Question:

What is the maximum speed can an object fall?

Answer:

The maximum speed at which an object will fall is called “terminal velocity." Theoretically, there is no limit. AnswerParty on!

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Physics Measurement

A physical quantity (or "physical magnitude") is a physical property of a phenomenon, body, or substance, that can be quantified by measurement.

Terminal velocity is simply the fastest speed that a falling object can reach in a certain circumstance. Different objects have different terminal velocities.

The terminal velocity of a falling object is the velocity of the object when the sum of the drag force (Fd) and buoyancy equals the downward force of gravity (FG) acting on the object. Since the net force on the object is zero, the object has zero acceleration.

Velocity Speed

Apparent wind is the wind experienced by a moving object.

The coefficient of restitution (COR) of two colliding objects is a positive real number between 0.0 and 1.0 representing the ratio of speeds after and before an impact, taken along the line of the impact. Pairs of objects with COR = 1 collide elastically, while objects with COR < 1 collide inelastically. For a COR = 0, the objects effectively "stop" at the collision, not bouncing at all. An object (singular) is often described as having a coefficient of restitution as if it were an intrinsic property without reference to a second object, in this case the definition is assumed to be with respect to collisions with a perfectly rigid and elastic object. The Coefficient of Restitution is equal to the Relative Speed After Collision divided by the Relative Speed Before Collision.

\text{Coefficient  of  Restitution } (C_R) = \frac{\text{Relative  Speed  After  Collision}}{\text{Relative  Speed  Before  Collision}}

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Most traditional communications media including telephone, music, film, and television are being reshaped or redefined by the Internet, giving birth to new services such as voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) and Internet Protocol television (IPTV). Newspaper, book and other print publishing are adapting to website technology, or are reshaped into blogging and web feeds. The Internet has enabled and accelerated new forms of human interactions through instant messaging, Internet forums, and social networking. Online shopping has boomed both for major retail outlets and small artisans and traders. Business-to-business and financial services on the Internet affect supply chains across entire industries.

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