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What is the number to Walgreens on west stone Dr in kingsport, tn?

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1420 W. Stone Dr, Kingsport, TN 37660 Phone (423) 246-3551. Thank you for using AnswerParty

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Sullivan County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of 2010, the population was 156,823. Its county seat is Blountville. Sullivan County is part of the Kingsport–Bristol (TN)–Bristol (VA) Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. When originally established in 1779, Sullivan was a North Carolina county; from 1784 to 1788 it was part of the extra-legal State of Franklin. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 430 square miles (1,113 km²), of which 413 square miles (1,070 km²) is land and 17 square miles (43 km²) (3.88%) is water. Sullivan County's border with Carter County and Johnson County is defined as the ridgeline of Holston Mountain. Morrill Cave (also known as Worleys Cave) is a Tennessee State Natural Area. The cave has a surveyed length of 4.4 miles (7.1 km), making it the second longest cave in East Tennessee and the 177th longest cave in the United States. Morrill Cave is located on the south side of the Holston River, 2.5 miles (4.0 km) east of Bluff City. During the Civil War, the cave was a major source of saltpeter, the main ingredient of gunpowder. Significant evidence of this mining activity remains in the cave, including evidence of large amounts of saltpeter-bearing dirt that were removed, pick marks in the dirt, and an elaborate system of trails used by the miners. Cave historian Marion O. Smith has determined that there were two companies of the Confederate Nitre and Mining Bureau, District No. 7, that were active in Sullivan County. As of the census of 2000, there were 153,048 people, 63,556 households, and 44,806 families residing in the county. The population density was 371 people per square mile (143/km²). There were 69,052 housing units at an average density of 167 per square mile (65/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 96.55% White, 1.89% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.21% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races. 0.71% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. There were 63,556 households out of which 28.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.10% were married couples living together, 10.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.50% were non-families.according to the United States Census Bureau. Of 63,556 households, 1,915 are unmarried partner households: 1,702 heterosexual, 97 same-sex male, 116 same-sex female. 26.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.84. In the county, the population was spread out with 21.80% under the age of 18, 7.30% from 18 to 24, 28.40% from 25 to 44, 26.50% from 45 to 64, and 15.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.20 males. The median income for a household in the county was $33,529, and the median income for a family was $41,025. Males had a median income of $31,204 versus $21,653 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,202. About 9.70% of families and 12.90% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.10% of those under age 18 and 11.90% of those age 65 or over. Steve Godsey is the county mayor. The county commission has 24 members. Before 2010, commissioners were elected on a nonpartisan basis, but Sullivan County's commission election became a partisan election in 2010 after the county Republican Party decided to conduct a primary election for commission seats.
Kingsport is a city in Sullivan and Hawkins counties in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The population according to the 2010 census is 48,205. Kingsport is the largest city in the Kingsport–Bristol–Bristol, TN-VA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which had a population of 309,544 as of 2010. The Metropolitan Statistical Area is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. Census data from 2006–2008 for the Tri-Cities Combined Statistical Area estimates a population of 496,454. Kingsport is commonly included in what is known as the Mountain Empire, which spans a portion of Southwest Virginia and the mountainous counties in Tennessee to the east. The name "Kingsport" is a simplification of "King's Port", originally referring to the area on the Holston River known as King's Boat Yard, the head of navigation for the Tennessee Valley. Kingsport is located at (36.5369, −82.5421), at the intersection of U.S. highways 11 and 23. Kingsport is the northwest terminus of Interstate 26. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 45.0 square miles (116.6 km²) of which 44.1 square miles (114.1 km²) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.4 km²) (2.07%) is water. The North and South Forks of the Holston River converge on the west end of what is now Kingsport, and the town itself was known in 1787 as "Salt Lick" along the banks of the South Fork, about a mile from the confluence. The Long Island of the Holston River is near the confluence, which is mostly within the corporate boundaries of Kingsport. The island was an important site for the Cherokee, colonial pioneers and early settlers. Early settlements at the site were used as a staging ground for people taking the Wilderness Road leading to Kentucky through Cumberland Gap. First chartered in 1822, Kingsport became an important shipping port on the Holston River. Goods originating for many miles from the surrounding countryside were loaded onto barges for the journey downriver to the Tennessee River at Knoxville. In the Battle of Kingsport (December 13, 1864) during the American Civil War, a force of 300 Confederates under Colonel Richard Morgan (1836–1918) stopped a larger Union force for nearly two days. An army of over 5,500 troops under command of Major General George Stoneman (1822–1894) had left Knoxville, Tennessee, to raid Confederate targets in Virginia: the salt works at Saltville, the lead works at Wytheville and the iron works in Marion. While Col. Morgan's small band held off a main Union force under Major General Cullem Gillem on the opposite side the Holston River, Col. Samuel Patton took a force of cavalry to a ford in the river 2.5 miles (4.0 km) north and came down behind the Confederates. Out-numbered, out-flanked and demoralised by the bitter winter weather, Col. Morgan surrendered. The Confederates suffered 18 dead, and 84 prisoners of war were sent to a Union prison in Knoxville. The young town lost its charter after a downturn in its fortunes precipitated by the Civil War. On September 12, 1916, Kingsport residents demanded the death of circus elephant Mary (an Asian elephant who performed in the Sparks World Famous Shows Circus) for her killing of city hotel worker Walter Eldridge, who was hired the day before as an assistant elephant trainer by the circus. Eldridge was killed by Mary in Kingsport while he was taking her to a nearby pond. Mary was impounded by the local sheriff, and the leaders of several nearby towns threatened not to allow the circus to visit if Mary was included. The circus owner, Charlie Sparks, reluctantly decided that the only way to quickly resolve the situation was to hold a public execution. On the following day, she was transported by rail to Erwin, Tennessee, where a crowd of over 2,500 people assembled in the Clinchfield Railroad yard to watch her hang from a railroad crane. Re-chartered in 1917, Kingsport was an early example of a "garden city", designed by city planner and landscape architect John Nolen of Cambridge, Massachusetts. It carries the nickname the Model City from this plan, which organized the town into areas for commerce, churches, housing and industry. The result included some of the earlier uses of traffic circles (roundabouts) in the United States. Kingsport was among the first municipalities with a city manager form of government and a school system built on a model developed at Columbia University. Most of the land on the river was devoted to industry. Indeed, most of The Long Island is now occupied by Eastman Chemical Company, which is headquartered in Kingsport. Pal's Sudden Service, a regional fast-food restaurant chain, opened its first location in Kingsport in 1956. As of the census of 2000, there were 44,905 people, 19,662 households and 12,642 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,018.9 per square mile (393.4/km²). There were 21,796 housing units at an average density of 494.6 per square mile (191.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 93.32% White, 4.22% African American, 0.79% Asian, 0.24% American Indian/Alaska Native, 0.02% Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander, 0.34% some other race, and 1.06% two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.05% of the population. There were 19,662 households of which 26.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.5% were married couples living together, 12.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.7% were non-families. 32.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22, and the average family size was 2.80. In the city the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 6.5% from 18 to 24, 26.2% from 25 to 44, 25.3% from 45 to 64, and 20.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 84.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 79.4 males. The median income for a household in the city was $30,524, and the median income for a family was $40,183. Males had a median income of $33,075 versus $23,217 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,549. About 14.2% of families and 17.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.9% of those under age 18 and 13.0% of those age 65 or over. Kingsport uses the Council-Manager system which was established in 1917 when the city was re-chartered. Kingsport is governed locally by a seven member Board of Mayor and Aldermen (BMA). The citizens elect the mayor to a two year term and the six aldermen to four year terms. The elections take place in odd numbered years with the mayor and three aldermen elected every two years. New terms begin on July 1. The Board then elects a vice mayor from the six aldermen. As of 2012 the board is composed of Mayor Dennis Phillips, Vice Mayor Tom Parham, and Aldermen John Clark, Valerie Joh, Mike McIntire, Tom Segelhorst and Jantry Shupe. The Sullivan County portion of Kingsport is represented in the Tennessee House of Representatives by the 1st and 2nd State Representative Districts, and the Hawkins County portion by the 6th district. Currently serving in these positions are Representatives Jon Lundberg, Tony Shipley, and Dale Ford respectively. In the Tennessee State Senate, the Sullivan County portion of Kingsport is represented by the 2nd Senatorial District and the Hawkins County portion by the 4th district. Lt. Gov. Ron Ramsey and State Senator Mike Faulk currently serve in these positions. All of these elected officials are members of the Republican Party. Kingsport is represented in the United States House of Representatives by Republican Phil Roe of the 1st Congressional District. Residents of Kingsport are served by the Kingsport City Schools public school system which operates eight elementary schools, two middle schools, and one high school. In addition, Kingsport has eight private academies, most with religious affiliation. While no college or university houses its main campus within the city, Northeast State Technical Community College, East Tennessee State University, King College, Carson-Newman College, Milligan and the University of Tennessee have branch campuses in Kingsport. List of Kingsport city schools: Douglass High School in Kingsport was one of the largest African-American high schools in the region when it closed for desegregation in 1966. The school's former building on East Walnut Avenue (now East Sevier Avenue) was a historic Rosenwald School, built in 1929–30 with a combination of funds from the city, private citizens and the Rosenwald Fund. Although during the years of segregation the Douglass Tigers football team was not allowed to play white teams, the Tigers won a Tennessee state football championship and a state basketball championship in 1946, and a state basketball championship in 1948. The present building, built in 1951 at 301 Louis Street, is now the V.O. Dobbins Sr. Complex, named for Douglass' former principal, and home to most of Kingsport's non-profit agencies, a Parks and Recreation extension, as well as home to the Sons and Daughters of Douglass, Incorporated, administrators of the Douglass Alumni Association – Kingsport, an IRS 501(c)3 non-profit corporation. Newspapers: Television: Radio: AM: FM: The Kingsport Mets of the Appalachian League, a rookie-level baseball league, play in the city. An affiliate of the New York Mets, the team has competed in the city since 1969, with the exception of 1983. The Mets play in Hunter Wright Stadium named after former Mayor Hunter Wright. Kingsport is home to Eastman Chemical Company with its corporate headquarters, Domtar paper company, and Holston Army Ammunition Plant operated by BAE Systems' Ordnance Systems, Inc. Kingsport Police Department is the municipal law enforcement agency for Kingsport, Tennessee. The current chief is Gale Osborne. In 2006, the KPD consisted of 104 sworn officers, 44 full-time non-sworn officers, and 17 part-time non sworn officers. The budget for 2005 was $8,602,800. The KPD has twelve SWAT members that train regularly. KPD SWAT responded to thirteen emergency calls during 2005.
In Tennessee and Virginia the name "Tri-Cities" refers to the region comprising the cities of Kingsport, Johnson City and Bristol and the surrounding smaller towns and communities in Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia. All three of the principal cities are located in the extreme northeastern corner of Tennessee, while Bristol has a Twin city of the same name on the Virginia side. The Tri-Cities region was formerly a single Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA); due to the U.S. Census Bureau's revised definitions of urban areas in the early 2000s, it is now a Combined Statistical Area (CSA) with two metropolitan components: Johnson City and Kingsport-Bristol (TN)-Bristol (VA).[1] As of the 2000 Census, the CSA had a population of 480,091 (though a July 1, 2008 estimate placed the population at 500,538).
As of the census of 2000, there were 480,091 people, 199,218 households, and 138,548 families residing within the CSA. The racial makeup of the CSA was 96.22% White, 2.12% African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.02% from other races, and 0.74% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.92% of the population. The median income for a household in the CSA was $30,331, and the median income for a family was $37,254. Males had a median income of $29,561 versus $21,014 for females. The per capita income for the CSA was $16,923. Interstate Highways I-26 and I-81 intersect in the region, while I-40, I-77, and I-75 are nearby. Tri-Cities Regional Airport (TRI) has non-stop service to Atlanta, Charlotte, Chicago, Detroit, Ft. Lauderdale, Orlando, and St. Petersburg/Clearwater by American Eagle, Delta Connection, Allegiant Air, and US Airways Express. Additionally, TRI manages an aggressive Air Cargo program, administers Foreign Trade Zone 204, supports and promotes U.S. Customs Port 2027, and provides trade development assistance. The Region has both CSX and Norfolk Southern mainline railway access. The Kingsport Higher Education Center is a complex in downtown Kingsport, Tennessee that combines classes from five area colleges and universities, including The University of Tennessee. The All-America City Award is given by the National Civic League annually to ten cities in the United States. In 1999, the Tri-Cities were collectively designated as an All-America City by the National Civic League. The award is the oldest community recognition program in the nation and recognizes communities whose citizens work together to identify and tackle community-wide challenges and achieve uncommon results. Since the program's inception in 1949, more than 4,000 communities have competed and over 500 have been named All-America Cities. The Greater Tri-Cities of Tennessee and Virginia has four sister cities, as designated by Sister Cities International:
Johnson City is a city in Carter, Sullivan, and Washington counties in the U.S. state of Tennessee, with most of the city being in Washington County. The 2010 population for Johnson City was 63,152 by the United States Census, making it the eighth-largest city in the state. Johnson City is currently ranked the #14 "Best Small Place for Business and Careers" in the USA by Forbes, and #8 "Best Place for African Americans to Retire" in the USA by Black Enterprise magazine. Kiplinger ranked Johnson City #5 in "The 10 Least-Expensive Cities For Living in the U.S.A.", stating the low cost of living is attributed to affordable homes and below-average utility, transportation and health-care costs. Johnson City is the principal city of the Johnson City Metropolitan Statistical Area, a metropolitan area that covers Carter, Unicoi, and Washington counties and which had a combined population of 195,849 as of 2008. The Johnson City MSA is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. The Tri-Cities is the fifth largest CSA in Tennessee with an estimated 500,538 people in residence.

William Bean, traditionally recognized as Tennessee's first settler, built his cabin along Boone's Creek near Johnson City in 1769. In the 1780s, Colonel John Tipton (1730–1813) established a farm (now the Tipton-Haynes State Historic Site) just outside of what is now Johnson City. During the State of Franklin movement, Tipton was a leader of the loyalist faction, residents of the region who wanted to remain part of North Carolina rather than form a separate state. In February 1788, an armed engagement took place at Tipton's farm between Tipton and his men and the forces led by John Sevier, the leader of the Franklin faction. Founded in 1856 by Henry Johnson as a railroad station called "Johnson's Depot," Johnson City became a major rail hub for the southeast, as three railway lines crossed in the downtown area. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Johnson City served as headquarters for the narrow gauge East Tennessee and Western North Carolina Railroad (the ET&WNC, nicknamed "Tweetsie") and the standard gauge Clinchfield Railroad. Both rail systems featured excursion trips through scenic portions of the Blue Ridge Mountains and were engineering marvels of railway construction. The Southern Railway (now Norfolk Southern) also passes through the city. During the American Civil War, before it was formally incorporated in 1869, the name of the town was briefly changed to Haynesville in honor of Confederate Senator Landon Carter Haynes. Henry Johnson's name was quickly restored following the war, with Johnson elected as the city's first Mayor on January 3, 1870. The town grew rapidly from 1870 until 1890 as railroad and mining interests flourished. However, the national depression of 1893, which caused many railway failures (including the Charleston, Cincinnati and Chicago Railroad or "3-Cs", a predecessor of the Clinchfield) and a resulting financial panic, halted Johnson City's boom town momentum. In 1901, the Mountain Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (now the U.S. Veterans Affairs Medical Center and National Cemetery), Mountain Home, Tennessee was created by an Act of the US Congress introduced by Walter P. Brownlow. Construction on this 450-acre (1.8 km2) campus, designed to serve disabled Civil War veterans, was completed in 1903 at a cost of $3 million. Prior to completion of the facility, the assessed value of the entire town was listed at $750,000. The East Tennessee State Normal School was authorized in 1911 and the new college campus located directly across from the National Soldiers Home. Johnson City began rapidly growing and became the fifth-largest city in Tennessee by 1930. Together with neighboring Bristol, VA/TN, Johnson City was noted as a hotbed for old-time music; it hosted noteworthy Columbia Records recording sessions in 1928 known as the Johnson City Sessions. Native son "Fiddlin' Charlie" Bowman became a national recording star via these sessions. The Fountain Square area in downtown featured a host of local and traveling street entertainers including Blind Lemon Jefferson. During the 1920s and the Prohibition era, Johnson City's ties to the bootlegging activity of the Appalachian Mountains earned the city the nickname of "Little Chicago". Stories persist that the town was one of several distribution centers for Chicago gang boss Al Capone during Prohibition. Capone had a well-organized distribution network within the southern United States for alcohol smuggling; it shipped his products from the mountain distillers to northern cities. Capone was, according to local lore, a part-time resident of Montrose Court, a luxury apartment complex now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The city is featured in a song and video by Travis Tritt called "Modern Day Bonnie and Clyde," although the line "rollin' north on 95" is fictionalized, as Interstate 81 and Interstate 26 intersect near Johnson City. The city is mentioned in a song by Old Crow Medicine Show called "Wagon Wheel", in the lyric "Walkin' due south out of Roanoke, I caught a trucker out of Philly had a nice long toke. But he’s a heading west from the Cumberland Gap, to Johnson City, Tennessee." The song gets the geography wrong, as Johnson City is east of the Cumberland Gap. For many years, the city had a municipal 'privilege tax' on carnival shows, in an attempt to dissuade traveling circuses and other transient entertainment businesses from doing business in town. The use of drums by merchants to draw attention to their goods is prohibited. Title Six, Section 106 of the city's municipal code, the so-called Barney Fife ordinance, empowers the city's police force to draft into involuntary service as many of the town's citizens as necessary to aid police in making arrests and in preventing or quelling any riot, unlawful assembly or breach of peace. Johnson City is run by a five person commission. The commissioners as of May 2011 are as follows: M. Denis "Pete" Peterson is the current city manager. Johnson City is located at (36.3354, -82.3728). Johnson City shares a contiguous southeastern border with Elizabethton. Johnson City also shares contiguous borders with Kingsport to the far north along I-26 and Bluff City to the east along US 11E. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 39.6 square miles (102.5 km²), of which 39.3 square miles (101.7 km²) is land and 0.3 square mile (0.8 km²; 0.78%) is water. The steep mountains, rolling hills and valleys surrounding the region are part of the Appalachian Ridge-and-Valley Province, and Johnson City is just west of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Roan Mountain, with an elevation of over 6,000 feet (1,800 m), is approximately 20 miles (32 km) to the east of the city. Buffalo Mountain, a ridge over 2,700 feet (820 m) high, is the location of a city park on the south side of town. Boone Lake, a TVA reservoir on the Holston and Watauga Rivers, is also partly within the city limits. The Nolichucky River flows close to Johnson City towards its southern side. Whitewater rafting and kayaking opportunities exist where that river flows from the North Carolina state line near Erwin.
As of the census of 2000, there were 55,469 people, 23,720 households, and 14,018 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,412.4 people per square mile (545.4/km²). There were 25,730 housing units at an average density of 655.1 per square mile (253.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.09% White, 6.40% African American, 0.26% Native American, 1.22% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.69% from other races, and 1.32% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.89% of the population. There were 23,720 households out of which 25.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 33.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.82. In the city the population was spread out with 19.8% under the age of 18, 13.7% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.0 males. The median income for a household in the city was $30,835, and the median income for a family was $40,977. Males had a median income of $31,326 versus $22,150 for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,364. About 11.4% of families and 15.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.9% of those under age 18 and 12.7% of those age 65 or over. Johnson City is served by Tri-Cities Regional Airport (IATA Code TRI) and Johnson City Airport (0A4), located in Wautaga. Johnson City is bisected by Interstate 26, which connects the city to Kingsport to the north and Asheville, North Carolina and Spartanburg, South Carolina to the south. The city is also served by Interstate 81, which intersects I-26 a few miles north of the city limits, and carries drivers to Knoxville to the west and Bristol, TN/VA to the northeast. Johnson City Transport (JCT) operates a system of buses inside the city limits, including a route every fifteen minutes along Roan Street. The Johnson City Transit Center, located downtown on West Market Street, also serves as the transfer point for Greyhound lines running through the city. JCT operates the BucShot, a system serving the greater ETSU campus. Elementary Schools
Middle schools High schools Johnson City is an economic hub largely fueled by East Tennessee State University and the medical "Med-Tech" corridor, anchored by the Johnson City Medical Center, Franklin Woods Community Hospital, Saratoga Technologies, Inc., ETSU's Gatton College of Pharmacy and ETSU's Quillen College of Medicine. Johnson City is currently ranked #35 "Best Small Place for Business and Careers" in the USA. Due to its climate, high quality health care and affordable housing, it is ranked #8 "Best Place for African Americans to Retire" by Black Enterprise magazine. Kiplinger ranked Johnson City #5 in "The 10 Least-Expensive Cities For Living in the U.S.A.", stating the low cost of living is attributed to affordable homes and below-average utility, transportation and health-care costs. The popular citrus soda, Mountain Dew, traces its origins to Johnson City. In July 2012, PepsiCo announced that a new, malt-flavored version of the drink will be named Mountain Dew Johnson City Gold, in honor of the city. The drink will be test marketed in the Chicago metropolitan area, as well as Denver, Colorado, and Charlotte, North Carolina, beginning in late August.
Johnson City serves as a regional medical center for northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia, along with parts of western North Carolina and Kentucky. Although there are two major hospital systems in the Tri-Cities, only one – Mountain States Health Alliance – has a presence in Johnson City. The Johnson City Medical Center, designated a Level 1 Trauma Center by the State of Tennessee, is MSHA's flagship institution. Also affiliated with the center are the Niswonger Children's Hospital, a domestic affiliate of St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and Woodridge Hospital, a mental health and chemical dependency facility. Franklin Woods Community Hospital is a LEED-certified facility located in North Johnson City. The "green" hospital (opened July 12, 2010) encloses approximately 240,000 square feet (22,000 m2) on a 25-acre (100,000 m2) lot adjacent to The Wellness Center inside MedTech Park. The hospital has 80 licensed beds and a 22-room Emergency Department. Of the licensed beds, 20 are dedicated to Women’s and Children’s Services. The James H. & Cecile C. Quillen Rehabilitation Hospital, also located in North Johnson City, serves patients who have suffered debilitating trauma, including stroke and brain-spine injuries. Additionally, the James H. Quillen VA Medical Center, located in the Mountain Home community in Johnson City's southside, serves veterans in the four-state region. The center is closely involved with the ETSU College of Medicine. The Hands On! Museum, located in downtown Johnson City, houses an interactive gallery of exhibits and is a local favorite for school field trips. The corporate headquarters of General Shale Brick, between North Johnson City and Boones Creek, is home to a museum that showcases a collection of historically significant bricks including a 10,000-year-old specimen from the ancient city of Jericho. The Tipton-Haynes State Historic Site is located in the south of the city. Along with a museum and education center, there are eleven other buildings on-site dedicated to preserving and sharing traditional Appalachian farming and craft methods. The site hosts the Bluegrass and Sorghum Making Festival every year, as well as other events during holidays and in the summer. The Little Chicago Blues Festival is an annual celebration of the legendary Prohibition-era speakeasies and railroad glory days of Johnson City. The festival is housed in the historic Down Home, a regional hub for Americana and bluegrass music performance. The event is also a fundraiser for WETS-FM, the local NPR affiliate. The Umoja Unity Festival is held annually in downtown Johnson City. Initiated in 1978, Umoja, a Swahili word meaning unity, is a festival that spotlights the diverse societies of Johnson City, with an emphasis on African-American and Latino cultures. The downtown celebration includes musical performance as well as food and craft vendors. The Blue Plum Festival is a free art and music festival held outdoors in the downtown. Many regionally and nationally acclaimed musical artists perform each year, mostly from the bluegrass, folk and Americana genres. The Blue Plum Animation Festival is held in conjunction with the main festival and East Tennessee State University. The festival also hosts a Division I cycling event, the Sanofi Aventis Criterium. Each month the Downtown shopping district of Johnson City is home to "First Friday," a meandering art and music festival. Begun at Nelson Fine Art for introducing new artists to the public, First Friday has spread into the rest of the district. It features closed streets, restaurant specials, gallery receptions and shopping specials. As a regional hub for a four-state area, Johnson City is home to a large variety of retail business, from well-known national chains to local boutiques and galleries. The Mall at Johnson City is the city's only enclosed shopping mall. . Recently, California-based Forever 21 opened a XXI Forever flagship store in the mall's upper level, and Express opened in late 2010. The nearby Target Center houses Target, TJ Maxx, Books-A-Million, and Pier One. Much of the new retail development is located in North Johnson City, along State of Franklin Road. Johnson City Crossings, the largest of these developments. On the other side of the highway are retailers Kohl's, Lowe's, Sam's Club and Barnes and Noble. Downtown Johnson City is seeing an increased retail presence, including art galleries, boutiques, and antique sellers. Long-standing businesses include Main Street Antiques and Mercantile, Campbell's Morrell Music, Nelson Fine Art and Masengill's Specialty Shop. Downtown will soon be home to Asheville based restaurant Tupelo Honey Cafe, who plans to open a restaurant in 2014. The area is served by the Johnson City Press, one of the three major newspapers in the northeast Tennessee region.
The Loafer is the Tri-Cities' free weekly alternative arts and entertainment magazine.
The Johnson City News and Neighbor is a free weekly community newspaper.
The Business Journal of Tri-Cities, TN/VA, based out of Johnson City, is the region's largest business magazine. WJHL-TV is a CBS affiliate licensed in Johnson City. The city is part of the Tri-Cities DMA. Johnson City is part of the Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol Arbitron radio market. WETS-FM 89.5 FM, located on the campus of East Tennessee State University, is the region's NPR affiliate and the Tri-Cities' first HD radio service. WJCW 910 AM and WQUT 101.5 FM are Cumulus Media stations which are also licensed in Johnson City. The EDGE is a non-broadcasting student-run radio station at East Tennessee State University.
The Kingsport Area Transit System, calling itself KATS, is the primary provider of mass transportation in Kingsport, Tennessee. The agency was established in 1995 and currently has five routes. Service operates on weekdays only, and all buses originate from a city center terminal. KATS
The mission of Holston Army Ammunition Plant (HSAAP) is to manufacture Research Department Explosive (RDX) and High Melting Explosive (HMX) for ammunition production and development. Research and development plays a vital role in the production of new and better explosives and products. It is government-owned and contractor-operated (GOCO). Information Provided by the Joint Munitions Command The Holston Army Ammunition Plant, also known as the Holston Ordnance Works, was constructed by Tennessee Eastman in Kingsport, Tennessee to manufacture explosives during World War II. BAE Systems' division Ordnance Systems, Inc. currently operates the plant under a 25-year facilities use contract. On May 12, 2011, the Army announced that BAE Systems had won the contract to operate Radford Army Ammunition Plant in nearby Radford, VA as well. Capabilities of the plant include: production and development of insensitive munitions explosives; synthesis and manufacture of high explosives; recrystallization and purification from organic solvents; melt-cast, cast-cured, pressed and extruded explosives formulation; explosives performance testing; full-spectrum explosives research and development capability; and custom and fine chemical manufacture for the defense industry. Information Provided by the Joint Munitions Command The current plant is on two sites: Plant A is in Kingsport, and Plant B is about 4 miles (6.4 km) away in a less developed part of Hawkins County. The two plants are connected by rail. Plant A has 120 acres (0.49 km2). Plant B has 5,900 acres (24 km2). The site as a whole includes 465 buildings. Holston Ordnance Works [HOW] was established in July 1942 and stopped production in 1945. It was reactivated in 1949 during the Cold War and continues today. The installation was renamed Holston Army Ammunition Plant [HSAAP or HAAP] in the early 1960s. Holston Defense Corporation operated the facility from 1949 through 1999 under a series of cost reimbursement contracts with the U. S. Army. The plant was constructed 1942-1944 for use by the government contractor, Tennessee Eastman Corporation, a subsidiary of Eastman Kodak. During World War II, it manufactured Composition B, a very powerful explosive mixture of RDX and TNT. The facility was placed in standby status after World War II, producing only fertilizer, until it was reactivated in 1949 under the Holston Defense Corporation, a new subsidiary of Eastman Kodak. During the Korean War, the plant continued to manufacture Composition B as well as rework its stockpiled Composition B. New production lines were built during 1951-1954 in order to produce for the war. However, after the Korean War it was reduced to a one-line operation. It did not resume large-scale production until the mid-1960s when it was again modernized to produce large amounts of Composition B for the Vietnam War. After 1973, production was again reduced to a much smaller amount, but the plant also began producing “special-order” explosives and propellants for the Armed Services, including the Navy’s Trident missile program. It also handles and stores material for the national defense stockpile. As of 1988, the plant produced all of the RDX/HMX consumed in the USA, and 90 percent of that used by all of the nations friendly to the USA. HSAAP is housed on 6,024 acres (24.38 km2) with 325 buildings, 130 igloos and storage capacity of 275,000 square feet (25,500 m2).Information Provided by the Joint Munitions Command
 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "http://www.jmc.army.mil".
WHGG is a Contemporary Christian and Religious Talk talk formatted broadcast radio station licensed to Kingsport, Tennessee, serving the Tri-Cities, VA/TN area. WHGG is owned and operated by Kenneth Clyde Hill. Dr. Kenneth C. Hill is the owner of WHGG and sister stations WHCB, WHGB, and WPWT.
(423) 246-3551 Kingsport Tennessee

The United States is a country in the Northern Hemisphere, Western Hemisphere, and the Eastern Hemisphere. It consists of forty-eight contiguous states in North America, Alaska, a peninsula which forms the northwestern most part of North America, and Hawaii, an archipelago in the Pacific Ocean. There are several United States territories in the Pacific and Caribbean. The term "United States", when used in the geographical sense, means the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Virgin Islands of the United States. The country shares land borders with Canada and Mexico and maritime (water) borders with Russia, Cuba, and the Bahamas in addition to Canada and Mexico.

Old Kingsport Presbyterian Church (formerly known as Boatyard Presbyterian Church and Kingsport Presbyterian Church) is an historic church located in Kingsport, Tennessee. The church, was organized May 20, 1820 as the Boatyard Congregation and is the oldest one of any denomination in the city of Kingsport. It is a member of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

The congregation originally met in a log structure located in the present-day Old Kingsport Presbyterian Church cemetery. The cemetery remains in use and contains several graves that predate the Civil War in its oldest section.

Interstate 81 marker

Interstate 81 is an 855-mile (1,376 km) long expressway stretching from Dandridge, Tennessee northward to the Thousand Islands Bridge at the United States-Canada border near Fishers Landing, New York. In Tennessee, Interstate 81 runs for 75 miles (121 km) from its southern terminus at Interstate 40 in Dandridge to the Virginia state line in Bristol.

The Kingsport–Bristol–Bristol, Tennessee-Virginia Metropolitan Statistical Area is a Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) in Northeast Tennessee and Southwest Virginia as defined by the United States Office of Management and Budget (OMB). It was formed in December 2003 by the merger of the Bristol, VA MSA and Kingsport-Bristol, TN-VA MSA.

As of the 2000 census, the MSA had a population of 298,494 (though a July 1, 2009 estimate placed the population at 305,629).

Tennessee

Kingsport is a city in Sullivan, Hawkins and Washington counties in the State of Tennessee. The population according to the 2010 census is 48,205.

Kingsport is the largest city in the Kingsport–Bristol–Bristol, TN-VA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), which had a population of 309,544 as of 2010. The Metropolitan Statistical Area is a component of the Johnson City–Kingsport–Bristol, TN-VA Combined Statistical Area – commonly known as the "Tri-Cities" region. Census data from 2006–2008 for the Tri-Cities Combined Statistical Area estimates a population of 496,454.

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In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

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