Question:

What is the name of the actress who played Judy in the TV series Still Standing?

Answer:

Jami Gertz played Judy Miller in Still Standing. AnswerParty!

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Still Standing
Jami Gertz

Jami Beth Gertz (born October 28, 1965) is an American actress. Gertz is known for her early roles in the films Sixteen Candles, Crossroads, The Lost Boys, Less Than Zero, the 1980s TV series Square Pegs with Sarah Jessica Parker, and 1996's Twister, as well as for her role as Judy Miller in the CBS sitcom Still Standing with Mark Addy.

Gertz
Television in the United States

Television is one of the major mass media of the United States. Household ownership is 96.7% and the majority of households have more than one. Its peak was the 1996-1997 season with 98.4% ownership. [1] As a whole, the television networks of the United States are the largest and most syndicated in the world.

As of August 2013, there are approximately 114,200,000 American households with television.


Judith Miller

Judith Miller (born January 2, 1948) is an American journalist, formerly of the New York Times Washington bureau, who became embroiled in controversy about her coverage of Iraq's Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) program both before and after the 2003 invasion were later discovered to have been based on faulty information, particularly those stories that were based on sourcing from the now-disgraced Ahmed Chalabi. A number of stories she wrote while working for The New York Times were deemed to be inaccurate by her employer. According to some commentators on the left, Miller's Iraq reporting "effectively ended her career as a respectable journalist."

Miller was later involved in the Plame Affair, in which the status of Valerie Plame as a member of the Central Intelligence Agency became widely known. When asked to name her sources, Miller invoked reporter's privilege and refused to reveal her sources in the CIA leak. Miller retired from her job at the New York Times in November 2005. Later she was a contributor to the Fox News Channel and a fellow at the libertarian Manhattan Institute. She is currently a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. On December 29, 2010, numerous media outlets reported that she had signed on as a contributing writer to the conservative magazine Newsmax.

Judy
Cinema of the United States

The cinema of the United States, often generally referred to as Hollywood, has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. Its history is sometimes separated into four main periods: the silent film era, classical Hollywood cinema, New Hollywood, and the contemporary period. While the French Lumière Brothers are generally credited with the birth of modern cinema, it is indisputably American cinema that soon became the most dominant force in an emerging industry. Since the 1920s, the American film industry has grossed more money every year than that of any other country.

In 1878, Eadweard Muybridge demonstrated the power of photography to capture motion. In 1894, the world's first commercial motion picture exhibition was given in New York City, using Thomas Edison's Kinetoscope. The United States was in the forefront of sound film development in the following decades. Since the early 20th century, the U.S. film industry has largely been based in and around Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. Picture City, FL was also a planned site for a movie picture production center in the 1920s, but due to the 1928 Okeechobee hurricane, the idea collapsed and Picture City returned to its original name of Hobe Sound. Director D. W. Griffith was central to the development of film grammar. Orson Welles's Citizen Kane (1941) is frequently cited in critics' polls as the greatest film of all time.

Don't Tell Her It's Me (also known as The Boyfriend School) is a 1990 comedy film starring Shelley Long, Steve Guttenberg, and Jami Gertz. The film was directed by Malcolm Mowbray and written by Sarah Bird (adapted from her novel, The Boyfriend School).

Gus Kubicek (played by Guttenberg) is a depressed and overweight cartoonist who recently won a battle against Hodgkin’s disease. His caring sister Lizzie Pots (Long), a nosy romance novelist, responds to his sadness by trying to set him up with a suitable woman. Yet to do so she must make him seem more dynamic and attractive. When Gus falls in love with Emily (Gertz), he adopts the persona of Lobo Marunga, a leather-clad biker from New Zealand.

Irving Gertz (May 19, 1915 – November 14, 2008) was an American composer recognized for his compositions for many fantasy and horror B-movies and TV series of the 1950s and 1960s.

Gertz was born on May 19, 1915, in Providence, Rhode Island, and played the clarinet, piano, string bass and tuba as a youth, and attended the Providence College of Music. Gertz studied composition privately with composer and music theorist Walter Piston. He was hired by Columbia Pictures in 1938, but left to serve in the United States Army Signal Corps during World War II.

Entertainment Culture
Human Interest

In journalism, a human interest story is a feature story that discusses a person or people in an emotional way. It presents people and their problems, concerns, or achievements in a way that brings about interest, sympathy or motivation in the reader or viewer.

Human interest stories may be "the story behind the story" about an event, organization, or otherwise faceless historical happening, such as about the life of an individual soldier during wartime, an interview with a survivor of a natural disaster, a random act of kindness or profile of someone known for a career achievement.

Sports actress
Judy Miller

Judith Miller (born January 2, 1948) is an American journalist, formerly of the New York Times Washington bureau, who became embroiled in controversy about her coverage of Iraq's Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) program both before and after the 2003 invasion were later discovered to have been based on faulty information, particularly those stories that were based on sourcing from the now-disgraced Ahmed Chalabi. A number of stories she wrote while working for The New York Times were deemed to be inaccurate by her employer. According to some commentators on the left, Miller's Iraq reporting "effectively ended her career as a respectable journalist."

Miller was later involved in the Plame Affair, in which the status of Valerie Plame as a member of the Central Intelligence Agency became widely known. When asked to name her sources, Miller invoked reporter's privilege and refused to reveal her sources in the CIA leak. Miller retired from her job at the New York Times in November 2005. Later she was a contributor to the Fox News Channel and a fellow at the libertarian Manhattan Institute. She is currently a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. On December 29, 2010, numerous media outlets reported that she had signed on as a contributing writer to the conservative magazine Newsmax.

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