Question:

What establishes the electrochemical gradient across a membrane to provide energy for ATP production?

Answer:

H+ ions (protons) collect on one side of membrane because they are pumped there by certain carriers. The electrochemical 'MORE'?

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energy Electrochemistry

A transport protein (variously referred to as a transmembrane pump, transporter protein, escort protein, fatty acid transport protein, cation transport protein, or anion transport protein) is a protein which serves the function of moving other materials within an organism. Transport proteins are vital to the growth and life of all living things. There are several different kinds of transport proteins.

Carrier proteins are proteins involved in the movement of ions, small molecules, or macromolecules, such as another protein, across a biological membrane. Carrier proteins are integral membrane proteins; that is they exist within and span the membrane across which they transport substances. The proteins may assist in the movement of substances by facilitated diffusion (i.e. passive transport) or active transport. These mechanisms of movement are known as carrier mediated transport. Each carrier protein is designed to recognize only one substance or one group of very similar substances. Research has correlated defects in specific carrier proteins with specific diseases. A membrane transport protein (or simply transporter) is a membrane protein which acts as such a carrier.

Electrophysiology

An electrochemical gradient is a gradient of electrochemical potential, usually for an ion that can move across a membrane. The gradient consists of two parts, the electrical potential and a difference in the chemical concentration across a membrane. The difference of electrochemical potentials can be interpreted as a type of potential energy available for work in a cell. The energy is stored in the form of chemical potential, which accounts for an ion's concentration gradient across a cell membrane, and electrostatic energy, which accounts for an ion's tendency to move under influence of the transmembrane potential.

Electrochemical potential is important in electroanalytical chemistry and industrial applications such as batteries and fuel cells. It represents one of the many interchangeable forms of potential energy through which energy may be conserved.

In biology, an ion transporter, also called an ion pump, is a transmembrane protein that moves ions across a plasma membrane against their concentration gradient, in contrast to ion channels, where ions go through passive transport. These primary transporters are enzymes that convert energy from various sources, including ATP, sunlight, and other redox reactions, to potential energy stored in an electrochemical gradient. This energy is then used by secondary transporters, including ion carriers and ion channels, to drive vital cellular processes, such as ATP synthesis.

Such ion pumps can use energy from a variety of sources, including ATP or the concentration gradient of another ion (sometimes called an "ion exchanger"). Symporters transport anions down their concentration gradient to fuel the transport of another type of ion in the same direction, while antiporters also use the concentration gradient in this same manner but transport in the opposite direction. In contrast, uniporters transport a single ion down its concentration gradient. In all of these cases, there is at least one driving ion that travels down its concentration gradient, thereby providing the energy of the system. Ions that are moved up their concentration gradients are called the driven ion. For a more detailed description of one particular kind of ion pump, see -ATPase+/K+Na.

Carrier proteins are different carrier proteins facilitate the diffusion of different molecules while Channel Proteins are involved within the movement of ions, small molecules, or macromolecules, such as another protein, across a biological membrane. Carrier proteins are integral/intrinsic membrane proteins; that is they exist within and span the membrane across which they transport substances. The proteins may assist in the movement of substances by facilitated diffusion or active transport. These mechanisms of movement are known as carrier mediated transport. Each carrier protein is designed to recognize only one substance or one group of very similar substances. Research has correlated defects in specific carrier proteins with specific diseases.

Active transport involves the use of an electrochemical gradient, and requires the use of energy produced in the cell. A carrier protein is required to move particles from areas of low concentration to areas of high concentration. These carrier proteins have receptors that bind to a specific molecule (substrate) needing transport. The molecule or ion to be transported (the substrate) must first bind at a binding site at the carrier molecule, with a certain binding affinity. Following binding, and while the binding site is facing the same way, the carrier will capture or occlude (take in and retain) the substrate within its molecular structure and cause an internal translocation so that the opening in the protein now faces the other side of the plasma membrane. The carrier protein substrate is released at that site, according to its binding affinity there.

Ion Chemiosmosis

Active transport is the movement of all types of molecules across a cell membrane against its concentration gradient (from low to high concentration). In all cells, this is usually concerned with accumulating high concentrations of molecules that the cell needs, such as ions, glucose and amino acids. If the process uses chemical energy, such as from adenosine triphosphate (ATP), it is termed primary active transport. Secondary active transport involves the use of an electrochemical gradient. Active transport uses cellular energy, unlike passive transport, which does not use cellular energy. Active transport is a good example of a process for which cells require energy. Examples of active transport include the uptake of glucose in the intestines in humans and the uptake of mineral ions into root hair cells of plants.

Biology

Membrane biology is the study of the biological and physiochemical characteristics of membranes.


Cellular respiration is the set of the metabolic reactions and processes that take place in the cells of organisms to convert biochemical energy from nutrients into adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and then release waste products. The reactions involved in respiration are catabolic reactions, which break large molecules into smaller ones, releasing energy in the process as weak so-called "high-energy" bonds are replaced by stronger bonds in the products. Respiration is one of the key ways a cell gains useful energy to fuel cellular activity. Cellular respiration is considered an exothermic redox reaction. The overall reaction is broken into many smaller ones when it occurs in the body, most of which are redox reactions themselves. Although technically, cellular respiration is a combustion reaction, it clearly does not resemble one when it occurs in a living cell. This difference is because it occurs in many separate steps. While the overall reaction is a combustion reaction, no single reaction that comprises it is a combustion reaction.

Nutrients that are commonly used by animal and plant cells in respiration include sugar, amino acids and fatty acids, and a common oxidizing agent (electron acceptor) is molecular oxygen (O2). The energy stored in ATP (its third phosphate group is weakly bonded to the rest of the molecule and is cheaply broken allowing stronger bonds to form, thereby transferring energy for use by the cell) can then be used to drive processes requiring energy, including biosynthesis, locomotion or transportation of molecules across cell membranes.

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