Question:

What is the drug in Mucinex that makes you sick?

Answer:

Mucinex D contains a combination of guaifenesin and pseudoephedrine. Guaifenesin is an expectorant to help loosen congestion.

More Info:

Duraphen is a combination drug, containing Guaifenesin (an expectorant), which helps loosen chest congestion, making coughs more productive, and Phenylephrine (a decongestant), that shrinks blood vessels in the nose, improving symptoms of nasal congestion. This combination of drugs is used primarily to treat allergic rhinitis, and chest congestion caused by allergies, the common cold or flu.
Guaifenesin protocol is an alternative treatment for fibromyalgia proposed in the 1990s by R. Paul St. Amand. The proposed treatment involves three parts: titrating to the proper guaifenesin dosage, avoiding salicylates, and following a low-carbohydrate diet if the patient is hypoglycemic. Guaifenesin has not been approved by the FDA for the treatment of fibromyalgia, and the protocol has not been shown to be effective in clinical trials. Despite the demonstrated lack of clinical efficacy, the protocol has been adopted by many due to anecdotal evidence of success. The dosage is individually determined by slowly titrating the dosage up until a worsening of symptoms is noticed and there is a decrease of the lesions that can be palpated in the muscles. Patients begin with 300 mg twice a day and increase from there. The guaifenesin should be pure guaifenesin and not a preparation including other medications. Salicylates in even tiny amounts blocks guaifenesin from being absorbed by the kidneys. It is present in a large variety of foods. It can also be found in drugs such as aspirin, Salsalate, Disalcid, Anacin, and Excedrin. Plants produce salicylic acid, so herbal medications must be avoided as well as plant oils, gels and extracts in cosmetics and any product that touches the skin. These ingredients include aloe, castor oil, camphor, and mint. Any plants can be eaten, however, because the small amount of salicylic acid present in food is broken down in the digestive system and tagged with glycine by the liver before reaching the kidneys. The exception to this rule is mint. Even a small dose of any member of the mint family will block guaifenesin absorption in the kidneys. This theory involves phosphate accumulation in cells that eventually reach a level to impede the ATP process, possibly caused by a kidney dysfunction or missing enzyme that prevents the removal of excess phosphates from the blood stream. This theory posits that fibromyalgia is an inherited disorder, and that phosphate build up in cells is gradual (but can be accelerated by trauma or illness). Calcium is required to buffer the excess phosphate when it enters the cells. The additional phosphate slows down the ATP process; however the excess calcium prods the cell to action. The causative mechanism in the kidneys is unknown. The phosphate build-up theory is said to explain the myriad symptoms present in fibromyalgia and provides an underlying cause, but remains theoretical; there is no clinical evidence that the phosphate build-up theory is correct, or that Guaifenesin protocol is effective. Results of the only reported randomized clinical trial in 1996 found that guaifenesin had no significant effects on pain, other symptoms, or laboratory measures (serum and urinary levels of uric acid and phosphate) over 12 months in a sample of people diagnosed with fibromyalgia syndrome, The lead author of the study has suggested a number of reasons why some patients may have previously reported benefits on this protocol, concluding "St. Amand has unknowingly used guaifenesin as a powerful focus in a program of cognitive behavioral therapy, in which his empathy, enthusiasm and charisma were the real instruments in effecting a beneficial change." St. Amand, who participated as a "Study Advisor" to this clinical trial, has stated that the study did not control for salicylate use, and therefore did not study the protocol as a whole. He has recommended a follow-up study be conducted which controls for all elements of the protocol. The lead author of the study counters that none of the subjects exhibited any signs of salicylate use. This theory arose when St. Amand noticed that patients with fibromyalgia symptoms had an increase of tartar on the teeth in the form of calcium phosphate. Crystals are also often found on urinalysis, which further points to calcium phosphate, and muscle biopsies show an steady state of phosphate in the cytosol as well as a dearth of ATP and phosphocreatine. The implication is that insufficient energy formation is the basis for the generalized cellular fatigue expressed in many tissues of fibromyalgia. Lesions of muscles, tendons, and ligaments can be felt by simple palpation. St. Amand calls this 'mapping' and uses it to confirm the diagnosis and in followup reversal of fibromyalgia. He feels that a genetically induced retention of phosphate also draws excess quantities of calcium into cells and exhorts them into overdrive. Contracted musculoskeletal tissues are the result and they produce the palpable lesions. The treatment was discovered serendipitously when the physician found that uricosuric drugs for treating gout also coincided with relief of fibromyalgia symptoms. Guaifenesin is mildly uricosuric but, unlike standard uricosuric drugs, has almost no side-effects. St. Amand therefore began to study whether guaifenesin might relieve the symptoms of fibromyalgia while causing fewer side-effects than the earlier medications.
Duraphen Forte is a combination drug used to treat cold, flu and allergy symptoms such as congestion and coughs. It contains the generic drugs dextromethorphan, guaifenesin and phenylephrine.
InChI=1S/C7H8O5S/c1-12-7-5(8)3-2-4-6(7)13(9,10)11/h2-4,8H,1H3,(H,9,10,11)/p-1Yes 
Key:PSWOVMUIOCKEJX-UHFFFAOYSA-MYes  Guaiacolsulfonate (aka sulfoguaiacolum) is an aromatic sulfonic acid used in medicine as an expectorant.

M: RES anat (n, x, l, c)/phys/devp noco (c, p)/cong/tumr, sysi/epon, injr proc, drug (R1/2/3/5/6/7)
InChI=1S/C10H14O/c1-6-4-9(11)8-5-7(6)10(8,2)3/h4,7-8H,5H2,1-3H3/t7-,8+/m0/s1Yes 
Key:DCSCXTJOXBUFGB-JGVFFNPUSA-NYes  Levoverbenone is an expectorant. It is the L-isomer of verbenone.
M: RES anat (n, x, l, c)/phys/devp noco (c, p)/cong/tumr, sysi/epon, injr proc, drug (R1/2/3/5/6/7)
Robitussin DAC (more commonly known as its generic form, Cheratussin DAC) is a narcotic cold medicine, which is available in the United States in a solution. A version without pseudoephedrine is called Robitussin AC. Robitussin products are available over the counter in many countries worldwide, including the Philippines, Thailand, and Nicaragua. Robitussin DAC/AC is available in the United States by prescription only. The manufacturing facility for Robitussin is located on Darbytown Road in Richmond, Virginia at the same location as the prior manufacturer, AH Robins whilst the generic versions are manufactured by Qualitest. Robitussin was originally produced by AH Robins of Richmond, Virginia. AH Robins was purchased by American Home Products (AHP) in the late 1980s. AHP later changed its name to Wyeth. Wyeth put the manufacturing and marketing of the brand under its Whitehall-Robins Healthcare division. Production was taken over by Pfizer when it acquired Wyeth in 2009. During the 1970s and early 1980s, Merrell Dow Pharmaceuticals sold similar cough syrups (differing slightly in flavor, but pharmacologically identical) under the names "2/G" (a reference to "glyceryl guaiacolate," an older name for guaifenesin) for the base expectorant formulation, and "2G/DM" for the guaifenesin/dextromethorphan formulation. Each 5 mL of Robitussin DAC contains 10 mg of codeine (an opiate), 100 mg of guaifenesin (an expectorant), and 30 mg of pseudoephedrine (a decongestant). Robitussin DAC is used to treat acute cough, mucus buildup and nasal congestion. Because this medicine contains codeine, it is usually only prescribed when a patient has a painful and persistent cough, and/or one that interferes with the patient's sleep cycle. Robitussin DAC should not be used by anyone who is allergic to any of the ingredients in it. Overdose may cause breathing problems because of the presence of the opiate codeine. Overdose may also cause cardiac arrhythmia. Robitussin AC is Robitussin DAC without the Pseudoephedrine. The taste mimics cherries but is said to have an unpleasant after-taste. The version of Robitussin AC/Cheratussin AC with Promethazine is usually flavored peach-mint or grape/menthol. These syrups are purple instead of red. Robitussin AC and Cheratussin AC have a 3.5% alcohol content, and the versions with promethazine have 7% alcohol. An early reference to Robitussin being used as a recreational drug appears in the 1967 song "Hey Grandma" by Moby Grape. Robitussin (spelled as "Robotussin" to avoid trademark issues) is referenced in the mc chris song "The Tussin (Robotussin)". Tussin, an off-brand of Robitussin, was the basis of a running gag by Chris Rock in the 1999 DVD Bigger and Blacker in reference to its use when he was growing up, so the children did not have to go to the doctor. Robitussin is also mentioned often in the show Everybody Hates Chris, and is used to treat any ailment that the family members may have. One of the characters in Douglas Coupland's 2006 novel jPod (and the CBC television show of the same name) uses "Chugatussin" as means of getting high, referring to this as "getting 'tussed up." It appears too in Microserfs, another novel of the same author, when one of the characters is addicted to "PayLess Tussin". Robitussin was featured on an episode of Dr. Phil that dealt with drug addiction. An episode of the TV series House, "Ignorance is Bliss", dealt with Robitussin abuse, using the term "Robotripping". It is also referenced in the song "Bass Down Low" by Dev featuring The Cataracs in the lyrics "Straight buzzin', Robitussin Wanna get your mitts in my oven." A bottle of Robitussin is seen in video to the song Naked from Dev debut album The Night the Sun Came Up (2011) featuring Enrique Iglesias In the sitcom 2 Broke Girls, Season 2, Max refers to Robotussin as the only thing she has ever loved. She also claims to have invented the Robotussin smoothie in 2006, which made that "pretty much a blackout year".
InChI=1S/C10H14O4/c1-13-9-4-2-3-5-10(9)14-7-8(12)6-11/h2-5,8,11-12H,6-7H2,1H3Yes 
Key:HSRJKNPTNIJEKV-UHFFFAOYSA-NYes  Guaifenesin INN or guaiphenesin (former BAN), also glyceryl guaiacolate, is an expectorant drug sold over the counter and usually taken orally to assist the bringing up (expectoration) of phlegm from the airways in acute respiratory tract infections. Similar medicines derived from the guaiac tree were in use as a generic remedy by American Indians when explorers reached North America in the 16th century. The Spanish encountered guaiacum wood "when they conquered Santo Domingo; it was soon brought back to Europe, where it acquired an immense reputation in the sixteenth century as a cure for syphilis and certain other diseases..." The 1955 edition of the Textbook of Pharmacognosy states: "Guaiacum has a local stimulant action which is sometimes useful in sore throat. The resin is used in chronic gout and rheumatism, whilst the wood is an ingredient in the compound concentrated solution of sarsaparilla, which was formerly much used as an alternative in syphilis." Guaifenesin was first approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1952. Although previously deemed "Generally Regarded as Safe" in its original approval, the drug received a New Drug Application for the extended-release version, which won approval on July 12, 2002. Because of this, the FDA then issued letters to other manufacturers of timed-release guaifenesin to stop marketing their unapproved versions, leaving Adams Respiratory Therapeutics in control of the market. Adams was subsequently acquired by Reckitt Benckiser, based on the strength of the marketing generated by Adams' Mucinex brand.
Guaifenesin is sold as pills or syrups under many brand names. Single-ingredient formulations of guaifenesin are available, and it is also included in many other over-the-counter cough and cold remedy combinations (usually in conjunction with dextromethorphan and/or acetaminophen and/or ephedrine/pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine). Guaifenesin is a component of Mucinex, Robitussin DAC, Cheratussin DAC, Robitussin AC, Cheratussin AC, Benylin, Buckley's, DayQuil Mucus Control, Meltus, and Bidex 400, as well as Buckley's Cough, Mucus & Phlegm, Walmart Equate Tussin, and Cough Be Gone. The principal use of guaifenesin is in the treatment of coughing. A Cochrane Collaboration meta-analysis of over-the-counter medicines for acute cough in children and adults concluded that there was not enough high quality clinical data to prove or disprove the effectiveness of any examined drug including guaifenesin. Guaifenesin is sometimes combined with dextromethorphan, an antitussive.][ The guaifenesin protocol uses guaifenesin to purportedly treat fibromyalgia, despite the fact that a one-year double-blind study indicates that the treatment performs no better than placebo. Guaifenesin has not been approved by the FDA for the treatment of fibromyalgia. Based on a small, non-blinded study, Guaifenesin has been promoted to facilitiate conception, by thinning and increasing cervical mucus, during the few days before ovulation. Guaifenesin is thought to act as an expectorant by increasing the volume and reducing the viscosity of secretions in the trachea and bronchi. It also stimulates the flow of respiratory tract secretions, allowing ciliary movement to carry the loosened secretions upward toward the pharynx. Thus, it may increase the efficiency of the cough reflex and facilitate removal of the secretions; however, objective evidence for this is limited and conflicting.][ Side-effects of guaifenesin include nausea, vomiting, formation of kidney stones, diarrhea, and constipation. Nausea and vomiting can be reduced by taking guaifenesin with meals. The risk of forming kidney stones during prolonged use can be reduced by maintaining good hydration and increasing the pH of urine. Rarely, severe allergic reactions may occur, including a rash or swelling of the lips or face, which may require urgent medical assistance. Mild dry mouth or chapped lips may also occur when taking this medication. Drinking a glass of water is recommended each time one takes guaifenesin. Guaifenesin "increases the analgesic effect of paracetamol (acetaminophen) and aspirin, increases the sedative effects of alcohol, tranquilisers, sleep-pills and total anesthetics. Guaifenesin increases the effects of medication that decrease muscle tone. Guaifenesin effects are increased by lithium and magnesium." Guaifenesin's neurological properties first became known in the late 1940s. Guaifenesin is a centrally acting muscle relaxant used routinely in large-animal veterinary surgery. Guaifenesin is used in combination with, for example, propofol, since guaifenesin does not produce analgesia nor does it produce unconsciousness. M: JNT anat (h/c, u, t, l)/phys noco (arth/defr/back/soft)/cong, sysi/epon, injr proc, drug (M01C, M4) M: RES anat (n, x, l, c)/phys/devp noco (c, p)/cong/tumr, sysi/epon, injr proc, drug (R1/2/3/5/6/7)

InChI=1S/C10H14O4/c1-13-9-4-2-3-5-10(9)14-7-8(12)6-11/h2-5,8,11-12H,6-7H2,1H3YYes 
Key:HSRJKNPTNIJEKV-UHFFFAOYSA-NYYes 

Guaifenesin INN /ɡwˈfɛnɨsɪn/ or guaiphenesin (former BAN), also glyceryl guaiacolate, is an expectorant drug sold over the counter and usually taken orally to assist the bringing up (expectoration) of phlegm from the airways in acute respiratory tract infections.

Mucinex D

A combination drug most commonly refers to a fixed-dose combination (FDC), which is a formulation including two or more active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) combined in a single dosage form, which is manufactured and distributed in certain respective fixed doses. Terms like "combination drug" or "combination drug product" can be common shorthand for a FDC product (since most combination drug products are currently FDCs), although the latter is more precise if in fact referring to a mass-produced product having a predetermined combination of drugs and respective dosages (as opposed to customized polypharmacy via compounding). And it should also be distinguished from the term "combination product" in medical contexts, which without further specification can refer to products that combine different types of medical products - such as device/drug combinations as opposed to drug/drug combinations. Note that when a combination drug product (whether fixed-dose or not) is a "pill" (i.e., a tablet or capsule), then it is also a kind of "polypill" or combopill.

Initially, fixed-dose combination drug products were developed to target a single disease (such as with antiretroviral FDCs used against AIDS). However, FDCs may also target multiple diseases/conditions, such as Caduet (atorvastatin/amlodipine) or Exforge (amlodipine/valsartan). In cases of FDCs targeting multiple conditions, such conditions might often be related — in order to increase the number of prospective patients who might be likely to utilize a given FDC product. This is because each FDC product is mass-produced, and thus typically requires having a critical mass of potentially applicable patients in order to justify its manufacture, distribution, stocking, etc.

Mucokinetics are a class of drugs which aid in the clearance of mucus from the airways, lungs, bronchi, and trachea. Such drugs can be further categorized by their mechanism of action.

In general, clearance ability is hampered by bonding to surfaces (stickiness) and by the viscosity of mucous secretions in the lungs. In turn, the viscosity is dependent upon the concentration of mucoprotein in the secretions.

A diol is a chemical compound containing two hydroxyl groups (—OH groups). This pairing of functional groups is pervasive and many subcategories have been identified. The most common industrial diol is ethylene glycol. Examples of diols in which the hydroxyl functional groups are more widely separated include 1,4-butanediol HO—(CH2)4—OH and bisphenol A, and propylene-1,3-diol or beta propylene glycol, HO-CH2-CH2-CH2-OH.

InChI=1S/C10H14O4/c1-13-9-4-2-3-5-10(9)14-7-8(12)6-11/h2-5,8,11-12H,6-7H2,1H3YYes 
Key:HSRJKNPTNIJEKV-UHFFFAOYSA-NYYes 

Guaifenesin INN /ɡwˈfɛnɨsɪn/ or guaiphenesin (former BAN), also glyceryl guaiacolate, is an expectorant drug sold over the counter and usually taken orally to assist the bringing up (expectoration) of phlegm from the airways in acute respiratory tract infections.

7,9-Dihydro-1H-purine-2,6,8(3H)-trione]citation needed[

2,6,8-Trioxypurine]citation needed[

Mucokinetics are a class of drugs which aid in the clearance of mucus from the airways, lungs, bronchi, and trachea. Such drugs can be further categorized by their mechanism of action.

In general, clearance ability is hampered by bonding to surfaces (stickiness) and by the viscosity of mucous secretions in the lungs. In turn, the viscosity is dependent upon the concentration of mucoprotein in the secretions.

InChI=1S/C10H15NO/c1-8(11-2)10(12)9-6-4-3-5-7-9/h3-8,10-12H,1-2H3/t8-,10+/m0/s1YYes 
Key:KWGRBVOPPLSCSI-WCBMZHEXSA-NYYes 

Pseudoephedrine (/ˌsjuːd.ɨˈfɛdrɪn/ or /ˌsjuːdˈɛfɨdrn/; PSE) is a sympathomimetic drug of the phenethylamine and amphetamine chemical classes. It may be used as a nasal/sinus decongestant, as a stimulant, or as a wakefulness-promoting agent.

InChI=1S/C10H15NO/c1-8(11-2)10(12)9-6-4-3-5-7-9/h3-8,10-12H,1-2H3/t8-,10-/m0/s1YYes 
Key:KWGRBVOPPLSCSI-WPRPVWTQSA-NYYes 

Ephedrine (/ɨˈfɛdrɪn/ or /ˈɛfɨdrn/; not to be confused with ephedrone) is a sympathomimetic amine commonly used as a stimulant, appetite suppressant, concentration aid, decongestant, and to treat hypotension associated with anaesthesia.

Duraphen Medicine

A decongestant or nasal decongestant is a type of pharmaceutical drug that is used to relieve nasal congestion in the upper respiratory tract. The active ingredient in most decongestants is either pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine.

The vast majority of decongestants act via enhancing norepinephrine (noradrenaline) and epinephrine (adrenaline) or adrenergic activity by stimulating the α-adrenergic receptors. This induces vasoconstriction of the blood vessels in the nose, throat, and paranasal sinuses, which results in reduced inflammation (swelling) and mucus formation in these areas.

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