Question:

What is the formula for converting grams to pounds?

Answer:

Know that 1 g equals .0022 lb. and that 1 lb. equals 453.6 g. These are the conversion factors for your formulas.Multiply your number of grams by the conversion factor .0022 to calculate the equivalent weight in pounds. The number of grams X .0022 =

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The system of imperial units or the imperial system (also known as British Imperial) is the system of units first defined in the British Weights and Measures Act of 1824, which was later refined and reduced. The system came into official use across the British Empire. By the late 20th century, most nations of the former empire had officially adopted the metric system as their main system of measurement, but some Imperial units are still used in the United Kingdom and Canada.

Pound

Conversion of units is the conversion between different units of measurement for the same quantity, typically through multiplicative conversion factors.

Gram

Equivalent weight (also known as gram equivalent) is a term which has been used in several contexts in chemistry. In its most general usage, it is the mass of one equivalent, that is the mass of a given substance which will:

Equivalent weight has the dimensions and units of mass, unlike atomic weight, which is dimensionless. Equivalent weights were originally determined by experiment, but (insofar as they are still used) are now derived from molar masses. Additionally, the equivalent weight of a compound can be calculated by dividing the molecular weight by the number of positive or negative electrical charges that result from the dissolution of the compound.

A conversion factor changes something to a different version or form. A factor is something that brings results or a cause, while conversion is an action of changing the "version" of a thing.

In mathematics, specifically algebra, a conversion factor is used to convert a measured quantity to a different unit of measure without changing the relative amount. To accomplish this, a ratio (fraction) is established that equals one (1). In the ratio, the conversion factor is a multiplier that, when applied to the larger unit, converts the larger unit into the smaller unit, by multiplication with the measured amount.

Textile yarns are measured in various units, such as: the denier and tex (linear mass density of fibres), super S (fineness of wool fiber), worsted count, woolen count, cotton count (or Number English Ne), Number metric (Nm) and yield (the inverse of denier and tex). Yarn is spun thread used for knitting, weaving, or sewing. Thread is a long, thin strand of cotton, nylon, or other fibers used in sewing or weaving. Both yarn and thread are measured in terms of cotton count and yarn density. Fabric is cloth, typically produced by weaving or knitting textile fibers, and is measured in units such as mommes (momme is a number that equals the weight in pounds of a piece of silk if it were sized 45 inches by 100 yards), thread count (a measure of the coarseness or fineness of fabric), ends per inch (e.p.i), and picks per inch (p.p.i).

Measurement

In physics, mass (from Greek μᾶζα "barley cake, lump [of dough]") is a property of a physical system or body, giving rise to the phenomena of the body's resistance to being accelerated by a force and the strength of its mutual gravitational attraction with other bodies. Instruments such as mass balances or scales use those phenomena to measure mass. The SI unit of mass is the kilogram (kg).

For everyday objects and energies well-described by Newtonian physics, mass has also been said to represent an amount of matter, but this view breaks down, for example, at very high speeds or for subatomic particles. Holding true more generally, any body having mass has an equivalent amount of energy, and all forms of energy resist acceleration by a force and have gravitational attraction; the term matter has no universally-agreed definition under this modern view.

United States customary units are a system of measurements commonly used in the United States. The U.S. customary system developed from English units which were in use in the British Empire before American independence. Consequently most U.S. units are virtually identical to the British imperial units. However, the British system was overhauled in 1824, changing the definitions of some units used there, so several differences exist between the two systems.

The majority of U.S. customary units were redefined in terms of the meter and the kilogram with the Mendenhall Order of 1893, and in practice, for many years before. These definitions were refined by the international yard and pound agreement of 1959. The U.S. primarily uses customary units in its commercial activities, while science, medicine, government, and many sectors of industry use metric units. The SI metric system, or International System of Units is preferred for many uses by NIST

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