Question:

What is the balanced chemical equation for barium chloride and sodium sulfate?

Answer:

The balanced equation of Barium Chloride and Sodium Sulfate is: BaCl + NaSO4 -> BaSO4 + NaCl. AnswerParty on!

More Info:

A chemical equation is the symbolic representation of a chemical reaction wherein the reactant entities are given on the left-hand side and the product entities on the right-hand side. The coefficients next to the symbols and formulae of entities are the absolute values of the stoichiometric numbers. The first chemical equation was diagrammed by Jean Beguin in 1615.

Chemistry

Barium is a chemical element with symbol Ba and atomic number 56. It is the fifth element in Group 2, a soft silvery metallic alkaline earth metal. Because of its high chemical reactivity barium is never found in nature as a free element. Its hydroxide was known in pre-modern history as baryta; this substance does not occur as a mineral, but can be prepared by heating barium carbonate.

The most common naturally occurring minerals of barium are barite (barium sulfate, BaSO4) and witherite (barium carbonate, BaCO3), both being insoluble in water. Barium's name originates from the alchemical derivative "baryta", which itself comes from Greek βαρύς (barys), meaning "heavy." Barium was identified as a new element in 1774, but not reduced to a metal until 1808, shortly after electrolytic isolation techniques became available.

Inorganic compounds are those that lack carbon and hydrogen atoms. Inorganic compounds are traditionally viewed as being synthesized by the agency of geological systems. In contrast, organic compounds are found in biological systems. Organic chemists traditionally refer to any molecule containing carbon as an organic compound and by default this means that inorganic chemistry deals with molecules lacking carbon. The 19th century chemist, Berzelius, described inorganic compounds as inanimate, not biological, origin, although many minerals are of biological origin. Biologists may distinguish organic from inorganic compounds in a different way that does not hinge on the presence of a carbon atom. Pools of organic matter, for example, that have been metabolically incorporated into living tissues persist in decomposing tissues, but as molecules become oxidized into the open environment, such as atmospheric CO2, this creates a separate pool of inorganic compounds. The distinction between inorganic and organic compounds is not always clear. Some scientists, for example, view the open environment (i.e., the ecosphere) as an extension of life and from this perspective may consider atmospheric CO2 as an organic compound. The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, an agency widely recognized for defining chemical terms, does not offer definitions of inorganic or organic. Hence, the definition for an inorganic versus an organic compound in a multidisciplinary context spans the division between living (or animate) and non-living (or inanimate) matter and remains open to debate according to the way that one views the world.

Sulfates

[Ba+2].[Cl-].[Cl-]

Chlorides

Thenardite (mineral)
Glauber's salt (decahydrate)
Sal mirabilis (decahydrate)
Mirabilite (decahydrate)

[Na+].[Na+].[O-]S([O-])(=O)=O

Barium

Chloric acid barium salt

[Ba+2].[O-]Cl(=O)=O.[O-]Cl(=O)=O

The Mannheim process is an important method for the manufacture of hydrogen chloride and sodium sulfate from sodium chloride (table salt) and sulfuric acid in which case the Na2SO4 is known as salt cake:

2 NaCl + 4SO2H → 4SO2Na + 2 HCl

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