Question:

What is the check engine light code 0456 in a 2002 dodge neon se?

Answer:

Check engine light on a 2002 Dodge Neon SE with the code 0456 is the EVAP Purge sensor and Purge valve. This could also be coming on if your gas cap is not closed good enough or if the gas cap is too old.

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The Hawaii Gas Cap Law is a state law setting a legal limit on wholesale gasoline prices, or the maximum amount that may be charged for producing gasoline and delivering it to a service station. Under the law, the gas cap is set weekly by the Hawaii Public Utilities Commission (PUC) based on average spot prices for regular unleaded gasoline in three U.S. markets, New York Harbor, the Gulf Coast, and Los Angeles.

The gas cap has a baseline price that is the same throughout Hawaii, but the total wholesale price varies depending on seven zones, reflecting the differing costs of delivery to various locations throughout the state.

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The Plymouth/Dodge Neon, sold in Europe, Mexico, Canada, and elsewhere outside the United States as the Chrysler Neon, is a compact front wheel drive car introduced in January 1994 for the 1995 model year by Chrysler Corporation's Dodge and Plymouth brands. It was branded as a Chrysler model in Japan, Europe, and Australia export markets (where it was the first car to be sold as a Chrysler since 1981), as well as in Mexico, Canada, and Egypt. It replaced the Dodge Shadow and Plymouth Sundance & Duster models and the Dodge & Plymouth Colt. The two-door model also replaced the Plymouth Laser in Plymouth's lineup. The Neon was offered in multiple versions and configurations over its production life, which ended on September 23, 2005.

The first generation Neon was introduced in January 1994 and manufactured until August 1999. It was available as a four-door sedan and a two-door coupe. Available engines were SOHC and DOHC versions of Chrysler's 2.0 L 4-cylinder engine producing 132 hp (98 kW) at 6000 rpm and 129 lb·ft (175 N·m) at 5000 rpm or 150 hp (110 kW) at 6500 rpm and 133 lb·ft (180 N·m) at 5600 rpm, respectively; transaxle options were a 3-speed Torqueflite automatic or a five-speed manual.

Sedans Dodge

A malfunction indicator lamp (MIL), also known as a check engine light, is a tell-tale to indicate malfunction of a computerized engine management system. It is found on the instrument panel of most automobiles. When illuminated, it is typically either an amber or red color. On vehicles equipped with OBD-II, the light has two stages: steady (indicating a minor fault such as a loose gas cap or failing oxygen sensor) and flashing (indicating a severe fault, that could potentially damage the catalytic converter if left uncorrected for an extended period). When the MIL is lit, the engine control unit stores a fault code related to the malfunction, which can be retrieved with a scan tool and used for further diagnosis. The malfunction indicator lamp usually bears the legend check engine, service engine soon, or a pictogram of an engine. In the United States, specific functions are required of the MIL by EPA regulations.

The MIL appeared in the early 80s along with computerized engine controls. Even the earliest systems, such as GM's CCC (Computer Command Control) system had self diagnosis functionality. When the computer detected a fault, it illuminated the MIL. Up until OBDII, on most cars the MIL could output codes, when two pins on the ALDL are jumped, the light would flash the codes, for instance (blink) (pause) (blink) (blink) for code 12. Some manufacturers, such as Honda, retained this feature even after OBDII.

Valve Transport Private transport

A compact car (North America), or small family car in British acceptation, is a classification of cars that are larger than a subcompact car but smaller than a mid-size car, equating roughly to the C-segment in Europe.

Current compact car size, as defined by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), for the US and for international models respectively, is approximately 4,100 mm (161 in) and 4,450 mm (175 in) long for hatchbacks, or 4,400 mm (173 in) and 4,750 mm (187 in) long for convertibles, sedans (saloon) or station wagons (estate car). Multi-purpose vehicles and sport utility vehicles based on small family cars (often called compact MPVs and compact SUVs) have similar sizes, ranging from 4,200 mm (165 in) to 4,500 mm (177 in) in the U.S., and from 4,400 mm (173 in) to 4,700 mm (185 in) in international-based models.

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