Question:

What is the nearest Bart station to geary and polk in San Francisco?

Answer:

Civic Center Station. 1150 Market Street San Francisco CA 94102

More Info:

Muni
MUNI
22 Fillmore
37 Corbett
L Owl Church Street Station is a Muni Metro station at the intersection of Market Street, Church Street and 14th Street in San Francisco, California. The J Church, which enters and exits the Market Street tunnel in a portal near the station, has an aboveground stop on Church and Market Streets. The N Judah also exits the tunnel before reaching the station and stops one block away at Church and Duboce Avenue. The station consists of two side platforms next to the tracks on the second level down with the concourse mezzanine level overlooking it. At both Church Street Station and Castro Street Station, there is only one stairway on each side of Market Street leading into the station. (All other stations on the Market Street Subway have entrances spread out along the length of the station.) One of these entrances is located on the north-west corner of Market and 14th Street, and the other is on the south-west corner of Market and Church Street. Church Street Station is featured in the Nick Nolte/Eddie Murphy cop dramedy 48 Hours, with shots of entrances, plaza and platform levels, and train operations. Service at this station began in June 1980.
Polk Street is a street in San Francisco, California, that travels northward from Market Street to Beach Street and is one of the main thoroughfares of the Polk Gulch neighborhood traversing through the Tenderloin, Nob Hill, and Russian Hill neighborhoods. The street takes its name from former U.S. President James K. Polk. The street remains a busy business district with many restaurants, cafes, home decorating and hardware stores. The street also has bike lanes, which were approved in 2002. San Francisco bike route 25 runs along Polk Street, and is the only North-South route suitable for casual bicycle travel within at least a mile in either direction. There is an ongoing debate on whether to increase the level of these improvements. Polk street is named for James Knox Polk (November 2, 1795 – June 15, 1849) the 11th President of the United States (1845–1849). During the Mexican-American War, and after the Texas annexation, Polk turned his attention to California, hoping to acquire the territory from Mexico before any European nation. The main interest was San Francisco Bay as an access point for trade with Asia. Polk Gulch is the neighborhood around a section of Polk Street, and its immediate vicinity, that runs through the Nob Hill and Russian Hill neighborhoods from approximately Geary Street to Union Street. The name, somewhat humorous, arises because the street runs over an old stream at the bottom of a gently-sloped valley. The neighborhood is sometimes referred to as Lower Nob Hill or the Tendernob. Polk Gulch was San Francisco's main gay neighborhood before 1970, when many gays began to move to The Castro (formerly Eureka Valley) and SOMA because many large Victorian houses were available for low rent or could be purchased with low down payments. Several gay, lesbian, and transgender bars and clubs remain in the area. As the original center of the city's LGBT community, it has remained one of the core centers along with The Castro and the South of Market (SOMA); Polk Street was the location of the first official San Francisco Gay Pride Parade in 1972. In the 1950s through the 1970s Halloween on Polk Street became a major attraction for tourists and locals. In the 1990s and 2000s the neighborhood started to gentrify. It remains prominent for its nightlife although prostitutes and their pimps are still a common sight on the street. Male prostitutes were once common on Polk Street, but now ply their trade mostly over the Internet.
Geary Boulevard (designated as Geary Street east of Van Ness Avenue) is a major east-west thoroughfare in San Francisco, California, beginning downtown at Market Street near Market Street's intersection with Kearny Street, and running westbound through downtown, the Civic Center area, the Western Addition, and running for most of its length through the predominantly residential Richmond District. Geary Boulevard terminates near Sutro Heights Park at 48th Avenue, close to the Cliff House above Ocean Beach at the Pacific Ocean. At 40th Avenue, Geary intersects with Point Lobos Avenue, which takes through traffic to the Cliff House, Ocean Beach and the Great Highway. It is a major commercial artery through the Richmond District; it is lined with stores and restaurants, many of them catering to the various immigrant groups (Chinese, Russian, and Irish, among many others) who live in the area. The boulevard borders Japantown between Fillmore and Laguna Streets. Geary Boulevard carries two-way traffic for most of its route, but the segment east of Gough Street carries only westbound traffic; at Gough, eastbound traffic is diverted by a short curved street, Starr King Way, onto O'Farrell Street, which runs parallel to Geary until it reaches Market Street. The roadway is named for John W. Geary, the first mayor of San Francisco after California became a U.S. state. (Later, he also had the unique distinction of serving as governor of both Kansas and Pennsylvania.) It began life as a dirt carriage track out to the Cliff House and Ocean Beach and for a time a flat track paralleled the road where horsemen raced their mounts on Sundays. Muni bus service along Geary Boulevard is provided by the 38 Geary bus line, which is the most heavily used bus line in the city with over 50,000 passengers per day, and over 100,000 passengers per day in adjacent lines (1 California, 2 Clement, 31 Balboa). There have been feasibility studies by Muni that have investigated the possibility of creating a light rail line on Geary, but no plans have been adopted yet. A bus rapid transit line is being planned on Geary Boulevard between Van Ness and 33rd Avenue. The target completion date is now 2019-2020. This bus rapid transit corridor will have dedicated bus lanes down Geary Boulevard. The dedicated lanes are planned to be "rail ready," which means the corridor will be designed so as not to preclude future conversion to a streetcar line, including a subway section in downtown. This would not be the first streetcar line on Geary. From 1912, when the San Francisco Municipal Railway began service, until 1956, when redevelopment projects led by Justin Herman included removal and replacement with buses, the A Geary-10th Avenue, B Geary, C Geary-California, and D Geary-Van Ness lines all ran along Geary from Market Street to 10th Avenue, 33rd Avenue, 2nd Avenue, and Van Ness Avenue, respectively. The B Geary line eventually reached Playland and Ocean Beach after turning south at 33rd Avenue and then west on Balboa Avenue. At 33rd Avenue streetcars of the Market Street Railway came down from Clement Street and continued along to the end of Geary at 48th Avenue where they turned north and entered a private right of way at Point Lobos Avenue to reach a car barn at Sutro Baths. This made the entire length of Geary from Market Street to 48th served by streetcars. If and when a future streetcar line is built along Geary, it's likely it will once again use the "B" letter.][ Prior to the streetcars running on Geary, cable cars were operated on the street from 1880 to 1912 by the Geary Street, Park and Ocean Railway. They initially ran from Market Street to Central (now Presidio), where they connected to an extension running steam powered cars along Geary to 1st Avenue (now Arguello), which then turned south to reach Golden Gate Park. In 1892 the cable car line was extended to 5th Avenue, where it turned south to reach Golden Gate Park directly. Despite its name, the Geary Street Park & Ocean Railway never actually reached the ocean. The section of the boulevard between Franklin Street and Masonic Avenue was upgraded to a signalized expressway in the 1960s.][ It features between four and eight through lanes and two grade separations at Masonic and Fillmore, complete with semi-exits. Geary Boulevard also has the highest address and block numbers in San Francisco, with the last block being the 8300 block. In addition, although it is not signed, the city's GIS database records the underpass of Masonic Avenue as the 8400 block.
Muni Metro
MUNI
2 Clement
3 Jackson
5 Fulton
6 Parnassus
8X Bayshore Express
8AX Bayshore "A" Express
8BX Bayshore "B" Express
9 San Bruno
9L San Bruno Limited
10 Townsend
12 Folsom-Pacific
21 Hayes
30 Stockton
31 Balboa
38 Geary
38L Geary Limited
45 Union-Stockton
71 Haight-Noriega
71L Haight-Noriega Limited
81X Caltrain Express
L Owl
N Owl
SamTrans Routes
292 (short walk from mission) KX (short walk from mission ) 391 ( short walk from mission) Valley of the Moon Commute Club
Sonoma-San Francisco^
^Stops on Mission Street and 1st
AC Transit
Montgomery Street Station is a Muni Metro and Bay Area Rapid Transit station in the Financial District of San Francisco, California. It is located on the Market Street Subway beneath Market Street, between Montgomery Street and Sansome Street. Like all of the shared BART and Muni stations on the Market Street Subway, the concourse mezzanine is on the first level down, an island platform for the Muni Metro is on the second level down, and the island platform for BART is on the third level down. Both the Transbay Terminal and Golden Gate University are located on Mission Street, near Montgomery Station. Service at this station began on November 5, 1973.
Muni Metro
Powell Street is a shared Muni Metro and Bay Area Rapid Transit station near the intersection of Market Street and Powell Street in downtown San Francisco. The station is located along the Market Street Subway and extends underground from Fourth Street to Fifth Street. Hallidie Plaza connects to the station on the north side of Market Street. Like all of the shared BART and Muni stations on the Market Street Subway, the concourse mezzanine is on the first level down, an island platform for the Muni Metro is on the second level down, and the island platform for BART is on the third level down. The Powell-Mason and Powell-Hyde cable car lines turn around at Powell and Market, above the station. Union Square is three blocks north of the station, the Westfield San Francisco Centre is on Market at Powell and the old United States Mint building is located one block away at Fifth Street and Mission Street. Also nearby is the famous Yerba Buena Gardens and Moscone Center, each about a block away, near Mission Street on 4th. Within the area is the The Metreon shopping center and movie theater. More tourist information is available at the San Francisco Visitor's Bureau located in Hallidie Plaza. Powell Street is also the hub for San Francisco's Theater District. The Geary Theater, home American Conservatory Theater, is three-and-a-half blocks away. Next door to that is the historic Curran Theatre, now home to several touring Broadway productions. In Yerba Buena Gardens is the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, home to several performances and visual art that has enriched San Francisco. Located in Union Square is San Francisco's own TIX Bay Area, a Ticketmaster booth that also sells half-price tickets to several local theater companies. Service at this station began on November 5, 1973. [1]
MUNI
6 Parnassus
9 San Bruno
9L San Bruno Limited
47 Van Ness
49 Van Ness-Mission
71 Haight-Noriega
71L Haight-Noriega Limited
90 Owl
L Owl
N Owl AC Transit
Van Ness Station is a Muni Metro station on the Market Street Subway at the intersection of Market Street and Van Ness Avenue (U.S. Route 101) in San Francisco, California. The station consists of a concourse mezzanine on the first floor down, and a single island platform on the second level down. Service at this station began in February 1980.][ It is the final station (going outbound) or the first station (going inbound) wherein all of Muni Metro's lines run together along the Market Street Subway (until the Embarcadero Station), and going outbound, the metro lines split into two general directions prior to Church Station: the J and N lines exit the subway before Market & Church Streets to operate on surface streets, while the K, L, M, and S lines continue through the Market Street Subway to serve Church Station. Going inbound, the J and N lines enter the subway through the same portal where they exit outbound and meet up with the L, M, S, and T lines before heading into Van Ness Station.
Market Street is an important thoroughfare in San Francisco, California. It begins at The Embarcadero in front of the Ferry Building at the northeastern edge of the city and runs southwest through downtown, passing the Civic Center and the Castro District, to the intersection with Corbett Avenue in the Twin Peaks neighborhood. Beyond this point, the roadway continues as Portola Drive into the southwestern quadrant of San Francisco. Portola Drive extends south to the intersection of St. Francis Boulevard and Sloat Boulevard, where it continues as Junipero Serra Boulevard. Market Street is the boundary of two street grids. Streets on its southeast side are parallel or perpendicular to Market Street, while those on the northwest are nine degrees off from the cardinal directions. Market Street is a major transit artery for the city of San Francisco, and has carried in turn horse-drawn streetcars, cable cars, electric streetcars, electric trolleybuses, and diesel buses. Today Muni's buses, trolleybuses, and heritage streetcars (on the F Market line) share the street, while below the street the two-level Market Street Subway carries Muni Metro and BART. While cable cars no longer operate on Market Street, the surviving cable car lines terminate to the side of the street at its intersections with California Street and Powell Street. Market Street has been compared to Fifth Avenue, Broadway, and the Champs-Élysées.][ Market Street cuts across the city for three miles (5 km) from the waterfront to the hills of Twin Peaks. It was laid out originally by Jasper O'Farrell, a 26-year old trained civil engineer who emigrated to Yerba Buena, as the town was then known. The town was renamed San Francisco in 1847 after it was captured by Americans during the Mexican-American War. O'Farrell first repaired the original layout of the settlement around Portsmouth Square and then established Market Street as the widest street in town, 120 feet between property lines. (Van Ness now beats it with 125 feet.) It was described at the time as an arrow aimed straight at "Los Pechos de la Chola" (the Breasts of the Maiden), now called Twin Peaks. Writing in Forgotten Pioneers, T.F. Pendergast wrote: "When the engineer had completed his map of Market Street and the southern part of the city, what was regarded as the abnormal width of the proposed street excited part of the populace, and an indignation meeting was held to protest against the plan as wanton disregard for rights of landowners; and the mob, for such it was, decided for lynch law. A friend warned O'Farrell, before the crowd had dispersed. He rode with all haste to North Beach, took a boat for Sausalito, and thence put distance behind him on fast horses in relay until he reached his retreat in Sonoma. He found it discreet to remain some time in the country before venturing to return to the city." At the time, the right-of-way of Market Street was blocked by a sixty-foot sand dune where the Palace Hotel is now, and a hundred yards further west stood a sand hill nearly ninety feet tall. The city soon filled in the ground between Portsmouth Square and Happy Valley at First and Mission Street. The dunes were leveled and the sand used for fill. Market Street underwent major changes in the late 1970s and early 1980s, when Muni Metro service was moved underground in concert with the construction of the Bay Area Rapid Transit system. Market Street parades have long marked global events, such as the Panama-Pacific International Exposition, the Preparedness Day bombing of 1916, the parade of the influenza-masked revelers of the first Armistice Day, the 1934 general strike that paralyzed the ports of the Pacific Coast, the end of World War II. In the days of the first United Nations conferences, Anthony Eden, Molotov, Stettinius, and Bidault sped up Market Street, waving to the crowds of hopefuls. On Christmas Eve in 1910 opera singer Luisa Tetrazzini (for whom the dish Tetrazzini was named) sang a free outdoor concert to a crowd some estimated at 250,000, following a dispute with Oscar Hammerstein. Another historic Market Street event was the New Year's Eve celebration at the Ferry Building on December 31, 1999. Over 1.2 million people jammed Market Street and nearby streets for the raucous and peaceful turn-of-the-century celebration. The San Francisco Gay Pride parade runs down Market Street, attracting many people every year. Central Market Community Benefit District extends from Fifth to Ninth Streets, and is considered part of either the "Mid Market" or "South of Market" areas. On September 29, 2009, traffic-calming efforts took effect for a six-week test in which private automobiles would be restricted in travelling east from Sixth Street towards the Ferry Building. All eastbound traffic will be encouraged to turn right onto 10th Steet and then required to do so at 8th Street. Eastbound traffic entering Market from Seventh Street will be required to exit Market at Sixth. These traffic-calming efforts are following recent urban planning trends seeking to make streets safer and more pleasant. Drivers failing to comply would face fines. These changes were later made permanent. Planning efforts are currently underway to ban private automobiles from Market Street altogether between Franklin and Steuart Streets, in order to provide a better environment for transit, cyclists, and pedestrians.
Civic Center Station Bart station

San Francisco Listeni/sæn frənˈsɪsk/, officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the leading financial and cultural center of Northern California and the San Francisco Bay Area.

The only consolidated city-county in California, San Francisco encompasses a land area of about 46.9 square miles (121 km2) on the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, giving it a density of about 17,620 people per square mile (6,803 people per km2). It is the most densely settled large city (population greater than 200,000) in the state of California and the second-most densely populated major city in the United States after New York. San Francisco is the fourth most populous city in California, after Los Angeles, San Diego and San Jose, and the 14th most populous city in the United States—with a Census-estimated 2012 population of 825,863. The city is also the financial and cultural hub of the larger San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland metropolitan area, with a population of 8.4 million.

Bart-logo.svg

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is a rapid transit system serving the San Francisco Bay Area. The heavy-rail public transit and subway system connects San Francisco with cities in the East Bay and suburbs in northern San Mateo County. BART operates five routes on 104 miles (167 km) of line, with 44 stations in four counties. With an average of 373,945 weekday passengers, 176,616 Saturday passengers, and 119,247 Sunday passengers in January 2013, BART is the fifth-busiest heavy rail rapid transit system in the United States.

The Civic Center in San Francisco, California, is an area of a few blocks north of the intersection of Market Street and Van Ness Avenue that contains many of the city's largest government and cultural institutions. It has two large plazas (Civic Center Plaza and United Nations Plaza) and a number of buildings in classical architectural style. The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium (formerly the Exposition Auditorium) is one of the few remaining buildings from the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition. The United Nations Charter was signed in the War Memorial Veterans Building's Herbst Theatre in 1945, leading to the creation of the United Nations. It is also where the 1951 Treaty of San Francisco (the peace treaty that officially ended the Pacific War with the Empire of Japan, which had surrendered in 1945) was signed. The San Francisco Civic Center was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1987, and listed in the National Register of Historic Places on October 10, 1978.

San Francisco Listeni/sæn frənˈsɪsk/, officially the City and County of San Francisco, is the leading financial and cultural center of Northern California and the San Francisco Bay Area.

The only consolidated city-county in California, San Francisco encompasses a land area of about 46.9 square miles (121 km2) on the northern end of the San Francisco Peninsula, giving it a density of about 17,620 people per square mile (6,803 people per km2). It is the most densely settled large city (population greater than 200,000) in the state of California and the second-most densely populated major city in the United States after New York. San Francisco is the fourth most populous city in California, after Los Angeles, San Diego and San Jose, and the 14th most populous city in the United States—with a Census-estimated 2012 population of 825,863. The city is also the financial and cultural hub of the larger San Jose-San Francisco-Oakland metropolitan area, with a population of 8.4 million.

Market Street

Polk Street is a street in San Francisco, California, that travels northward from Market Street to Beach Street and is one of the main thoroughfares of the Polk Gulch neighborhood traversing through the Tenderloin, Nob Hill, and Russian Hill neighborhoods. The street takes its name from former U.S. President James K. Polk. The street remains a busy business district with many restaurants, cafes, home decorating and hardware stores.

The street also has bike lanes, which were approved in 2002. San Francisco bike route 25 runs along Polk Street, and is the only North-South route suitable for casual bicycle travel within at least a mile in either direction. There is an ongoing debate on whether to increase the level of these improvements.

The Market Street Subway is a double-decker tunnel that carries Muni Metro and BART train traffic in San Francisco, California. It runs under the length of Market Street between Embarcadero Station and Castro Street Station. The upper level is used by Muni Metro lines and the lower level is used by BART lines. BART does not run through the whole subway; it turns south and runs under Mission Street southwest of Civic Center Station. The northeastern end of the BART level is connected to the Transbay Tube. On the Muni Metro level, the southwestern end of the Market Street Subway connects to the much-older Twin Peaks Tunnel, and the northeastern end connects to surface tracks along the Embarcadero. The Embarcadero portal, which opened in 1998, is not an original part of the Market Street Subway. It is used by the N Judah and the T Third Street lines.

The K Ingleside, L Taraval, M Ocean View, and T Third Street Muni Metro lines run through the entire subway to its direct connection with the Twin Peaks Tunnel. The J Church and N Judah lines leave the subway via the Duboce portal at Church and Duboce streets.

Disaster Accident

California's transportation system is complex and dynamic. Although known for its car culture and extensive network of freeways and roads, the state also has a vast array of rail, sea, and air transport. Several subway, light rail, and commuter rail networks are found in many of the state's largest population centers. In addition, with the state's location on the West Coast of the United States, several important ports in California handle freight shipments from the Pacific Rim and beyond. A number of airports are also spread out across the state, ranging from small general aviation airports to large international hubs like Los Angeles International Airport and San Francisco International Airport.

However, in a state with over 37 million people, rapid population expansion, and diverse terrain and weather, that system is under pressure to stay ahead of population growth and transportation needs.

California

Civic Center/UN Plaza is a BART and Muni Metro station in the Civic Center of San Francisco. The westernmost of the dual BART/Muni stops on the Market Street Subway, Civic Center/UN Plaza acts as a major hub for passenger movement throughout the San Francisco Bay Area. With 18,432 exits each weekday, it is the fourth-busiest station in the BART system.

Outside, in the United Nations Plaza itself, facing Market Street, there is a fountain and a north-south cross marking its center to be at latitude/longitude coordinates 37°46′48″N 122° 24′49″W. There is a flea market at the plaza or farmer's market every day, year round.

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