Question:

What is the poem from 10 things i hate about you, that julia stiles writes and reads?

Answer:

The poem was just made by the movie writers, but the poem is called "I Hate....Poem". Thanks, keep doing the AnswerParty!

More Info:

10 Things I Hate About You is a 1999 American teen romantic comedy-drama film. It is directed by Gil Junger and stars Julia Stiles and Heath Ledger. The romantic comedy screenplay was written by Karen McCullah Lutz and Kirsten Smith.

The film, a modernization of Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew, is titled after a poem written by the film's female lead (played by Stiles) to describe her bittersweet romance with the male lead (played by Ledger). The film was released March 31, 1999, and it was a breakout success for stars Stiles and Ledger. The film marks the motion picture directing debut of Junger.

Films

The Taming of the Shrew is a comedy by William Shakespeare, believed to have been written between 1590 and 1592.

The play begins with a framing device, often referred to as the Induction, in which a mischievous nobleman tricks a drunken tinker named Christopher Sly into believing he is actually a nobleman himself. The nobleman then has the play performed for Sly's diversion.

Julia O'Hara Stiles (born March 28, 1981) is an American actress. She first gained prominence for her lead roles in teen films such as 10 Things I Hate About You (1999), Down to You (2000) and Save the Last Dance (2001). Her career progressed to starring in films such as The Business of Strangers (2001), Mona Lisa Smile (2003) and The Omen (2006). She also played the supporting character Nicky Parsons in the film seriesBourne (2002-2007).

She guest starred as Lumen Pierce in the fifth season of the Showtime series, Dexter, a role that earned her Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award nominations. Most recently, Stiles had a supporting role in Silver Linings Playbook (2012), and also appears in Blue, a YouTube series from WIGS.

Julia

William Shakespeare (26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon". His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.

Shakespeare was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna, and twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592, he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part-owner of a playing company called the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613 at age 49, where he died three years later. Few records of Shakespeare's private life survive, and there has been considerable speculation about such matters as his physical appearance, sexuality, religious beliefs, and whether the works attributed to him were written by others.

British poetry is the field of British literature encompassing poetry from anywhere in the British world (whether of the British Isles, the British Empire, or the United Kingdom). The term is rarely used, as almost all such poets are clearly identified with one of the various nations or regions within those areas.

Types of poetry which might be considered British poetry include:

Genealogy Literature

Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard is a poem by Thomas Gray, completed in 1750 and first published in 1751. The poem’s origins are unknown, but it was partly inspired by Gray’s thoughts following the death of the poet Richard West in 1742. Originally titled Stanza's Wrote in a Country Church-Yard, the poem was completed when Gray was living near St Giles' parish church at Stoke Poges. It was sent to his friend Horace Walpole, who popularised the poem among London literary circles. Gray was eventually forced to publish the work on 15 February 1751, to pre-empt a magazine publisher from printing an unlicensed copy of the poem.

The poem is an elegy in name but not in form; it employs a style similar to that of contemporary odes, but it embodies a meditation on death, and remembrance after death. The poem argues that the remembrance can be good and bad, and the narrator finds comfort in pondering the lives of the obscure rustics buried in the churchyard. The two versions of the poem, Stanzas and Elegy, approach death differently; the first contains a stoic response to death, but the final version contains an epitaph which serves to repress the narrator's fear of dying. With its discussion of, and focus on, the obscure and the known, the poem has possible political ramifications, but it does not make any definite claims on politics to be more universal in its approach to life and death.

Entertainment Culture

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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