Question:

What is the biggest minority race in the US?

Answer:

White Americans (non-Hispanic/Latino and Hispanic/Latino) are the racial majority, with an 80% share of the U.S. population

More Info:

The United States of America (USA), commonly referred to as the United States (US), America, or simply the States, is a federal republic consisting of 50 states, 16 territories, a federal district, and various overseas extraterritorial jurisdictions. The 48 contiguous states and the federal district of Washington, D.C., are in central North America between Canada and Mexico. The state of Alaska is the northwestern part of North America and the state of Hawaii is an archipelago in the mid-Pacific. The country also has five populated and nine unpopulated territories in the Pacific and the Caribbean. At 3.79 million square miles (9.83 million km2) in total and with around 316 million people, the United States is the fourth-largest country by total area and third largest by population. It is one of the world's most ethnically diverse and multicultural nations, the product of large-scale immigration from many countries. The geography and climate of the United States is also extremely diverse, and it is home to a wide variety of wildlife.

Paleo-indians migrated from Asia to what is now the US mainland around 15,000 years ago, with European colonization beginning in the 16th century. The United States emerged from 13 British colonies located along the Atlantic seaboard. Disputes between Great Britain and these colonies led to the American Revolution. On July 4, 1776, delegates from the 13 colonies unanimously issued the Declaration of Independence. The ensuing war ended in 1783 with the recognition of independence of the United States from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and was the first successful war of independence against a European colonial empire. The current Constitution was adopted on September 17, 1787. The first 10 amendments, collectively named the Bill of Rights, were ratified in 1791 and guarantee many fundamental civil rights and freedoms.


Demographics of the United States

As of January 1, 2013, the United States had a total resident population of 317,055,000, making it the third-most populous country in the world. It is very urbanized, with 82% residing in cities and suburbs as of 2008 (the worldwide urban rate is 50.5%). Much of the country is nearly uninhabited. California and Texas are the most populous states, as the mean center of U.S. population has consistently shifted westward and southward. New York City is the most populous city in the United States.

The total fertility rate in the United States estimated for 2012 is 1.88 children per woman, which is below the replacement fertility rate of approximately 2.1. Compared to other Western countries, in 2011, U.S. fertility rate was lower than that of France (2.02) and the United Kingdom (1.97). However, U.S. population growth is among the highest in industrialized countries, because the differences in fertility rates are less than the differences in immigration levels, which are higher in the U.S. The United States Census Bureau shows population increase of 0.75% for the twelve-month period ending in July 2012. Though high by industrialized country standards, this is below the world average annual rate of 1.1%.


Hispanic and Latino American

Hispanic and Latino Americans are an ethnolinguistic group of citizens of the United States with origins in the countries of Latin America or the Iberian peninsula. More generally it includes all persons in the United States who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino. Reflecting especially the Latin American population, which has origins in all the continents and many ancestries, Hispanic/Latino Americans are very racially diverse, and as a result form an ethnic category, rather than a race.

While the two terms are sometimes used interchangeably, Hispanic is a narrower term which mostly refers to persons of Spanish-speaking origin or ancestry, while Latino is more frequently used to refer more generally to anyone of Latin American origin or ancestry, including Brazilians. Hispanic thus includes persons from Spain and Spanish-speaking Latin Americans excluding Brazilians (who speak Portuguese) while Latino excludes persons from Spain but includes both Spanish-speaking and Portuguese-speaking Latin Americans. Because Brazil's population of 191,000,000 is several times larger than Spain's population of 47,000,000 and also because there are more Brazilian Americans (between 360,000 and 1,100,000 as of 2010) than Spanish Americans (about 85,000 as of 2010) in the United States, Latino is a broader term encompassing more people. The choice between the terms Latino and Hispanic among those of Spanish-speaking origin is also associated with location: persons of Spanish-speaking origins residing in the eastern United States tend to prefer the term Hispanic, whereas those in the West tend to prefer Latino.


Race in the United States

The United States has a racially and ethnically diverse population. The census officially recognizes six ethnic and racial categories: White American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, African American, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, and people of two or more races; a race called "Some other race" is also used in the census and other surveys, but is not official. The United States Census Bureau also classifies Americans as "Hispanic or Latino" and "Not Hispanic or Latino", which identifies Hispanic and Latino Americans as a racially diverse ethnicity that composes the largest minority group in the nation.

White Americans (non-Hispanic/Latino and Hispanic/Latino) are the racial majority, with a 72% share of the U.S. population, according to the 2010 US Census. Hispanic and Latino Americans amount to 15% of the population, making up the largest minority. African Americans are the largest racial minority, amounting to nearly 13% of the population. The White, non-Hispanic or Latino population make up 63% of the nation's total.

The United States has a racially and ethnically diverse population. The census officially recognizes six ethnic and racial categories: White American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, African American, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander, and people of two or more races; a race called "Some other race" is also used in the census and other surveys, but is not official. The United States Census Bureau also classifies Americans as "Hispanic or Latino" and "Not Hispanic or Latino", which identifies Hispanic and Latino Americans as a racially diverse ethnicity that composes the largest minority group in the nation.

White Americans (non-Hispanic/Latino and Hispanic/Latino) are the racial majority, with a 72% share of the U.S. population, according to the 2010 US Census. Hispanic and Latino Americans amount to 15% of the population, making up the largest minority. African Americans are the largest racial minority, amounting to nearly 13% of the population. The White, non-Hispanic or Latino population make up 63% of the nation's total.

The Latino Community Foundation was founded in 1989 under the premise of being an organization that would help Hispanics and Latinos help themselves. Founded by Mr. Hugo Morales, because of the rapidly growing population of Hispanics and Latinos in the US, the organization is an invaluable resource to the Hispanic/Latino community of California. There are 38.8 million Hispanics and Latinos in the U.S., who represent a population growth in excess of 10% in two years. California is home to the majority of U.S. Hispanics and Latinos: 11 million Hispanics and Latinos, 1/3 of California's population and 1/3 of the U.S. Hispanic/Latino population. Hispanics and Latinos are rapidly immersing themselves into the market economy, housing sector, public education, and health care spheres of the United States. The dynamic growth of the Hispanic population requires leaders that understand the issues affecting U.S. Hispanics and Latinos. Therefore, the Hispanic/Latino Community Foundation “endeavors to support Hispanics and Latinos in building a strong future though personal, academic, and financial development”. The Latino Community Foundation partners with, and advertises, organizations which it feels are committed to helping create solutions to problems within the Hispanic/Latino community. Some of the affiliated organizations are:

The Latino Community Foundation based out of San Francisco will engage Hispanic/Latino-led organizations, corporations, foundations, other private organizations, and government institutions in a collaborative effort to address the critical issues facing our young families with children ages 0–5. The program began in 2008 and hopes to raise and award at least $1 million Hispanic/Latino-based, youth serving, nonprofit organizations in the greater Bay Area.

Hispanic

The Spanish diaspora consists of Spanish people and their descendants who emigrated from Spain. The diaspora is concentrated in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela and other parts of Latin America, and to a lesser extent, the United States, Canada and continental Europe.

Castile, under the reign of Henry III began the colonization of the Canary Islands in 1402, authorizing under feudal agreement to Norman noblemen Jean de Béthencourt. The conquest of the Canary Islands, inhabited by Guanche people, was only finished when the armies of the Crown of Castille won, in long and bloody wars, the islands of Gran Canaria (1478–1483), La Palma (1492–1493) and Tenerife (1494–1496).

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