to indicate strong feelings or high volume (shouting), and often marks the end of a sentence. Example: “Watch out!” The character is encoded in Unicode as U+0021 ! exclamation mark (HTML: !).

Homicide

The term crime does not, in modern times, have any simple and universally accepted definition, but one definition is that a crime, also called an offence or a criminal offence, is an act harmful not only to some individual, but also to the community or the state (a public wrong). Such acts are forbidden and punishable by law.

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