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What happened to Patsy Cline?

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Patsy Cline (September 8, 1932 -- March 5, 1963), born in Winchester, VA, real name Virginia Patterson Hensley, was a country music singer who enjoyed pop music crossover success during the era of the Nashville sound in the early 1960s. Since her death at 30 in a plane crash at the height of her career, she has been considered one of the most influential female singers of all time. Her hits include her #1 1961 classic Crazy, I Fall To Pieces, and Walkin After Midnight! AnswerParty!

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Virginia Patterson Hensley (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963), known professionally as Patsy Cline, was an American country music singer. Part of the early 1960s Nashville sound, Cline successfully "crossed over" to pop music. She died at age 30 at the height of her career in a private plane crash. She was one of the most influential, successful and acclaimed female vocalists of the 20th century.

Cline was best known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice and her role as a country music industry pioneer. Along with Kitty Wells, she helped pave the way for women as headline performers in the genre. Cline was cited as an inspiration by singers in several genres. Books, movies, documentaries, articles and stage plays document her life and career.

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Country music is a genre of American popular music that originated in the rural regions of the Southern United States in the 1920s. It takes its roots from the southeastern genre of American folk music and Western music. Blues modes have been used extensively throughout its recorded history. Country music often consists of ballads and dance tunes with generally simple forms and harmonies accompanied by mostly string instruments such as banjos, electric and acoustic guitars, fiddles, and harmonicas.

The term country music gained popularity in the 1940s in preference to the earlier term hillbilly music; it came to encompass Western music, which evolved parallel to hillbilly music from similar roots, in the mid-20th century. The term country music is used today to describe many styles and subgenres. In 2009 country music was the most listened to rush hour radio genre during the evening commute, and second most popular in the morning commute in the United States.

Hensley

"I Fall to Pieces" is a single released by Patsy Cline in 1961, and was featured on her 1961 studio album, Patsy Cline Showcase. "I Fall to Pieces" was Cline's first #1 hit on the Country charts, and her second hit single to cross over onto the Pop charts. It was the first of a string of songs that would be written by Hank Cochran and Harlan Howard (not always collaborating) for Cline.

"I Fall to Pieces" became one of Cline's most-recognizable hit singles. It has also been classified as a country music standard.

Crazy Imagine That

The discography of Patsy Cline, an American country pop artist, consists of three studio albums, one compilation album, six extended plays, twenty four singles, and seven B-sides. For material released after the artist's death in 1963, see Patsy Cline posthumous discography.

After performing in a band in 1954, Cline was signed by Bill McCall to Four Star Records, based in Pasadena, California. She made her first recording session for the label in June 1955, releasing her debut single, "A Church, a Courtroom, and Goodbye" in July. Cline issued seventeen singles to the country music recording charts between 1955 and 1960, however only one of them was a major hit. After releasing the singles, "Hidin' Out", "I Love You Honey", and "I've Loved and Lost Again", her first single issued in 1957 entitled "Walkin' After Midnight" peaked at #2 on the Billboard Magazine Hot Country Songs list and #12 on the Top Pop Songs chart. The song's success spawned Cline's self-titled debut album to be released in August 1957. Cline's additional singles between 1958 and 1960 ranged in variations between country, Gospel, and Rockabilly. These songs included such releases as, "Three Cigarettes (In an Ashtray)," "Come on In (And Make Yourself at Home)," "Dear God," and "Crazy Dreams."

Disaster Accident Entertainment Culture Virginia

Virginia Patterson Hensley (September 8, 1932 – March 5, 1963), known professionally as Patsy Cline, was an American country music singer. Part of the early 1960s Nashville sound, Cline successfully "crossed over" to pop music. She died at age 30 at the height of her career in a private plane crash. She was one of the most influential, successful and acclaimed female vocalists of the 20th century.

Cline was best known for her rich tone, emotionally expressive and bold contralto voice and her role as a country music industry pioneer. Along with Kitty Wells, she helped pave the way for women as headline performers in the genre. Cline was cited as an inspiration by singers in several genres. Books, movies, documentaries, articles and stage plays document her life and career.

country music singer Winchester Nashville
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