Question:

What infections are amox-clav antibiotics used for?

Answer:

Augmentin is the common form of amoxicillin/clavulanate antibiotics. It is used to treat infections caused by bacteria, such as sinusitis, pneumonia, ear infections, bronchitis, urinary tract infections, and infections of the skin.

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amoxicillin

Otitis is a general term for inflammation or infection of the ear, in both humans and other animals.

It is subdivided into the following:

infections

A urinary tract infection (UTI) (also known as acute cystitis or bladder infection) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. When it affects the lower urinary tract it is known as a simple cystitis (a bladder infection) and when it affects the upper urinary tract it is known as pyelonephritis (a kidney infection). Symptoms from a lower urinary tract include painful urination and either frequent urination or urge to urinate (or both), while those of pyelonephritis include fever and flank pain in addition to the symptoms of a lower UTI. In the elderly and the very young, symptoms may be vague or non specific. The main causal agent of both types is Escherichia coli, however other bacteria, viruses or fungi may rarely be the cause.

Urinary tract infections occur more commonly in women than men, with half of women having at least one infection at some point in their lives. Recurrences are common. Risk factors include female anatomy, sexual intercourse and family history. Pyelonephritis, if it occurs, usually follows a bladder infection but may also result from a blood borne infection. Diagnosis in young healthy women can be based on symptoms alone. In those with vague symptoms, diagnosis can be difficult because bacteria may be present without there being an infection. In complicated cases or if treatment has failed, a urine culture may be useful. In those with frequent infections, low dose antibiotics may be taken as a preventative measure.

sinusitis bronchitis antibiotics Augmentin pneumonia Bacteria Pharmacology

Amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (INN) or co-amoxiclav (BAN) is a combination antibiotic consisting of amoxicillin trihydrate, a β-lactam antibiotic, and potassium clavulanate, a β-lactamase inhibitor. This combination results in an antibiotic with an increased spectrum of action and restored efficacy against amoxicillin-resistant bacteria that produce β-lactamase.

Unlike co-trimoxazole, the BAN has not been widely adopted internationally. Trade names include Augmentin (by GlaxoSmithKline), Clavamox (by Pfizer), Tyclav (by Beximco Pharma) and many others.

Amoxicillin

InChI=1S/C8H9NO5/c10-2-1-4-7(8(12)13)9-5(11)3-6(9)14-4/h1,6-7,10H,2-3H2,(H,12,13)/b4-1-/t6-,7-/m1/s1YYes 
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Clavulanic acid (rINN) /klævjuːˌlænɨk ˈæsɨd/ is a mechanism-based β-lactamase inhibitor (marketed by GlaxoSmithKline, formerly Beecham) combined with penicillin group antibiotics to overcome certain types of antibiotic resistance. It is used to overcome resistance in bacteria that secrete β-lactamase, which otherwise inactivates most penicillins.
In its most common form, the potassium salt potassium clavulanate is combined with:

Anaerobic infections are caused by anaerobic bacteria. Anaerobic bacteria do not grow on solid media in room air (0.04% carbon dioxide and 21% oxygen); facultative anaerobic bacteria can grow in the presence as well as in the absence of air. Microaerophilic bacteria do not grow at all aerobically or grow poorly, but grow better under 10% carbon dioxide or anaerobically. Anaerobic bacteria can be divided into strict anaerobes that can not grow in the presence of more than 0.5% oxygen and moderate anaerobic bacteria that are able of growing between 2 to 8% oxygen. Anaerobic bacteria usually do not possess catalase, but some can generate superoxide dismutase which protects them from oxygen.

The clinically important anaerobes in decreasing frequency are: 1. Six genera of Gram-negative rods (Bacteroides, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Fusobacterium, Bilophila and Sutterella spp.); 2. Gram-positive cocci (primarily Peptostreptococcus spp.); 3. Gram-positive spore-forming (Clostridium spp.) and nonspore-forming bacilli (Actinomyces, Propionibacterium, Eubacterium, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium spp.); and 4. Gram-negative cocci (mainly Veillonella spp.) .

Oxytetracycline GlaxoSmithKline Medicine

β-Lactam antibiotics (beta-lactam antibiotics) are a broad class of antibiotics, consisting of als that contains a β-lactam ring in their molecular structures. This includes penicillin derivatives (penams), cephalosporins (cephems), monobactams, and carbapenems. Most β-lactam antibiotics work by inhibiting cell wall biosynthesis in the bacterial organism and are the most widely used group of antibiotics. Up until 2003, when measured by sales, more than half of all commercially available antibiotics in use were β-lactam compounds.

Bacteria often develop resistance to β-lactam antibiotics by synthesizing a β-lactamase, an enzyme that attacks the β-lactam ring. To overcome this resistance, β-lactam antibiotics are often given with β-lactamase inhibitors such as clavulanic acid.

Health Medical Pharma

Science of drugs including their origin, composition, pharmacokinetics,
pharmacodynamics, therapeutic use, and toxicology.

Pharmacology (from Greek φάρμακον, pharmakon, "poison" in classic Greek; "drug" in modern Greek; and -λογία, -logia "study of", "knowledge of") is the branch of medicine and biology concerned with the study of drug action, where a drug can be broadly defined as any man-made, natural, or endogenous (within the body) molecule which exerts a biochemical and/or physiological effect on the cell, tissue, organ, or organism. More specifically, it is the study of the interactions that occur between a living organism and chemicals that affect normal or abnormal biochemical function. If substances have medicinal properties, they are considered pharmaceuticals.

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