Question:

What is the difference between the dewey decimal system, and the library of Congress classification system?

Answer:

The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a classification system that divides all knowledge into twenty-one basic classes, each identified by a single letter of the alphabet, instead of into subject categories. AnswerParty!

More Info:

The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), or Dewey Decimal System, is a proprietary library classification system first published by Melvil Dewey in 1876. It has been revised and expanded through 23 major editions, the latest issued in 2011. The classification was notable in its time because it introduced the concepts of relative location and relative index. It makes use of three-digit Arabic numerals for main classes, with decimals as expansions for more detail.

A library assigns a Dewey Decimal number that unambiguously locates a particular volume in a position relative to other books in the library. This makes it easy to find any particular book and return it to its proper place on the library shelves. The system is used in 200,000 libraries in at least 135 countries.

Knowledge representation (KR) is an area of artificial intelligence research aimed at representing knowledge in symbols to facilitate inferencing from those knowledge elements, creating new elements of knowledge. The KR can be made to be independent of the underlying knowledge model or knowledge base system (KBS) such as a semantic network.

Science

Library science (often termed library studies or library and information science) is an interdisciplinary or multidisciplinary field that applies the practices, perspectives, and tools of management, information technology, education, and other areas to libraries; the collection, organization, preservation, and dissemination of information resources; and the political economy of information. The first American school for library science was founded by Melvil Dewey at Columbia University in 1887.

Historically, library science has also included archival science. This includes how information resources are organized to serve the needs of select user group, how people interact with classification systems and technology, how information is acquired, evaluated and applied by people in and outside of libraries as well as cross-culturally, how people are trained and educated for careers in libraries, the ethics that guide library service and organization, the legal status of libraries and information resources, and the applied science of computer technology used in documentation and records management.

Information

The Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC), or Dewey Decimal System, is a proprietary library classification system first published by Melvil Dewey in 1876. It has been revised and expanded through 23 major editions, the latest issued in 2011. The classification was notable in its time because it introduced the concepts of relative location and relative index. It makes use of three-digit Arabic numerals for main classes, with decimals as expansions for more detail.

A library assigns a Dewey Decimal number that unambiguously locates a particular volume in a position relative to other books in the library. This makes it easy to find any particular book and return it to its proper place on the library shelves. The system is used in 200,000 libraries in at least 135 countries.

Subject Library Dewey

A library classification is a system of coding, assorting and organizing documents, library materials or any information (books, serials, audiovisual materials, computer files, maps, manuscripts, realia) according to their subject and allocating a call number]clarification needed[ to that information resource. Bibliographic classification systems group entities together that are relevant the same subject, typically arranged in a hierarchical tree structure (like classification systems used in biology). A different kind of classification system, called a faceted classification system, is also widely used which allows the assignment of multiple classifications to an object, enabling the classifications to be ordered in multiple ways.

The Cutter Expansive Classification system is a library classification system devised by Charles Ammi Cutter. The system was the basis for the top categories of the Library of Congress Classification.

Other

The Library of Congress Classification (LCC) is a system of library classification developed by the Library of Congress. It is used by most research and academic libraries in the U.S. and several other countries. Most public libraries and small academic libraries continue to use the older Dewey Decimal Classification (DDC).

LCC should not be confused with LCCN, the system of Library of Congress Control Numbers assigned to all books (and authors), which also defines URLs of their online catalog entries, such as "82006074" and "http://lccn.loc.gov/82006074". The Classification is also distinct from Library of Congress Subject Headings, the system of labels such as "Boarding schools" and "Boarding schools—Fiction" that describe contents systematically. Finally, the classifications may be distinguished from the call numbers assigned to particular copies of books in the collection, such as "PZ7.J684 Wj 1982 FT MEADE Copy 1" where the classification is "PZ7.J684 Wj 1982".

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