Question:

What has happened now to Elisabeth Fritzl and the children she bore?

Answer:

Elisabeth Fritzl is now safe from her father, as well as her children, but their future remains very uncertain at this point.

More Info:

Incest Rape
Fritzl case

The Fritzl case emerged in April 2008 when a 42-year-old woman, Elisabeth Fritzl (born April 6, 1966), told police in the town of Amstetten, Austria, that she had been held captive for 24 years in a concealed corridor part of the basement area of the large family house by her father, Josef Fritzl (born April 9, 1935), and that Fritzl had physically assaulted, sexually abused, and raped her numerous times during her imprisonment. The abuse by her father resulted in the birth of seven children and one miscarriage; four of the children joined their mother in captivity, and three were raised by Josef and Rosemarie Fritzl and reported as foundlings.


Lower Austria

Lower Austria (German: About this sound Niederösterreich ) is the northeasternmost state of the nine states in Austria. The capital of Lower Austria since 1986 is Sankt Pölten, the most recently designated capital town in Austria. The capital of Lower Austria had formerly been Vienna, even though Vienna is not officially part of Lower Austria. With a land area of 19,186 km² and a population of 1.612 million people, it is the largest state in Austria, and in terms of population second only to the federal state of Vienna.

Situated east of Upper Austria, Lower Austria derives its name from its downriver location on the Danube River, which flows from west to east. Lower Austria has an international border, 414 km long, with the Czech Republic (mainly South Moravia) and Slovakia. The state has the second longest external border of all Austrian states. It borders on other Austrian states of Upper Austria, Styria and Burgenland. The state surrounds Vienna.

Crime Family Elisabeth Humanities

The Linz sisters, Viktoria, Katharina and Elisabeth, are three women whose mother gradually withdrew them from school by creating and reinforcing a story that their father was a monster, to the extent that they believed they must absolutely avoid him. This resulted in the children increasingly remaining indoors in a house of incredible filth for seven years, from 1998 to 2005. They are known as the Linz sisters because the case took place in Gramastetten near Linz, Austria. Early media reports that the mother had kept the children prisoner and that they had invented a language were contradicted by a special report in Le Figaro. In that report, Margareth Tews, the tutor of the youngest two, stated they were busy re-accustomising them to the presence of their father.

Their mother gained custody of the children following her divorce, at the age of 53. Afterwards, she suffered a mental breakdown. Le Figaro reported that the children, then aged 7, 11 and 13, gradually became absent from school, and they remained at home of their own accord in a smart, upper middle-class suburb. When they were discovered, the house had no running water]citation needed[ and was filled with waste and excrement. The mother was said to have been summoned to court nine times during the seven years after complaints were made by the father, who was then a second magistrate of the court of appeal at Linz, and by neighbours, but officials never found a reason to investigate the case more closely.]clarification needed[

The Fritzl case emerged in April 2008 when a 42-year-old woman, Elisabeth Fritzl (born April 6, 1966), told police in the town of Amstetten, Austria, that she had been held captive for 24 years in a concealed corridor part of the basement area of the large family house by her father, Josef Fritzl (born April 9, 1935), and that Fritzl had physically assaulted, sexually abused, and raped her numerous times during her imprisonment. The abuse by her father resulted in the birth of seven children and one miscarriage; four of the children joined their mother in captivity, and three were raised by Josef and Rosemarie Fritzl and reported as foundlings.

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